Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

After an discussion at work, I still do not have an satisfying answer about the following, in no other programming language we speak of privileged functions.

var kid = function(name)
{
    // Private
    var idol = "Paris Hilton";

    // Privileged
    this.get_idol = function()
    {
        return idol;
    };
}

The only logic I could think of is that if you make an public function return an private variable, that function is 'privileged' to do this (because you cannot call it directly).

We can do the same in php but we do not use this fancy name, nor can i recall any other language using this term.

You might even come to thing that if you need an 'privileged' function your whole approach is wrong, since if you need it accessible from the outside, why not make it public directly.

On the other hand the private variable cannot be changed from the outside and therefor it would become protected. but displayed to the outside.

In the end, as an somewhat newcomer to plain javascript, the term is somewhat confusing and imho just a fancy name to make it more confusing, because then in php it would become also like javascript :

class kid
{
    // Private
    private idol = "Paris Hilton";

    // PUBLIC OR PRIVILEGED ? 
    public function get_idol()
    {
        echo $this->idol;
    }
}

it does the same but is just a public method.

share|improve this question
    
I suggest you read a bit on JS's take on OOP (prototype-based) and closures. Your JS example has little to do with a class declaration. –  delnan Mar 10 '11 at 21:16
    
@deinan, the code posted is the standard way of simulating classes in JavaScript. –  Hendrik Brummermann Mar 10 '11 at 21:22
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Javascript doesn't have privileged or whatever functions. All it's functions are closures and that's what is in use there, C# got this also and most functional languages.

The ECMA norm for the language is available if you need, the word privileged don't appear once inside of it.

The term seem to come from http://www.crockford.com/javascript/private.html but it's just a simplification of the closure concept to a specific case of their usage targeted i guess to OOP-programmer types.

Javascript could be more powerful design-wise than most OOP languages but you need to approach it with an open mind and by understanding functional concepts. Trying to coerce it to become yet-another-OOP-language would be both a bad idea and a shame.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for pointing out the ECMA norm, never actually looked there, also you are right: the term is indeed from crockford's website, and it is found on some other website as well probably from there. So in the end there is no such thing as privileged.. ( thank god! ) –  DonSeba Mar 10 '11 at 21:26
    
Yes, and crockford has a bad habit of inventing new terms –  Pacerier May 1 at 20:22
add comment

I've never heard of a privileged function; the correct term is a closure: you define a function in a scope which has access to variables defined in its outer scope. Closures can be used in lots of languages (Javascript, Python, Lisp/Scheme all do, and Java does in part through inner classes that can reach final variables in the closure scope).

Member variables of an object (e.g. this.foo in Java/Javascript or this->foo in PHP) are different.

share|improve this answer
1  
I could hardly agree more. Javascript is an interesting language. The only way you can really have "private variables" in javascript is through a closure. Only functions within the scope the variable is defined have access to it. Nothing outside that function / scope does. I do not believe javascript was designed with object oriented practices in mind. It seems more of an afterthought. –  Sam Mar 10 '11 at 21:17
    
This should have been the accepted answer. This is about closures and the scope they create, nothing more. –  Nick Wiggill Jan 21 '13 at 11:42
add comment

Yes, the pattern is used to simulate private properties and public methods accessing them.

JavaScript does not really have public/private properties/functions of objects. The private properties is a local variable in the constructor function, which may be accessed by the sub-function ("closure" in javascript terms). And then a reference to the sub-function is added as property to the object.

I don't think the term "privileged function" is commonly used. I have only seen it in "JavaScript for OOP people" tutorials.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The terms public, private, and privileged are not part of the JS language definition. As mentioned elsewhere, the term privileged for JS was popularized by Douglas Crockford.

The point is that JavaScript supports information hiding.

The significant distinction of public versus privileged is that when you define a function as part of a prototype, the function cannot access private members. For example:

kid.prototype.doSomething = function () {
    // Cannot access the idol property
};
share|improve this answer
add comment

You correctly infer that the purpose is to make the variable idol private. It can only be read from the outside, not modified.

But your code in PHP is not equivalent because the JS kid is a function that has stuff on it. A more common idiom would be something like:

var kid = function() { return {}; }();

The key here is that now kid is an object defined inside the function, so all the private state of kid can be hidden and only the attached public methods are usable.

share|improve this answer
1  
um, your example is completely wrong, it should be something like var counter = function() { var x = 0; return function() { return ++x; }}(); –  Jason S Mar 10 '11 at 21:18
add comment
var kid = function(name)
{
    // Private
    var aVal = 1;

    // Privileged
    this.get_idol = function()
    {
        return aVal++;
    };
}


var myKid= new kid();

//returns:1
myKid.get_idol();

//returns: 2
myKid.get_idol();

//returns: 3
myKid.get_idol();

May be someone has used the word privileged , just to make the point that var aVal = 1; exist even after execution of the anonymous function and can be accessed from the get_idol.

I myself have never heard of the word privileged, you should actually look for closure and anonymous function

share|improve this answer
    
it comes from this page : link –  DonSeba Mar 10 '11 at 21:28
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.