Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

suppose you have the following table named Likes:

A|B
---
a|b
a|f
a|e
a|i
b|a
b|i
c|d
e|p

In this table, values in A represent people who "like" people in B. So, a likes b, a likes f, a likes e, and so forth. How do you write a query such that you get the number of different users who are two degrees of separation from each user? So as an example, if a likes b, then b is one degree of separation from a. If a likes b, and b likes c, then c is two degrees of separation from a. One more example, if a likes b, and b likes a, then a is two degrees of separation from itself (we don't exclude cycles). So the output should be something like this:

User|CountOfUsersWhoAreTwoDegreesFromUser
-----------------------------------------
 a  |  -
 b  |  -
 c  |  -
 e  |  -

Now, I'm not sure what our counts would be for each user, so I didn't write it in the above table. Also, no persons in the table Likes like themselves. So you will not see a combination like a|a in Likes, or b|b in Likes. Can anyone help me out with this?

share|improve this question
    
A does not have unique values... – Tom Medley Mar 10 '11 at 21:13
    
made a typo, updated it – Boobie Mar 10 '11 at 21:16
    
Note that as you have phrased the problem, if (A, B) and (B, A) then A will be counted as being two degrees from itself. – Thom Smith Mar 10 '11 at 21:30
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since you need consider only two connections at once, this can be done with joins. (If you had to consider the full closure of the Likes relation, then you would need the full power of recursion, such as an implementation of Dijkstra's algorithm.)

SELECT X.A AS user, COUNT(DISTINCT Y.B) AS countOfUsersWhoAreTwoDegreesFromUser
FROM Likes AS X
    INNER JOIN Likes AS Y
    ON X.B = Y.A
GROUP BY user

EDIT: To be clear, this problem is simple and reasonable efficient for any fixed degree of separation.y

EDIT 2: Here's a variant solution which will prevent a user from being counted as two degrees from themselves. This varies from the literal problem description, but might be what was intended.

SELECT X.A AS user, COUNT(DISTINCT Y.B) AS countOfUsersWhoAreTwoDegreesFromUser
FROM Likes AS X
    INNER JOIN Likes AS Y
    ON X.B = Y.A
WHERE X.A <> Y.B
GROUP BY user
share|improve this answer
    
it will not handle case, A likes A in two degree ... Like A -> B, B-> A .... – Nitin Midha Mar 10 '11 at 21:33
    
The answer as originally posted will handle that case as specified in the original question, counting A as two degrees from itself. If this is not what was actually intended, then the second query will handle that case in the more intuitively obvious way. – Thom Smith Mar 10 '11 at 21:37
select primary.A, count(*)
from likes primary
   inner join likes secondary on primary.B = secondary.A
group by primary.A
share|improve this answer

NOTE: this approach is not Scalable ... If you are interested ONLY and ONLY in two degrees, we can go for a self join ...

Condition T1.A <> T2.B is to filter out A liking A, Distinct is applied so that even if A like C by two degrees by two different path, its still counted as 1.

SELECT T.A, Count(T.B)
FROM
(
  SELECT  DISTINCT T1.A, T2.B 
    FROM Table1 T1
   INNER JOIN Table1 T2 on T1.B = T2.A AND T1.A <> T2.B
) T
GROUP BY T.A
share|improve this answer

To cope with an arbitrary value for degree, a CTE could be used in PostgreSQL:

with recursive graph (a, b, path, degree) as
(
  select a, b, array[a::text, b::text] as path, 1 as degree
  from likes

  union all

  select l.a, l.b, g.path || l.b::text, g.degree + 1
  from likes l
    join graph g on l.a = g.b and l.b  g.a
)
select *
from graph
where degree = 2
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.