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If function returns a two value list or tuple on success or False on failure, how can I best unpack the return list into two variables while also checking for False?

def get_key_value():
  if (cond != True):
    return False
  return [val1, val2]

# Call it
# How can I also check for False while unpacking?
key, value = get_key_value()
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7  
Maybe it would be better to throw an exception instead of returning two different kinds of values. –  Felix Kling Mar 10 '11 at 21:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Coverting @Felix Kling's great comment into an answer.

If not being able to find a (key, value) pair indicates some kind of system failure, it would be better to throw an exception. If your failure doesn't really fall into any of the standard exceptions, you should build a new exception type of your own.

The cond != True is better written as not cond. Also it's better to not create a list if it's not necessary.

class DataNotFound(Exception): pass

def get_key_value():
  if not cond:
    raise DataNotFound("Couldn't find it!")
  return val1, val2

try:
    key,value = get_key_value()
except DataNotFound:
    #handle the failure somehow
    key, value = 'ERROR', 'ERROR'
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1  
+1 Just two details: if not cond: and return (val1, val2). –  delnan Mar 10 '11 at 21:43
1  
I agree with @delnan, if not cond is MUCH preferred over if cond != True. As for the return, even just return val1, val2 will suffice. –  Paul McGuire Mar 10 '11 at 22:12

This falls under the "Easier to Ask for Forgiveness than Permission" policy of Python. I avoid catching TypeError in your function, in case there's some other unforeseen problem.

data = get_key_value()
try:
   key, value = data
except TypeError:
   #handle the failure somehow
   key, value = 'ERROR', 'ERROR'
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I don't think there is an idiomatic way to do this -- not least because a function that behaves that way is itself unidiomatic. If you have to do it, I suggest you simply make use of the fact that your 2-element list or tuple is a "truthy" rather than a "falsy" value (this isn't Python terminology but it's useful):

pair_or_false = get_key_value()
if pair:
    key,value = val
else:
    # handle failure in whatever way

The obvious alternative is to treat the not-found case as an exception:

try:
    key,value = get_key_value()
except TypeError:
    # deal with not-found case

but if there's any possibility at all that something other than the unsuccessful unpacking could raise a TypeError then you run the risk of masking a genuine error that way.

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I had been dealing with it using your first if/else method but hoped to reduce my linecount since the function is called many times. I'll see how it works out catching TypeError. The application is fairly straightforward DOM parsing and the risk is low for other TypeErrors. Thanks. –  Michael Berkowski Mar 10 '11 at 21:44

You're running into problems because you're mixing return types. Just because you can doesn't mean you should.

Although I agree with the others here that an exception is one appropriate way to go, it may depend on whether you expect to find a valid key & value most of the time. If so, use an exception (something like KeyError) to indicate that the function failed. But if you expect it to fail at a high rate, you may not want the exception overhead. In that case, return something like [None, None] from get_key_value and then your calling code would look like:

key, value = get_key_value()
if key:
    # take action
else:
    # handle the error appropriately
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