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I have a string with several fields separated by a specific character, something like this:

A,B,C

I want to split the string at the commas and assign each resulting field to its own string variable. In Perl I can do that elegantly like this:

my ($varA, $varB, $varC) = split (/,/, $string);

What is the simplest and most elegant way to achieve the same result in C#?

I know that I can split into an array:

string[] results = string.Split(',');

But then I would have to access the fields via their index, e.g. results[2]. That is difficult to read and error-prone - consider not having 3 buth 30 fields. For that reason I prefer having each field value in its own named variable.

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3  
Not an answer on how to do it with C#, but F# can do pretty much exactly what you want: let [| a; b; c |] = "1,2,3".Split(',') –  Joel Mueller Mar 10 '11 at 23:31
2  
F# is awesome. I wish it were more popular in commercial settings. –  Ritch Melton Mar 11 '11 at 2:02

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I agree. Hiding the split in an Adapter class seems like a good approach and communicates your intent rather well:

public class MySplitter
{
     public MySplitter(string split)
     {
         var results = string.Split(',');
         NamedPartA = results[0];
         NamedpartB = results[1];
     }

     public string NamedPartA { get; private set; }
     public string NamedPartB { get; private set; }
}
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Why not use a Tuple? –  Linkgoron Mar 10 '11 at 21:40
1  
If I understand your answer correctly, it requires one class per usage scenario of Split because the number of results are fixed as well as the names. I want the names to be flexible. –  Helge Klein Mar 10 '11 at 21:43
    
I'd say it requires one instance per type that you want to have names for. It's a minor bit of code that makes the consumer code easier to read and interpret. –  Ritch Melton Mar 10 '11 at 21:48
    
Except that I'd expect MySplitter to be something that stores the result named parts. A splitter should just split and return the split parts. Instead, I might consider something more semantic: Person that has First and Last and a static method called parse that returns a new instance of Person. person.First would make more sense to me than personSplitter.First –  Brian Genisio Oct 14 '11 at 13:11

There is no built in way in C# to do a multiple assignment like you can in Perl; however, there are multiple solutions to get the data into each variable via a normal path.

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Well, what is the most elegant way to get the data into each variable? –  Helge Klein Mar 10 '11 at 21:46
    
In my opinion, Rich Melton (above) posted a good solution - it abstracts the 'crap' (the splitting) behind a complex object and then names the resulting output variables into properties. –  Tejs Mar 10 '11 at 21:48

I recommend a dictionary.

List<string> names = new List<string> (){"varA","varB","varC"};
Dictionary<string, string> map = new Dictionary<string, string>();
string[] results = myLongString.Split(',');
for (int i = 0; i < results.Length; i++) map.Add(names[i], results[i]); 
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That looks like overkill to me and is not very easy to read (5 lines instead of 1). –  Helge Klein Mar 10 '11 at 21:45

You can use Tuples (added in .Net 4). Tuples in MSDN

This:

public class MySplitter
{
     public MySplitter(string split)
     {
         var results = split.Split(',');
         NamedPartA = results[0];
         NamedpartB = results[1];
     }

     public string NamedPartA { get; private set; }
     public string NamedPartB { get; private set; }
}

Could be achieved with something like this:

public Tuple<string,string> SplitIntoVars(string toSplit)
{
   string[] split = toSplit.Split(',');
   return Tuple.Create(split[0],split[1]);
}

With a Tuple you can use:

var x = SplitIntoVars(arr);
// you can access the items like this:    x.Item1 or x.Item2 (and x.Item3 etc.)

You can also create a Tuple for using Tuple<string,int> etc.

Also... I don't really like out parameters, so you emulate returning multiple values using a Tuple (and obviously, also of varying types). this:

public void SplitIntoVariables(string input, out a, out b, out c)
{
    string pieces[] = input.Split(',');
    a = pieces[0];
    b = pieces[1];
    c = pieces[2];
}

turns into this:

public Tuple<string,string,string> SplitIntoVariables(string[] input)
    {
        string pieces[] = input.Split(',');
        return Tuple.Create(pieces[0],pieces[1],pieces[2]);
    }

Other (more imaginative) options could be creating an ExpandoObject (dynamic) that holds your values (something akin to ViewBag in ASP.NET MVC)

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1  
Interesting. Did not know about tuples before. –  Helge Klein Mar 10 '11 at 22:09
    
One of the reason for not suggesting a Tuple is the fact that result[0] isn't much clearer than tuple.Item1, Item2, etc.... The OP explicitly stated a desire for named values. –  Ritch Melton Mar 11 '11 at 2:01
    
I think it's still better than arrays, as it's not exactly using indexes, and you don't recreate structures that exist in the FW. Either way, I think the best solution would probably involve a solution that's closer to the actual problem, and not something so general as the current question. IMO the most elegant solution (if you cant create a good concrete class) would be something such as a Dynamic Dictionary (like the ViewBag). –  Linkgoron Mar 11 '11 at 2:13
    
I agree. Other languages have much better answers to this sort of problem (Perl, OCaml, F#). For C#, my approach is the style I'd use. Obviously I'm biased ;) –  Ritch Melton Mar 11 '11 at 3:20

And who can't resist some Linq insanity!

string names = "Joe,Bob,Lucy";
var myVars = names.Split(',').Select((x, index) => Tuple.Create(index,x)).ToDictionary(x => "var" + x.Item1, y => y.Item2);
Debug.WriteLine(myVars["var0"]);
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1  
Sooo... Youve got a Dictionary[var+Index] of strings instead of an string array[Index]? –  Linkgoron Mar 10 '11 at 23:30
3  
Well it is insane... –  gt124 Mar 10 '11 at 23:48

Not a one line solution. But, how about an extension method with an additional out parameter?

public static IEnumerable<T> Unpack<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, out T target)
{
    target = source.First();
    return source.Skip(1);
}

Then, you could use the method like this.

string values = "aaa,bbb,ccc";
string x, y, z;
values.Split(',')
    .Unpack(out x)
    .Unpack(out y)
    .Unpack(out z);

Note that the Unpack method enumerates the sequence twice. So, I'd use it only if the data in the IEnumerable object is repeatable.

I didn't care to check the performance of the method because I thought that normally we would not unpack a large array.

Of course, you could use ref modifier instead of out, and the usage would be different.

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I couldn't resist adding to the ridiculousness :) Please don't use this "solution", at least not as-is.

static class StringExtensions
{
   private static readonly Func<object, string, Action<object, object>> GetSetter =
       (o1, n) => (o2, v) => o1.GetType().GetProperty(n).SetValue(o2, v, null);

   public static T AssignFromCSV<T>(this string csv, T obj, string[] propertyNames)
   {
       var a = csv.Split(new[] {','});
       for (var i = 0 ; i < propertyNames.Length; i++)
       {
           GetSetter(obj, propertyNames[i])(obj, a[i]);
       }
       return obj ;
   }
}

class TargetClass
{
   public string A { get; set; }

   public string B { get; set; }

   public string C { get; set; }
}

Usage:

var target = "1,2,3".AssignFromCSV(new TargetClass(), new[] {"A", "B", "C"}) ;
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