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I have an application that consists of an Engine which manages a number (usually less than 30) of Pollers. The Engine is running in a Windows Service and when it starts it initiates all of the Pollers that have been configured. The Pollers should run continuously as long as the Windows Service is running. The application has been in production for some time, but I am doing some restructuring to it for performance considerations. Previously, I initiated Threads manually so that each poller would run in its own Thread. I would like to use TPL for the added parallelism.

I have gotten it to work by doing a simple Parallel.ForEach() loop. I can kick off each Poller and do a single poll. BTW, each Poller has a configured TimeSpan value for its Frequency which is how long to wait inbetween polls. By default, this value is 5 seconds.

Here's my question. What might be the best way to run each Poller continuously so that they Poll over and over until the Engine is stopped? Here's what I'm using so far. Let me know if this looks like I"m on the right track or if there's an obviously better way. Thanks.

    public void Start()
    {
        Parallel.ForEach(Pollers, p => InitiatePolling(p));
        running = true;            
    }

    private void InitiatePolling(Poller poller)
    {
        Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
        while (running)
        {
            watch.Start();
            poller.Poll();
            while (watch.Elapsed < poller.Frequency); //wait until the alotted frequency
        }
    }

EDIT: After suggestions, here's my code. It's working good, but I'd like to see if anyone can see any problems with it that I might be overlooking:

    public void Start()
    {
        if (!_initialized) Initialize();
        running = true;
        Parallel.ForEach(Pollers, p =>
        {
            Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
            while (running)
            {
                watch.Restart();
                p.Poll();
                Thread.Sleep(p.Frequency - watch.Elapsed); 
            }
        });
    }

Actually, it appears to be working quite well in my initial testing. The processor does not even register the process (switched from a while loop to the Threading.Sleep as suggested). See anything wrong with it as is?

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1  
Don't actively poll for time! Use Thread.Sleep! (or async/await, in the future!) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 10 '11 at 21:42

2 Answers 2

You shouldn't use a busy wait loop. That's just going to suck CPU cycles. Plus, I don't see how your current setup will even work. That is, this loop:

while (watch.Elapsed < poller.Frequency);

Will delay (maybe) once. After that, since watch.Elapsed is never reset, the loop will never wait.

A better approach is to either sleep for the required time or, even better, just don't have multiple persistent polling threads. Instead, initialize the poller objects with timers that call Poll as required.

So instead of multiple threads and your InitiatePolling method, add a System.Threading.Timer to your Poller class, and a method to start and stop polling:

class Poller
{
    // other stuff here

    System.Threading.Timer PollTimer = null;

    public void StartPolling(int pollFrequency)
    {
        PollTimer = new System.Threading.Timer((s) => { Poll(); }, null, pollFrequency, pollFrequency);
    }

    public void StopPolling()
    {
        PollTimer.Dispose();
    }
}

The Poll method will then be called at whatever frequency is required, and you don't have 30 persistent threads, meaning that the thread pool can much more effectively manage the workload.

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Does this method (using the System.Threading.Timer) utilize the new parallelism of .Net 4.0? My existing system uses threads (though not nearly as elegantly as your proposed solution) but my current chore is to increase performance by adding parallelism. Thanks. –  Jeremy Foster Mar 11 '11 at 20:52
    
@Jeremy: It uses parallelism in that you can have multiple polls going concurrently. However, there's nothing new in my solution. Timers have been in .NET since the beginning. The system as you describe it wouldn't benefit from added parallelism, and in fact performance would suffer if you had one persistent thread per poller. With the timer-based solution, you let the thread pool decide when it needs to start new threads to handle the polling workload. Without more information about your application, I can't say whether the rest of it would benefit from added parallelism. –  Jim Mischel Mar 11 '11 at 22:42
    
Thank you for the recommendation. I implemented it and did some testing and it doesn't appear to be what I need for this and here's why. Although I might have a number of pollers, each poller should only perform one poll at a time. When I used the Threading.Timer, it waits for the specified period and then launches a new poll concurrently. So I want the pollers to be running in different threads, but not the polls. I'm back to my original code (modified according to your suggestions). See my EDIT above. –  Jeremy Foster Mar 12 '11 at 4:00
    
@Jeremy: You can avoid reentrancy in the timer callback by making the timer a one-shot (specify Timeout.Infinite for the second parameter), and restart the timer after each poll. That's essentially what you're doing with your Thread.Sleep ... Your choice, but in general you're better off without the multiple persistent threads. –  Jim Mischel Mar 12 '11 at 14:11

My understanding of the TPL/Thread-Pool is it is meant for short lived threads. A long running thread can cause the thread pool to have traffic jam.

I've read a few MSDN magazines last year that were talking about TPL and how well it runs with short lived tasks that take under 50ms.

I could be wrong, but that's what I got out of it.

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1  
TPL does allow for long running threads by utilizing the TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning value when you create a Task. This provides a hint to the TaskScheduler used for the Task to allow for over subscription. How the scheduler implements this is up to them however with the default scheduler it will not cause a traffic jam with the thread pool if you use this flag. You should use it only if you really have to as well. social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/parallelextensions/… –  Rodney Foley Dec 14 '12 at 20:22

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