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Is there a way to use the Named Constructor Idiom with templates in a "pretty" fashion?

For instance:

#include <vector>
using namespace std;

template< typename T >
class Foo
{
public:
    static Foo Copy(const T& arg)
    {
        Foo ret;
        ret.t_copy = arg;
        return ret;
    }

    static Foo CopyClear(const T& arg)
    {
        Foo ret;
        ret.t_copy = arg;
        ret.t_copy.clear();
        return ret;
    }

private:
    T t_copy;
};


int main( int argc, char** argv )
{
    vector<double> vec;
    vec.push_back(1);

    // #1: won't compile
    Foo< vector<double> > a_foo = Foo::CopyClear( vec );

    // #2: ugly, but works
    Foo< vector<double> > a_foo = Foo< vector<double> >::CopyClear( vec );

    return 0;
}

I'd like to use the syntax of #1 somehow. #2 works but rubs my DRY sense the wrong way.

EDIT: New, more "realistic" version of Foo.

EDIT2: No C++0x/C++1x for me I'm afraid :(

share|improve this question
    
where is #2 or are you referring to the rvalue correctly scoped call that isn't ambiguous? Have you consider a more elegant solution like just passing the size into the constructor? – AJG85 Mar 10 '11 at 21:55
    
In the comments I marked the second invocation of CopyClear() as #2. – genpfault Mar 10 '11 at 22:12
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Updated answer

If I understand your intent correctly, this will do the trick:

template< typename T >
class Foo
{
private:
    friend class FooHelper;
    size_t sz;
};

class FooHelper
{
public:
    template< typename T >
    static Foo<T> Size(const T& arg)
    {
        Foo<T> ret;
        ret.sz = arg.size();
        return ret;
    }

    template< typename T >
    static Foo<T> HalfSize(const T& arg)
    {
        Foo<T> ret;
        ret.sz = arg.size() / 2;
        return ret;
    }
};

This then compiles:

int main( int argc, char** argv )
{
    vector<double> vec;
    vec.push_back(1);

    Foo<vector<double>> a_foo = FooHelper::HalfSize( vec );
}
share|improve this answer
    
Valid for the given example, however, I guess OP wants to use T in his class, rather than only the constructors. Also, I am not aware of any solution to the actual question, so it might indeed be not possible the way you want it to be (I may be mistaken). – dialer Mar 10 '11 at 21:59
    
Foo is also templated. – genpfault Mar 10 '11 at 22:00
    
@dialer, @genpfault: In that case, he can create a template<T> class Bar and instantiate objects of it to be returned from the Foo static methods. In effect this would bring back the issue of repeating the template argument type, but in this case it would be repeating T inside Foo (which can be considered "library code"). Anyhow, the if the OP provides more information we can adapt our answers. – Jon Mar 10 '11 at 22:02
1  
@genpfault: I updated the answer as per my last comment. Please see if it's suitable for you. – Jon Mar 10 '11 at 22:07
    
That worked great, thanks! – genpfault Mar 10 '11 at 22:15

I don't think there is a DRY problem, think of it as a language restriction. If you have a Class Foo without template but you want to create a new object from a static method, you'd have to do something like:

Foo a_foo = Foo::HalfSize(something);

and there's of course the Foo repeated twice.

So, since here the full Class name is Foo< vector<double> >, it's logical to get the static method from Foo< vector<double> >::HalfSize(), since that's the C++ way.

share|improve this answer

In addition to @Jon's answer, see std::make_pair and its relationship to std::pair, if you need the class itself to be a template.

share|improve this answer
1  
And also, make_shared and shared_ptr. I consider it an idiom to use template functions to create template objects, to benefit from type deduction. – Matthieu M. Mar 11 '11 at 7:26

If you can use C++0x features, the auto keyword would help. Is there a reason that Size() and HalfSize() need to be static methods? If you provide methods to mutate sz you can do this:

template<class T>
Foo<T> HalfSize(const T& arg)
{
    Foo<T> ret;
    ret.setSz(arg.size() / 2); // or similar
    return ret;
}

and then #1 is a little more attainable.

share|improve this answer
    
No C++0x for me I'm afraid :( – genpfault Mar 10 '11 at 22:05

C++1x to the rescue:

auto a_foo = Foo::HalfSize<vector<double>>( vec );

And, yes, the two closing >> are parsed as > > in C++1x.

Probably already available with a compiler near you.

share|improve this answer
    
No C++1x for me I'm afraid :( – genpfault Mar 10 '11 at 22:04
    
@genpfault: What compiler are you using? – sbi Mar 10 '11 at 22:06
    
Visual C++ 2008. – genpfault Mar 10 '11 at 22:08
    
@genpfault: Ah, then you'd have to switch to the next version. VS2010 can do that. – sbi Mar 10 '11 at 22:48

This is technically OK and is possibly the simplest answer to your end question:

    Foo< vector<double> > a_foo = a_foo.CopyClear( vec );

It's technically OK because CopyClear is a static member function.

And there is no technical problem, e.g. you could use a typedef instead. Or just put those static member functions at namespace scope, as function templates. Or in some helper class, as someone has already suggested.

But even though there is no technical problem, the design is less than ideal; it is, to put it bluntly (sorry), a bit worse than meaningless.

For example, in CopyClear, why are you copying a vector and then discarding the copy result? You only need to create an empty vector, of the type your code knows.

And for example, why are you introducing side-effect machinery?

Side-effects are to be avoided and removed, not introduced.

Cheers & hth.,

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