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I've put together a quick test using the DotNetZip library which opens a zip file full of .bmp files and converts them to .jpg format.

Prior to this I was writing all of the files to a folder, converting them, saving out the jpg files & then removing the original bmp files, which got messy.

I'm no looking to unzip them in memory first, convert to jpg & then save.

The code works, but just isn't that quick. Can anyone give me any pointers as to what I can do to improve the code please? Also, Would threading help?

string zipToUnpack = "c:\\test\\1000.zip";
string unpackDirectory = "c:\\temp\\";

string f = string.Empty;
Bitmap bm;
MemoryStream ms;

using (ZipFile zip = ZipFile.Read(zipToUnpack))
{                 
  foreach (ZipEntry e in zip)
  {
    if (e.FileName.ToLower().IndexOf(".bmp") > 0)
    {
      ms = new MemoryStream();
      e.Extract(ms);
      try
      {
        bm = new Bitmap(ms);                              
        f = unpackDirectory + e.FileName.ToLower().Replace(".bmp", ".jpg");
        bm.Save(f, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Jpeg);
      }
      catch (Exception ex)
      {
        Console.WriteLine("File: " + e.FileName + " " + ex.ToString());
      }
      ms.Dispose();
    }
  }
}

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
What is the slow part? dijksterhuis.org/timing-function-performance-stopwatch-class should help find this out. –  Paul McCowat Mar 10 '11 at 22:57
    
Thanks for the stopwatch stuff. It's converting 1000 images in 1 minute. I was just wondering if anyone had any ideas to improve the overall design. I'm pretty sure it is the converting to jpg that is the slow part. I'm not sure if threading will help or even if I can apply it in this case? –  StuffandBlah Mar 10 '11 at 23:09
    
I don't see how you'd apply threading to this. A zip needs to be read sequentially, so without your initial solution that first unzips and then converts you can't divide the load across the threads. And even then, threading is about letting the cpu do more work. But if your harddrive can't keep up, threading is no use. –  Vincent Vancalbergh Mar 10 '11 at 23:34
    
That's where the stopwatch is usefull if the bottleneck is in bitmap reading, jpeg creation or even jpeg writing threading will help. If the bottleneck is the unzip part you need a zip library able to do it and a zip file not compressed in a "solid" archive –  Julien Roncaglia Mar 10 '11 at 23:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In general, DotNetZip is single-threaded. You can open multiple archives in multiple threads, but each archive in only one thread.

If you want to enlist multiple CPUs or cores, then I can suggest calling QueueUserWorkItem for the part where you convert the data in the MemoryStream into a jpg.

The call to ZipEntry.Extract() needs to be done on the same thread, for all entries. This is because the Zipfile maintains a single FileStream for all read access, and multiple threads extracting entries will cause file pointer arithmetic errors.

So, something like this:

    public class State
    {
        public string FileName;
        public MemoryStream stream;
    }

    public void Run()
    {
        string unpackDirectory = "c:\\temp\\";
        string zipToUnpack = "c:\\test\\1000.zip";

        var ConvertImage = new WaitCallback( (o) => {
                State s = o as State;
                try
                {
                    var bm = new Bitmap(s.stream);
                    var f = unpackDirectory + s.FileName.ToLower().Replace(".bmp", ".jpg");
                    bm.Save(f, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Jpeg);
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("File: " + s.FileName + " " + ex.ToString());
                }
            });


        using (ZipFile zip = ZipFile.Read(zipToUnpack))
        {
            foreach (ZipEntry e in zip)
            {
                if (e.FileName.ToLower().IndexOf(".bmp") > 0)
                {
                    var ms = new MemoryStream();
                    e.Extract(ms);
                    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem ( ConvertImage, 
                                                   new State {
                                                       FileName = e.FileName, stream = ms }
                                                   });                      
                }
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Aw, shucks. Glad to help. –  Cheeso Mar 24 '11 at 23:54

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