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I'm trying to connect to an API that uses a self-signed SSL certificate. I'm doing so using .NET's HttpWebRequest and HttpWebResponse objects. And I'm getting an exception that:

The underlying connection was closed: Could not establish trust relationship for the SSL/TLS secure channel.

I understand what this means. And I understand why .NET feels it should warn me and close the connection. But in this case, I'd like to just connect to the API anyway, man-in-the-middle attacks be damned.

So, how do I go about adding an exception for this self-signed certificate? Or is the approach to tell HttpWebRequest/Response not to validate the certificate at all? How would I do that?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 37 down vote accepted

@Domster: that works, but you might want to enforce a bit of security by checking if the certificate hash matches what you expect. So an expanded version looks a bit like this (based on some live code we're using):

static readonly byte[] apiCertHash = { 0xZZ, 0xYY, ....};

/// <summary>
/// Somewhere in your application's startup/init sequence...
/// </summary>
void InitPhase()
{
    // Override automatic validation of SSL server certificates.
    ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback =
           ValidateServerCertficate;
}

/// <summary>
/// Validates the SSL server certificate.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="sender">An object that contains state information for this
/// validation.</param>
/// <param name="cert">The certificate used to authenticate the remote party.</param>
/// <param name="chain">The chain of certificate authorities associated with the
/// remote certificate.</param>
/// <param name="sslPolicyErrors">One or more errors associated with the remote
/// certificate.</param>
/// <returns>Returns a boolean value that determines whether the specified
/// certificate is accepted for authentication; true to accept or false to
/// reject.</returns>
private static bool ValidateServerCertficate(
        object sender,
        X509Certificate cert,
        X509Chain chain,
        SslPolicyErrors sslPolicyErrors)
{
    if (sslPolicyErrors == SslPolicyErrors.None)
    {
        // Good certificate.
        return true;
    }

    log.DebugFormat("SSL certificate error: {0}", sslPolicyErrors);

    bool certMatch = false; // Assume failure
    byte[] certHash = cert.GetCertHash();
    if (certHash.Length == apiCertHash.Length)
    {
        certMatch = true; // Now assume success.
        for (int idx = 0; idx < certHash.Length; idx++)
        {
            if (certHash[idx] != apiCertHash[idx])
            {
                certMatch = false; // No match
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    // Return true => allow unauthenticated server,
    //        false => disallow unauthenticated server.
    return certMatch;
}
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2  
Any comment by the down-voter? –  devstuff Mar 11 '10 at 4:26
    
Probably someone who preferred the correct way below. Anyway, this hack works in a pinch, but you probably shouldn't be coding these kinds of exceptions in... either just disable the checking all together (via the suggestion directly below) or actually instruct your computer to trust the certificate... –  BrainSlugs83 Jul 12 '11 at 22:00
3  
@BrainSlugs83: Disabling is certainly an option too, but adding the cert to the machine-level root authorities store can only be done by administrators. My solution works either way. –  devstuff Jul 17 '11 at 8:54
    
And I fully understand that, but you asked, and that's still my guess as to why someone down-voted your answer. And regardless of it being more work, IMHO wgthom's answer below is still the most correct one. –  BrainSlugs83 Aug 19 '11 at 2:08
1  
This is the best way to do this. If you remove the check against sslPolicyErrors, you can actually ensure the API certificate is always the expected one. One thing to note is that the certificate fingerprint in the code above is a const byte array. This will not compile as written. Try a static readonly byte array instead. The compiler chokes on this because it requires the new() operator. –  Centijo Apr 22 at 20:07

Turns out, if you just want to disable certificate validation altogether, you can change the ServerCertificateValidationCallback on the ServicePointManager, like so:

ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback = delegate { return true; };

This will validate all certificates (including invalid, expired or self-signed ones).

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2  
Perfect for some quick testing against development machines. Thanks. –  Nate Jun 28 '11 at 17:31
2  
@codeulike AppDomain –  Domster Aug 18 '11 at 22:14
15  
But be carefull! The RL experience shows that this development hacks often makes it's way into the release product: The most dangerous code in the world –  Doomjunky Oct 25 '12 at 18:12
3  
This is a hack useful in development so putting a #if DEBUG #endif statement around it is the least you should do to make this safer and stop this ending up in production. –  AndyD Apr 12 '13 at 14:42
2  
Unless this guy removes this answer, we will see a funny fact that a wrong answer receives far more votes than the correct one. –  Lex Li Apr 14 at 12:52

Add the self signed cert to the Local Computer Trusted Root Certification Authorities

You can import the cert by running the MMC as Administrator.

How to: View Certificates with the MMC Snap-in

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3  
IMHO this is the most correct way; people are just too lazy so they code in special exceptions for things they probably shouldn't. –  BrainSlugs83 Jul 12 '11 at 21:58
4  
Does that method work for Windows Mobile 6.5? How about 7? In my case, I didn't want to have to add a local certificate to every mobile device I planned to run a development version on. A good exception, in this case, makes deployment a ton easier. Laziness or efficiency, you tell me. –  Domster Aug 19 '11 at 8:07
3  
@domster You're using SSL certs for a reason - to verify endpoints. If you develop code that specifically works around that, you're not testing it properly and risk leaking that code into a live environment. If installing a cert on the client is really too much work, why not just pay for a cert from an issuer trusted by all the devices? –  Basic Nov 22 '12 at 10:57
1  
@Basic If I remember this specific case, I would have needed several wildcard certs (there were half a dozen TLDs it was connecting to, all under our control). That's a hard-to-justify cost for a development environment. In this case, the only code being "worked around" and not tested is that an exception is not thrown where it otherwise would be. You should be testing that specific exception path regardless of whether you're using this workaround. And, finally, if you can't keep development code out of production, you have much bigger problems than SSL validation. –  Domster Dec 14 '12 at 9:52

The scope of the validation callback used in Domster's answer can be limited to a specific request using the sender parameter on the ServerCertificateValidationCallback delegate. The following simple scope class uses this technique to temporarily wire up a validation callback that only executes for a given request object.

public class ServerCertificateValidationScope : IDisposable
{
    private readonly RemoteCertificateValidationCallback _callback;

    public ServerCertificateValidationScope(object request,
        RemoteCertificateValidationCallback callback)
    {
        var previous = ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback;
        _callback = (sender, certificate, chain, errors) =>
            {
                if (sender == request)
                {
                    return callback(sender, certificate, chain, errors);
                }
                if (previous != null)
                {
                    return previous(sender, certificate, chain, errors);
                }
                return errors == SslPolicyErrors.None;
            };
        ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback += _callback;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback -= _callback;
    }
}

The above class can be used to ignore all certificate errors for a specific request as follows:

var request = WebRequest.Create(uri);
using (new ServerCertificateValidationScope(request, delegate { return true; }))
{
    request.GetResponse();
}
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5  
This answer needs more up-votes :) It's the most reasonable answer to skip certificate validation for a single request using an HttpWebRequest object. –  MikeJansen Oct 16 '12 at 19:28
    
I added this and I'm still getting The request was aborted: Could not create SSL/TLS secure channel. –  vikingben Jan 15 at 18:50
    
This doesn't really solve the problem in a multi-threaded environment. –  Hans May 23 at 20:00

Note, that in .NET 4.5 you can override SSL validation per HttpWebRequest itself (and not via global delegate which affects all requests):

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.net.httpwebrequest.servercertificatevalidationcallback.aspx

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Just building on answer from devstuff to include subject and issuer...comments welcome...

public class SelfSignedCertificateValidator
{
    private class CertificateAttributes
    {
        public string Subject { get; private set; }
        public string Issuer { get; private set; }
        public string Thumbprint { get; private set; }

        public CertificateAttributes(string subject, string issuer, string thumbprint)
        {
            Subject = subject;
            Issuer = issuer;                
            Thumbprint = thumbprint.Trim(
                new char[] { '\u200e', '\u200f' } // strip any lrt and rlt markers from copy/paste
                ); 
        }

        public bool IsMatch(X509Certificate cert)
        {
            bool subjectMatches = Subject.Replace(" ", "").Equals(cert.Subject.Replace(" ", ""), StringComparison.InvariantCulture);
            bool issuerMatches = Issuer.Replace(" ", "").Equals(cert.Issuer.Replace(" ", ""), StringComparison.InvariantCulture);
            bool thumbprintMatches = Thumbprint == String.Join(" ", cert.GetCertHash().Select(h => h.ToString("x2")));
            return subjectMatches && issuerMatches && thumbprintMatches; 
        }
    }

    private readonly List<CertificateAttributes> __knownSelfSignedCertificates = new List<CertificateAttributes> {
        new CertificateAttributes(  // can paste values from "view cert" dialog
            "CN = subject.company.int", 
            "CN = issuer.company.int", 
            "f6 23 16 3d 5a d8 e5 1e 13 58 85 0a 34 9f d6 d3 c8 23 a8 f4") 
    };       

    private static bool __createdSingleton = false;

    public SelfSignedCertificateValidator()
    {
        lock (this)
        {
            if (__createdSingleton)
                throw new Exception("Only a single instance can be instanciated.");

            // Hook in validation of SSL server certificates.  
            ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback += ValidateServerCertficate;

            __createdSingleton = true;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Validates the SSL server certificate.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sender">An object that contains state information for this
    /// validation.</param>
    /// <param name="cert">The certificate used to authenticate the remote party.</param>
    /// <param name="chain">The chain of certificate authorities associated with the
    /// remote certificate.</param>
    /// <param name="sslPolicyErrors">One or more errors associated with the remote
    /// certificate.</param>
    /// <returns>Returns a boolean value that determines whether the specified
    /// certificate is accepted for authentication; true to accept or false to
    /// reject.</returns>
    private bool ValidateServerCertficate(
        object sender,
        X509Certificate cert,
        X509Chain chain,
        SslPolicyErrors sslPolicyErrors)
    {
        if (sslPolicyErrors == SslPolicyErrors.None)
            return true;   // Good certificate.

        Dbg.WriteLine("SSL certificate error: {0}", sslPolicyErrors);
        return __knownSelfSignedCertificates.Any(c => c.IsMatch(cert));            
    }
}
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One thing to keep in mind is that having the ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback does not seem to mean that the CRL check and servername validation are not done, it only provides a means to override their result. So your service might still take a while to get a CRL, you'll only know afterwards that it failed some checks.

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