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"a004-1b","North","at006754"
"a004-1c","south","atytgh0"
"a004-1d","east","atrthh"
"a010-1a","midwest","atyu"
"a010-1b","south","rfg67"

I want to print the first column and the second column without any extra character I want eliminate all ("", and the third column) Thanks in advance

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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted
awk -F'^"|","|"$' '{print $2,$3}' ./infile.csv

The above script will even handle fields that have embedded double quotes or commas. The only downside (if you can call it that) is that the first field starts at $2

Proof of Concept

$ awk -F'^"|","|"$' '{print $2,$3}' ./infile.csv
a004-1b North

a004-1c south

a010-1a midwest

a010-1b south
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better than mine. in my defense, I almost never use awk or sed any more :^\ –  jcomeau_ictx Mar 10 '11 at 23:53
1  
I must confess most of my awk and sed usage is right here on SO =) –  SiegeX Mar 10 '11 at 23:55

You need GNU Awk 4 for this to work:

$ gawk -vFPAT='[^",]+' '{print $1,$2}'

I love this new "field pattern" feature. It's my new hammer and everything is a nail. Read up on it at http://www.gnu.org/software/gawk/manual/html_node/Splitting-By-Content.html

(Written this way it doesn't account for embedded commas or quotes, because the question implies this is not needed.)

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If you're using awk for this, why put a Perl tag on it?

In Perl:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Data::Dumper;

# Make Data::Dumper pretty
$Data::Dumper::Sortkeys = 1;
$Data::Dumper::Indent   = 1;

# Set maximum depth for Data::Dumper, zero means unlimited
local $Data::Dumper::Maxdepth = 0;

use Text::CSV;

my $csv = Text::CSV->new();
while( my $row = $csv->getline( \*DATA )){
  print 'row: ', Dumper $row;
}

__DATA__
"a004-1b","North","at006754"
"a004-1c","south","atytgh0""a004-1d","east","atrthh"
"a010-1a","midwest","atyu"
"a010-1b","south","rfg67"
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awk -F'\"|\,' '{print $2,$5}' sample
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You don't need to escape out the quote or the comma, awk -F'"|,' will suffice. But like some of the other answers, this does not work with fields that have embedded quotes or commas. Instead, use awk -F'^"|","|"$ which takes care off all the corner cases. –  SiegeX Mar 11 '11 at 17:03

Not handling embedded double quotes:

sed -e 's/^"\([^"]*\)","\([^"]*\)".*/\1 \2/'

To handle them:

sed -n -e 's/^"//;s/"$//;s/","/ /;s/","/\n/;P'

The above works even for a 1 or 2 field input.

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If you want it "pure" awk or sed, this won't fit the bill, but otherwise it works:

awk -F, '{print $1 " " $2}' | tr -d '"'
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Although it does not handle embedded quotes or commas, the latter being not too out of ordinary in my experience (unfortunately). –  SiegeX Mar 10 '11 at 23:53
1  
yeah, well with any amount of complexity it makes sense to switch to Python or something else with built-in CSV support. –  jcomeau_ictx Mar 10 '11 at 23:56
    
cut -d "," -f 1,2 --output-delimiter=" "| tr -d '"' would do the same, so awk not needed here. –  jfgagne Aug 17 '11 at 15:39
    
@jfgagne, quite true but the OP specified awk or sed. personally I prefer cut. –  jcomeau_ictx Aug 17 '11 at 16:07

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