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The following code works ok on IE and Firefox, but Chrome hates it (it runs but is really laggy). I am sure it could be made more browser friendly, but how? itemPlaceholder is hundreds of 100x100 floated divs (eg image placeholders). I'm using jquery 1.4.4 and Chrome v10.0.648.127.

$(function () {

   ReplaceVisible();
   $(this).scroll(function () {
      ReplaceVisible();
   });
});

function ReplaceVisible() {
    $('.itemPlaceholder').each(function (index) {
        if (HasBeenScrolledTo(this)) {
            $itemPlaceholder = $(this);

            $itemPlaceholder.replaceWith('<img src="bicycle.jpg" />');
        }
        else {
            return false;
        }
    });
}

function HasBeenScrolledTo(elem) {
    var docViewTop = $(window).scrollTop();
    var docViewBottom = docViewTop + $(window).height();
    var elemTop = $(elem).offset().top;

    return elemTop < docViewBottom;
}

Edit: Replaced append with replaceWith otherwise we get lots of images appended to the same element.

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2 Answers 2

This runs slowly in chrome because chrome fires the onscroll event continuously as the page is scrolled (IE and firefox only fire onscroll when scrolling stops).

You could improve chrome's performance in this case by queuing up the invocations of ReplaceVisible and only allowing it to be fired once in a given time period. An example of queuing invocations is available here (https://github.com/tilleryj/rio/blob/master/public/javascripts/lib/delayed_task.js)

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2  
And straight from the horse's mouth: ejohn.org/blog/learning-from-twitter –  mu is too short Mar 11 '11 at 4:59
    
Hmm, chrome does produce more scroll events but its not orders of magnatude more. The issue seems to be caused by editing the DOM (append). Remove that line, and the scrolling is smooth. –  Sprintstar Mar 11 '11 at 9:18

I had a similar problem where I had to detect resize events, which as you'd expect fired an awful lot of them and locked up the browser. I haven't tested it though, so please report back if it works. :)

$(function () {
   replaceVisible();
   $(this).scroll( replaceVisible );
});

var replaceVisible = (function(){
    var last_scroll = null;    // Last time we scrolled
    var paused = false; // We've paused scrolling
    var delay = 1000; // Delay in between acting on the scroll (ms).
    return function(){
        if( paused ) return;
        if( new Date() - last_scroll < delay ){
            setTimeout( function(){ paused = false; replaceVisible(); }, delay )
            paused = true;
        }
        $('.itemPlaceholder').filter(HasBeenScrolledTo)
            .replaceWith('<img src="bicycle.jpg" />');
        last_scroll = new Date();
    }
})();

function HasBeenScrolledTo(index) {
    var docViewTop = $(window).scrollTop();
    var docViewBottom = docViewTop + $(window).height();
    var elemTop = $(this).offset().top;
    return elemTop < docViewBottom;
}
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Thanks for yor code, i learnt a lot from it, and i'm sure its reduced the load on the browsers. However Chrome still doesn't like the DOM editing.. :( –  Sprintstar Mar 11 '11 at 9:55
    
You could try loading everything but with the <img> hidden and then calling show() when you want it to be visible? You'll have to post a test-page if you want more precise help since I'm unsure why Chrome would have problem with the code right now. –  Kit Sunde Mar 11 '11 at 15:56

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