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I should state that I'm not asking about specific implementation details (yet), but just a general overview of what's going on. I understand the basic concept behind a socket, and need clarification on the process as a whole. My (probably very wrong) understanding is currently this:

A socket is constantly listening for clients that want to connect (in its own thread). When a connection occurs, an event is raised that spawns another thread to perform the connection process. During the connection process the client is assigned it's own socket in which to communicate with the server. The server then waits for data from the client and when data arrives an event is raised which spawns a thread to read the data from a stream into a buffer.

My questions are:

How off is my understanding?

Does each client socket require it's own thread to listen for data on?

How is data routed to the correct client socket? Is this something taken care of by the guts of TCP/UDP/kernel?

In this threaded environment, what kind of data is typically being shared, and what are the points of contention?

Any clarifications and additional explanation would be greatly appreciated.

EDIT:

Regarding the question about what data is typically shared and points of contention, I realize this is more of an implementation detail than it is a question regarding general process of accepting connections and sending/receiving data. I had looked at a couple implementations (SuperSocket and Kayak) and noticed some synchronization for things like session cache and reusable buffer pools. Feel free to ignore this question. I've appreciated all your feedback.

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Have you read any of Comer's books yet? cs.purdue.edu/homes/dec/netbooks.html Please buy and read one or two of them. This is thoroughly covered. –  S.Lott Mar 11 '11 at 0:23
    
"In this threaded environment, what kind of data is typically being shared" The answer is "all data is shared by threaded applications". That's the definition. Why ask? "and what are the points of contention?" Please clarify this; "points of contention" could mean anything. " –  S.Lott Mar 11 '11 at 11:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

One thread per connection is bad design (not scalable, overly complex) but unfortunately way too common.

A socket server works more or less like this:

  • A listening socket is setup to accept connections, and added to a socketset
  • The socket set is checked for events
  • If the listening socket has pending connections, new sockets are created by accepting the connections, and then added to the socket set
  • If a connected socket has events, the relevant IO functions are called
  • The socket set is checked for events again

This happens in one thread, you can easily handle thousands of connected sockets in a single thread, and there's few valid reasons for making this more complex by introducing threads.

while running
    select on socketset
    for each socket with events
        if socket is listener
            accept new connected socket
            add new socket to socketset
        else if socket is connection
            if event is readable
                read data
                process data
            else if event is writable
                write queued data
            else if event is closed connection
                remove socket from socketset
            end
        end
    done
done

The IP stack takes care of all the details of which packets go to what "socket" in which order. Seen from the applications point of view, a socket represents a reliable ordered byte stream (TCP) or an unreliable unordered sequence of packets(UDP)

EDIT: In response to updated question.

I don't know either of the libraries you mention, but on the concepts you mention:

  • A session cache typically keeps data associated with a client, and can reuse this data for multiple connections. This makes sense when your application logic requires state information, but it's a layer higher than the actual networking end. In the above sample, the session cache would be used by the "process data" part.
  • Buffer pools are also an easy and often effective optimization of a high-traffic server. The concept is very easy to implement, instead of allocating/deallocating space for storing data you read/write, you fetch a preallocated buffer from a pool, use it, then return it to a pool. This avoids the (sometimes relatively expensive) backend allocation/deallocation mechanisms. This is not directly related to networking, you can just as well use buffer pools for e.g. something that reads chunks of files and process them.
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This was exactly the type of explanation I was looking for. Much appreciated. –  w.brian Mar 11 '11 at 6:58
1  
So how does one thread read data from multiple connected sockets? Would you constantly iterate all connected sockets and perform a synchronous read operation for each, consuming data in each stream (if any) and then move onto the next? –  w.brian Mar 12 '11 at 1:53
    
No, use a mechanism that checks "which socket has something readable", such as select(), poll(), epoll(), kqueue(), WSAEventSelect() - pick one from your OS. Then iterate and read data for the sockets that do have something to read –  Erik Mar 12 '11 at 11:26
    
Updated answer. –  Erik Mar 12 '11 at 11:41
    
Erik, you are awesome. Thanks so much. –  w.brian Mar 12 '11 at 20:33

How off is my understanding?

Pretty far.

Does each client socket require it's own thread to listen for data on?

No.

How is data routed to the correct client socket? Is this something taken care of by the guts of TCP/UDP/kernel?

TCP/IP is a number of layers of protocol. There's no "kernel" to it. It's pieces, each with a separate API to the other pieces.

The IP Address is handled in on place.

The port # is handled in another place.

The IP addresses are matched up with MAC addresses to identify a particular host. The port # is what ties a TCP (or UDP) socket to a particular piece of application software.

In this threaded environment, what kind of data is typically being shared, and what are the points of contention?

What threaded environment?

Data sharing? What?

Contention? The physical channel is the number one point of contention. (Ethernet, for example depends on collision-detection.) After that, well, every part of the computer system is a scarce resource shared by multiple applications and is a point of contention.

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