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I'm trying to display an iframe in my mobile web application, but I'm having trouble restricting the size of the iframe to the dimensions of the iPhone screen. The height and width attributes on the iframe element seem to have no effect, strangely. Surrounding it with a div manages to constrain it, but then I'm unable to scroll within the iframe.

Has anyone tackled iframes in mobile safari before? Any ideas where to start?

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could you post some code? –  William Niu Mar 14 '11 at 1:08
    
Without knowing what he's up to, it's rather pointless to start arguing if it's the right thing to do or not. There are use cases where iframes are required. –  crappish Mar 4 '13 at 9:35
    
If you have access to the iframed page you can do this: stackoverflow.com/questions/19667785/… –  user1470118 Oct 30 '13 at 17:12
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9 Answers

Yeah, you can't constrain the iframe itself with height and width. You should put a div around it. If you control the content in the iframe, you can put some JS within the iframe content that will tell the parent to scroll the div when the touch event is received.

like this:

The JS:

setTimeout(function () {
var startY = 0;
var startX = 0;
var b = document.body;
b.addEventListener('touchstart', function (event) {
    parent.window.scrollTo(0, 1);
    startY = event.targetTouches[0].pageY;
    startX = event.targetTouches[0].pageX;
});
b.addEventListener('touchmove', function (event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    var posy = event.targetTouches[0].pageY;
    var h = parent.document.getElementById("scroller");
    var sty = h.scrollTop;

    var posx = event.targetTouches[0].pageX;
    var stx = h.scrollLeft;
    h.scrollTop = sty - (posy - startY);
    h.scrollLeft = stx - (posx - startX);
    startY = posy;
    startX = posx;
});
}, 1000);

The HTML:

<div id="scroller" style="height: 400px; width: 100%; overflow: auto;">
<iframe height="100%" id="iframe" scrolling="no" width="100%" id="iframe" src="url" />
</div>

If you don't control the iframe content, you can use an overlay over the iframe in a similar manner, but then you can't interact with the iframe contents other than to scroll it - so you can't, for example, click links in the iframe.

It used to be that you could use two fingers to scroll within an iframe, but that doesn't work anymore.

Update: iOS 6 broke this solution for us. I've been attempting to get a new fix for it, but nothing has worked yet. In addition, it is no longer possible to debug javascript on the device since they introduced Remote Web Inspector, which requires a Mac to use.

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Do you have a working example of the above code online? –  testndtv May 25 '11 at 18:18
    
As I am unable to get the above code working on my page.. –  testndtv May 26 '11 at 12:47
    
Internal only. What problem are you having? –  Case May 26 '11 at 18:39
    
Ok sure..i have a child iframe called on the main page..this child iframe does not scroll within the main page..you can check out ipad.atwebpages.com/table/try2.html –  testndtv May 27 '11 at 3:46
4  
Your example above worked for me, but the scrolling jittered like crazy because you're using event.pageX and pageY, which includes scrolling info (which you are then changing, which causes shakes). Switching to using event.screenX and screenY produces smooth scrolling for me. –  Martamius May 17 '12 at 0:40
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If the iFrame content is not yours then the solution below will not work.

With Android all you need to do is to surround the iframe with a DIV and set the height on the div to document.documentElement.clientHeight. IOS, however, is a different animal. Although I have not yet tried Sharon's solution it does seem like a good solution. I did find a simpler solution but it only works with IOS 5.+.

Surround your iframe element with a DIV (lets call it scroller), set the height of the DIV and make sure that the new DIV has the following styling:

$('#scroller').css({'overflow' : 'auto', '-webkit-overflow-scrolling' : 'touch'});

This alone will work but you will notice that in most implementations the content in the iframe goes blank when scrolling and is basically rendered useless. My understanding is that this behavior has been reported as a bug to Apple as early as iOS 5.0. To get around that problem, find the body element in the iframe and add -webkit-transform', 'translate3d(0, 0, 0) like so:

$('#contentIframe').contents().find('body').css('-webkit-transform', 'translate3d(0, 0, 0)');

If your app or iframe is heavy on memory usage you might get a hitchy scroll for which you might need to use Sharon's solution.

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I have put @Sharon's code together into the following, which works for me on the iPad with two-finger scrolling. The only thing you should have to change to get it working is the src attribute on the iframe (I used a PDF document).

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <title>Pdf Scrolling in mobile Safari</title>
</head>
<body>
<div id="scroller" style="height: 400px; width: 100%; overflow: auto;">
<iframe height="100%" id="iframe" scrolling="no" width="100%" id="iframe" src="data/testdocument.pdf" />
</div>
<script type="text/javascript">
    setTimeout(function () {
        var startY = 0;
        var startX = 0;
        var b = document.body;
        b.addEventListener('touchstart', function (event) {
            parent.window.scrollTo(0, 1);
            startY = event.targetTouches[0].pageY;
            startX = event.targetTouches[0].pageX;
        });
        b.addEventListener('touchmove', function (event) {
            event.preventDefault();
            var posy = event.targetTouches[0].pageY;
            var h = parent.document.getElementById("scroller");
            var sty = h.scrollTop;

            var posx = event.targetTouches[0].pageX;
            var stx = h.scrollLeft;
            h.scrollTop = sty - (posy - startY);
            h.scrollLeft = stx - (posx - startX);
            startY = posy;
            startX = posx;
        });
    }, 1000);
    </script>
</body>
</html>
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hello, i read somewhere that 2 finger scrolling was removed some few updates ago, is this solution still working for you? –  somdow Apr 9 '12 at 18:00
    
Yes I can confirm that it works, I'm using it with the jQuery colorbox plugin. It works with one finger scrolling, although there is no scrollbar. –  Ian Stanway Jul 6 '12 at 8:28
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The solution is to use Scrolling="no" on the iframe.

That's it.

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I don't know if this is broken in the latest iOS but for the life of me, I can't get this to work with dynamically created iframes –  crappish Mar 4 '13 at 9:40
    
To be more precise - With scrolling="no" and width:100% the iframe still resizes it self. Only when I set width to inherit or specific pixel value, does it stop resizing. –  crappish Mar 4 '13 at 10:28
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Another option is to pull the content out of the iframe and put it in a div. Again, only if the content is on the same domain though.

Here's an article I wrote on the subject:

http://www.flexmls.com/developers/2011/04/13/ipad-and-single-finger-scrolling-in-flexmls/

The iPad tries to expand the iframe to match the content of whatever is inside it. If you set scrolling="no" you can cause the iframe to respect the proper dimensions. This is similar to overflow:hidden. However, it's pointless for the most part because you still wont be able to scroll it.

I've used the scrolling="no" method on a page where I wanted to make sure the dimensions of an iframe stayed properly adjusted to match the ipad's screen size. The content inside it also did the same thing, so I didn't have to worry about scrolling. It actually saved my ass though because without it, using jQuery(window).height will give the height of the iframe instead of the height of the window. This was especially helpful when dealing with orientation change.

Edit: if only they still allowed two finger scrolling. There's a chance scrolling="no" might have worked perfectly! (on the off chance that scrolling="no" doesn't also disable two finger scrolling)

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Sharon's method worked for me, however when a link in the iframe is followed and then the browser back button is pressed, the cached version of the page is loaded and the iframe is no longer scrollable. To overcome this I used some code to refresh the page as follows:

if ('ontouchstart' in document.documentElement)
     {
        document.getElementById('Scrolling').src = document.getElementById('SCrolling').src;
    }
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I implemented the following and it works well. Basically, I set the body dimensions according to the size of the iFrame content. It does mean that our non-iFrame menu can be scrolled off the screen, but otherwise, this makes our sites functional with iPad and iPhone. "workbox" is the ID of our iFrame.

// Configure for scrolling peculiarities of iPad and iPhone

if (navigator.userAgent.indexOf('iPhone') != -1 || navigator.userAgent.indexOf('iPad') != -1)
{
    document.body.style.width = "100%";
    document.body.style.height = "100%";
    $("#workbox").load(function (){ // Wait until iFrame content is loaded before checking dimensions of the content
        iframeWidth = $("#workbox").contents().width();
        if (iframeWidth > 400)
           document.body.style.width = (iframeWidth + 182) + 'px';

        iframeHeight = $("#workbox").contents().height();
        if (iframeHeight>200)
            document.body.style.height = iframeHeight + 'px';
     });
}
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Purely using MSchimpf and Ahmad's code, I made adjustments so I could have the iframe within a div, therefore keeping a header and footer for back button and branding on my page. Updated code:

<script type="text/javascript">
    $("#webview").bind('pagebeforeshow', function(event){
        $("#iframe").attr('src',cwebview);
    });

    if (navigator.userAgent.indexOf('iPhone') != -1 || navigator.userAgent.indexOf('iPad') != -1)
    {
        $("#webview-content").css("width","100%");
        $("#webview-content").css("height","100%");
        $("#iframe").load(function (){ // Wait until iFrame content is loaded before checking dimensions of the content
            iframeWidth = $("#iframe").contents().width();
            if (iframeWidth > 400)
               $("#webview-content").css("width",(iframeWidth + 182) + 'px');

            iframeHeight = $("#iframe").contents().height();
            if (iframeHeight>200)
                $("#webview-content").css("height",iframeHeight + 'px');
         });
    }       
</script>  

and the html

<div class="header" data-role="header" data-position="fixed">
</div>

<div id="webview-content" data-role="content" style="height:380px;">
    <iframe id="iframe"></iframe>   
</div><!-- /content -->

<div class="footer" data-role="footer" data-position="fixed">
</div><!-- /footer -->   
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Here is a component I've end up using in my app. Done with a help of YouTube iFrame API. This works with Sencha Toucha wrapped with Cordova, but should work via mobile Safari as well.

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