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Email field:

<label for="job_client_email">Email: </label> 
<input type="email" name="job[client_email]" id="job_client_email">

looks like this:

without_error

But, if the email validation fails, it becomes:

<div class="field_with_errors">
  <label for="job_client_email">Email: </label>
</div> 
<div class="field_with_errors">
  <input type="email" value="wrong email" name="job[client_email]" id="job_client_email">
</div>

which looks like this:

with_error

How could I avoid this appearance change ?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 158 down vote accepted

You should override ActionView::Base.field_error_proc. It's currently defined as this within ActionView::Base:

 @@field_error_proc = Proc.new{ |html_tag, instance| 
   "<div class=\"field_with_errors\">#{html_tag}</div>".html_safe
 }

You can override it by putting this in your application's class inside config/application.rb:

config.action_view.field_error_proc = Proc.new { |html_tag, instance| 
  html_tag
}

Restart rails server for this change to take effect.

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1  
One little question: Why both the label and the input are wrapped ? How Rails decide what to wrap ? –  Misha Moroshko Mar 11 '11 at 2:03
1  
This is probably done so that you can style the label of a field with errors as well. Also, rails knows what to wrap because you tell it which fields belong to what attribute of the resource your are making the form for: f.label :password and f.password_field :password in the @resource.errors there would be a [:password] error set. –  Mosselman Mar 21 '12 at 16:16
3  
If you're working with twitter bootstrap, or you want another example of what you can do in field_error_proc, checke out this awesome gist: gist.github.com/1464315 –  Ryan Sandridge Jun 26 '12 at 19:09
1  
Why would one do "#{html_tag}".html_safe , and not html_tag.html_safe ? –  Anurag Sep 16 '13 at 11:26
1  
Anurag: if html_tag happens to be nil, or anything other than a string, then a plain html_tag.html_safe would rais an error. Putting it in "#{html_tag}" implicitly calls html_tag.to_s, which hopefully will return a string, which will then be able to respond to html_safe –  sockmonk Nov 4 '13 at 21:52

The visual difference you are seeing is happening because the div element is a block element. Add this style to your CSS file to make it behave like an inline element:

.field_with_errors { display: inline; }
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Nice. I had to use display: inline-table; but it worked. –  n_i_c_k Mar 14 '12 at 5:54
2  
This is a hack at best because it negates whatever display: property being used (and other layout styles) on the html_tag. –  rxgx May 4 '12 at 21:34
1  
I don't see it as a hack. The display property being used before this css is added is block which is causing the visual difference that is not desired. It doesn't negate any other layout styles on the tag. However, Ryan Bigg's answer is perfect if you want to change/remove the tag that wraps the field with errors. –  dontangg May 7 '12 at 12:46
    
I tried this, however, if your fields are inside if <p> tags, it does not seem to work (at least not on Firefox) since a <div> within a <p> breaks lines no matter what. Using Biggs solution, only replacing <div with <span seems to do the trick. –  jpwynn Sep 18 '12 at 4:29

I currently use this solution, placed in an initializer:

ActionView::Base.field_error_proc = Proc.new do |html_tag, instance|
  class_attr_index = html_tag.index 'class="'

  if class_attr_index
    html_tag.insert class_attr_index+7, 'error '
  else
    html_tag.insert html_tag.index('>'), ' class="error"'
  end
end

This allows me to merely add a class name to the appropriate tag, without creating additional elements.

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2  
This is awesome for using the error fields in an unobtrusive way. –  rxgx May 4 '12 at 21:33
3  
This is totally awesome and the way it should be in the core (if at all). Thanks for sharing! –  Eric Jun 18 '12 at 22:21
    
This also worked for me when using Bourbon/Neat –  Eric Feb 18 at 0:14
    
Works on Rails 4.0.3. –  Yuki Matsukura Mar 7 at 6:39
    
Worked for me. Had to restart rails server to notice changes though :) –  Jezen Thomas Apr 29 at 18:35

The extra code is being added by ActionView::Base.field_error_proc. If you're not using field_with_errors to style your form, you can override it in application.rb:

config.action_view.field_error_proc = Proc.new { |html_tag, instance| html_tag.html_safe }

Alternatively, you can change it to something that suits your UI:

config.action_view.field_error_proc = Proc.new { |html_tag, instance| "<span class='field_with_errors'>#{html_tag}</span>".html_safe }
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This is working well for me; seems to be the most elegant solution for use with Twitter Bootstrap –  Avishai Mar 8 '13 at 22:18

If for some reason you are still working on Rails 2 (like I am) check out the SO post here.

It offers a script to put in initializers.

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One thing to keep in mind (as I discovered working through this today) is that if you float either the label or input fields (I'm floating all of the input fields right), the css will break even if you override ActionView::Base.field_error_proc.

An alternative is to drop a level deeper in the CSS formatting like so:

.field_with_errors label {
  padding: 2px;
  background-color: red;
}

.field_with_errors input[type="text"] {
  padding: 3px 2px;
  border: 2px solid red;
}
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This is my solution building on top of @Phobetron's answer. Placing this code in application.rb, your <p> and <span> tags generated by the corresponding form.error :p calls will receive the fields_with_errors css tag. The rest will receive the error CSS class.

config.action_view.field_error_proc = Proc.new { |html_tag, instance|
  class_attr_index = html_tag.index 'class="'

  if class_attr_index
    # target only p's and span's with class error already there
    error_class = if html_tag =~ /^<(p|span).*error/
      'field_with_errors '
    else
      'error '
    end

    html_tag.insert class_attr_index + 7, error_class
  else
    html_tag.insert html_tag.index('>'), ' class="error"'
  end
}

I found this way the most flexible and unobstrusive of all previous to style the response across my forms.

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If it's just for styling purposes (you don't mind the div), you can just add this to your css:

div.field_with_errors {
 display: inline;
}

The div will act like a span and it won't interfere with your design (since div is a block element – display: block;– by default, it will cause a new line after it closes; span is inline, so it does not).

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If its only about styling issues, we can overwrite "field_with_errors". But as that might effect other forms in our application, it's better to overwrite the "field_with_errors" class with in that form only.

Considering 'parent_class' is one of the parent class for form's error field (either form's class or class of any of the parent element for error field), then

  .parent_class .field_with_errors {
    display: inline;
  }

It will fix the issue as well as, it won't disturb any other forms in our applicaiton as well.

OR

If we need to override the style of "field_with_errors" for whole applicaiton, then as @dontangg said,

.field_with_errors { display: inline; } 

will do the fix. Hope it helps :)

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