Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a class. I have made two seperate files, the header, and the c++ file. I am using it to create a more-or-less Light 'object' for an opengl game I am working on. Here are the files: Light.h

#ifndef LIGHT_H
#define LIGHT_H


class Light
{
    public:
        Light(float ix, float iy, float iz, float ir, float ig, float ib , float ia, int itype, int iindex);
        virtual ~Light();
        float x,y,z;
        int index;
        int type;
        struct ambient
        {
            float r, g, b, a;
        };
        struct diffuse
        {
            float r, g, b, a;
        };
        struct specular
        {
           float r, g, b, a;
        };
    protected:
    private:
};

#endif // LIGHT_H

and, Light.cpp

#include "../include/Light.h"

Light::Light(float ix, float iy, float iz, float ir, float ig, float ib , float ia, int itype, int iindex)
{
    index=iindex;
    type=itype;
    x=ix;
    y=iy;
    z=iz;
    ambient.r = 0.2;
    ambient.g = 0.2;
    ambient.b = 0.2;
    ambient.a = 1.0;
    specular.r = 0.8;
    specular.g = 0.8;
    specular.b = 0.8;
    specular.a = 1.0;
    diffuse.r = ir;
    diffuse.g = ig;
    diffuse.b = ib;
    diffuse.a = ia;
}

Light::~Light()
{
    //dtor
}

When I try to compile, it throws an error saying: error: expected unqualified-id before ‘.’ token| For every line where I assign a value to a member of the structs (ambient, diffuse, specular) First off, I can't even interpret this error. No clue what it means. Secondly, I fail to see what I am doing wrong. Please help!

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

This should read so:

#ifndef LIGHT_H
#define LIGHT_H


class Light
{
    public:
        Light(float ix, float iy, float iz, float ir, float ig, float ib , float ia, int itype, int iindex);
        virtual ~Light();
        float x,y,z;
        int index;
        int type;
        struct
        {
            float r, g, b, a;
        } ambient;
        struct
        {
            float r, g, b, a;
        } diffuse;
        struct
        {
           float r, g, b, a;
        } specular;
    protected:
    private:
};

#endif // LIGHT_H

The basic problem is that you were declaring that the structs existed and giving the name of the type, but you weren't declaring any variables of that type. Since, from your usage, it was clear that the type of these structs didn't need a name (they could be anonymous structs) I moved the name after the declaration so you were declaring a variable instead.

As GMan pointed out, this is still not optimal. Here is a better way to go about this:

#ifndef LIGHT_H
#define LIGHT_H


class Light
{
    public:
        Light(float ix, float iy, float iz, float ir, float ig, float ib , float ia, int itype, int iindex);
        virtual ~Light();
        float x,y,z;
        int index;
        int type;

        struct Color {
            float r, g, b, a;
        };

        Color ambient, diffuse, specular;
    protected:
    private:
};

#endif // LIGHT_H
share|improve this answer
    
Ahh... I see. Thanks! – Keelx Mar 11 '11 at 3:08
3  
@Keelx: Better would be to have a Color class, and to make the members Color ambient; Color diffuse; Color specular;. You're repeating yourself on all the types: never repeat yourself. – GManNickG Mar 11 '11 at 3:17
    
@GMan: I'm tired and distracted. I should've noticed that. – Omnifarious Mar 11 '11 at 3:21
    
Yeah, I was surprised you didn't. :) Happens to everyone. – GManNickG Mar 11 '11 at 3:35
    
cool. Thanks for the help! – Keelx Mar 11 '11 at 3:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.