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If I call document.write() inside a script tag, can I trust that it will always execute at the same time on major browsers (that is, during page load and before onload event)?

Also, will this work on major browsers:

  <script ...>
     if (condition)
        document.write('<div ...>');
     else
        document.write('<span ...>');
  </script>
      ... // some content.

  <script ...>
     if (condition)
        document.write('</div>');
     else
        document.write('</span>');
  </script>

?

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If the script tags are not deferred (<script defer>), then they run in the order they appear and if they are inside the <head> or <body> then they will run before onload.

Using document.write after the body has been loaded (after the document has closed actually) is dangerous since it will blow away the document. So

setTimeout(function () { document.write('O Hai'); }, 1000)

is a good way to blow away your document.

The reason they have to write out in the order they appear is that the browser cannot be sure that the second script tag really is a script tag until the first script tag finishes executing. Consider what the browser has to do to handle

<script>
if (Math.random() < 0.5) {
  document.write("<script>");
}
</script>
alert('One'); /*
<script>
alert('Two');
//*/</script>
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You'd be better off putting these in functions and triggering them with the body onload event. Or, if you don't mind a jquery dependency, $(document).ready()

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The definition of document.write is that it will write the content in the exact location of the document.write. This behavior is consistent across browsers.

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