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In my Function.h file:

class Function{
  public:
    Function();
    int help();
};

In my Function.cpp file:

#include "Function.h"
int Function::help() //Error here
{
  using namespace std;
  cout << "Help";
  return 1;
}

In my Main.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include "Function.h"
using namespace std;

int menu(){
  Function fc;
  fc.help();
  return 1;
}

int main(int args, char**argv){
  return menu();
}


Error is : ‘Function’ has not been declared
Can anybody tell me why? Thank you.

I tried like this and the problem is solved, but I dont really understand why:
In Function.h file:
I use

class Function{
  public:
    int status;
    Function():status(1){}
    int help();
};

instead of the old one

class Function{
  public:
    Function();
    int help();
};
share|improve this question
    
Does function.h includes some other header file? –  Naveen Mar 11 '11 at 5:36
    
no it doesn't.. –  Xitrum Mar 11 '11 at 5:46
2  
You have edited your question so that the problem vanished. This makes it not more readable. Suggesting to keep the coding errors and write an own answer. –  harper Mar 11 '11 at 6:19

4 Answers 4

All your include statements are missing the #:

#include "Function.h"
^

Everything else looks fine, though you need to also #include <iostream> in Function.cpp since you're using cout.

Here is the Function.cpp that I got to compile and run:

#include "Function.h"
#include <iostream>

int Function::help() // No error here
{
    using namespace std;
    cout << "Help";
    return 1;
}

Function::Function()
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
ah thanks, but # is missed because I couldnot type it here, I had it in my file –  Xitrum Mar 11 '11 at 5:29
    
@user: Hmm, I'm at a loss then. Are you sure the code you posted reproduces the error? Is there any other code in Function.cpp? –  Cameron Mar 11 '11 at 5:33
    
no, that's all of my code –  Xitrum Mar 11 '11 at 5:43
    
@user: OK, I copied your code into a test project. I needed to add the #include <iostream> and the constructor definition to make it compile (and link), but otherwise it works fine –  Cameron Mar 11 '11 at 5:48
    
ya, I tried and this time it still didnot run :( –  Xitrum Mar 11 '11 at 5:57

You have created a declaration for the constructor of the Function class without including it in your implementation (cpp file).

#include "Function.h"

Function::Function(){
    // construction stuff here
}

int Function::help() //Error here
{
using namespace std;
cout << "Help";
return 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good point, but that shouldn't be causing the error (that's a link-time error) –  Cameron Mar 11 '11 at 5:31
    
@Cameron: You are right on that. –  GWW Mar 11 '11 at 5:31
    
ya, I tried but not successful –  Xitrum Mar 11 '11 at 5:33
    
Do you get the same error or something else? –  GWW Mar 11 '11 at 5:33
    
When I tried as u told, I had the following errors<br/> ‘Function’ has not been declared/ ISO C++ forbids declaration of ‘Function’ with no type/ ‘Function’ is not a class or namespace/ –  Xitrum Mar 11 '11 at 5:44

I had a similar problem. Make sure that you only have the required header files. I had two header files both including each other and it spit out this mistake.

share|improve this answer

In the first Function.h file you have declared the constructor but not defined it. In the second Function.h file (the one that works) you have defined and declared the Function constructor. You can either define and declare in the header or file, or declare in the header file and define in the Function.cpp file.

For example, declare in the header file "Function.h":

    class Function
    {
    Function();
    }

and define here in "Function.cpp":

    Function::Function(){}

Or the alternative is to declare and define in the header file "Function.h":

    Class Function
    {
    Function(){}
    }

The other thing that you have done in the second version of the header file is to initialise the member variable "status" in the "member initialisation list" which is a good thing to do (See Effective C++ by Scott Meyers, Item 4). Hope this helps :)

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