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Whats a cool way to protect attributes by role using declarative_authorization? For example, a user can edit his contact information but not his role.

My first inclination was to create multiple controller actions for different scenarios. I quickly realized how unwieldy this could become as the number of protected attributes grows. Doing this for user role is one thing, but I can imagine multiple protected attributes. Adding a lot controller actions and routes doesn't feel right.

My second inclination was to create permissions around specific sensitive attributes and then wrap the form elements with View hepers provided by declarative_authorizations. However, the model and controller aspect of this is a bit foggy in my mind. Suggestions would be awesome.

Please advise on the best way to protect attributes by role using declaritive_authorizations ... thanks

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scoped_attr_accessible github.com/thefrontiergroup/scoped_attr_accessible –  jrhicks Mar 11 '11 at 21:25
    
attr_accessible_block github.com/dmitry/attr_accessible_block –  jrhicks Mar 11 '11 at 21:26
    
Could you specify, what exactly you are trying to achieve (or give an example). What exactly should happen when the protected attribute is accessed? I can imagine at least two scenarions: 1. protection used for development should probably raise and exception 2. protection used for produstion should probably return nil, but than you will have hard time to check for nil everytime you ask for any value of attribute which is protected for any user. –  gorn Mar 14 '11 at 23:43
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+250

EDIT 2011-05-22
Something similar is now in Rails as of 3.1RC https://github.com/rails/rails/blob/master/activerecord/test/cases/mass_assignment_security_test.rb so I would suggest going that route now.

ORIGINAL ANSWER
I just had to port what I had been using previously to Rails 3. I've never used declarative authorization specifically, but this is pretty simple and straightforward enough that you should be able to adapt to it.

Rails 3 added mass_assignment_authorizer, which makes this all really simple. I used that linked tutorial as a basis and just made it fit my domain model better, with class inheritance and grouping the attributes into roles.

In model

acts_as_accessible :admin => :all, :moderator => [:is_spam, :is_featured]
attr_accessible :title, :body # :admin, :moderator, and anyone else can set these

In controller

post.accessed_by(current_user.roles.collect(&:code)) # or however yours works
post.attributes = params[:post]

lib/active_record/acts_as_accessible.rb

# A way to have different attr_accessible attributes based on a Role
# @see ActsAsAccessible::ActMethods#acts_as_accessible
module ActiveRecord
  module ActsAsAccessible
    module ActMethods
      # In model
      # acts_as_accessible :admin => :all, :moderator => [:is_spam]
      # attr_accessible :title, :body
      #
      # In controller
      # post.accessed_by(current_user.roles.collect(&:code))
      # post.attributes = params[:post]
      #
      # Warning: This frequently wouldn't be the concern of the model where this is declared in,
      # but it is so much more useful to have it in there with the attr_accessible declaration.
      # OHWELL.
      #
      # @param [Hash] roles Hash of { :role => [:attr, :attr] }
      # @see acts_as_accessible_attributes
      def acts_as_accessible(*roles)
        roles_attributes_hash = Hash.new {|h,k| h[k] ||= [] }
        roles_attributes_hash = roles_attributes_hash.merge(roles.extract_options!).symbolize_keys

        if !self.respond_to? :acts_as_accessible_attributes
          attr_accessible
          write_inheritable_attribute :acts_as_accessible_attributes, roles_attributes_hash.symbolize_keys
          class_inheritable_reader    :acts_as_accessible_attributes

          # extend ClassMethods unless (class << self; included_modules; end).include?(ClassMethods)
          include InstanceMethods unless included_modules.include?(InstanceMethods)
        else # subclass
          new_acts_as_accessible_attributes = self.acts_as_accessible_attributes.dup
          roles_attributes_hash.each do |role,attrs|
            new_acts_as_accessible_attributes[role] += attrs
          end
          write_inheritable_attribute :acts_as_accessible_attributes, new_acts_as_accessible_attributes.symbolize_keys
        end
      end
    end

    module InstanceMethods
      # @param [Array, NilClass] roles Array of Roles or nil to reset
      # @return [Array, NilClass]
      def accessed_by(*roles)
        if roles.any?
          case roles.first
          when NilClass
            @accessed_by = nil
          when Array
            @accessed_by = roles.first.flatten.collect(&:to_sym)
          else
            @accessed_by = roles.flatten.flatten.collect(&:to_sym)
          end
        end
        @accessed_by
      end

      private
      # This is what really does the work in attr_accessible/attr_protected.
      # This override adds the acts_as_accessible_attributes for the current accessed_by roles.
      # @see http://asciicasts.com/episodes/237-dynamic-attr-accessible
      def mass_assignment_authorizer
        attrs = []
        if self.accessed_by
          self.accessed_by.each do |role|
            if self.acts_as_accessible_attributes.include? role
              if self.acts_as_accessible_attributes[role] == :all
                return self.class.protected_attributes
              else
                attrs += self.acts_as_accessible_attributes[role]
              end
            end
          end
        end
        super + attrs
      end
    end
  end
end

ActiveRecord::Base.send(:extend, ActiveRecord::ActsAsAccessible::ActMethods)

spec/lib/active_record/acts_as_accessible.rb

require 'spec_helper'

class TestActsAsAccessible
  include ActiveModel::MassAssignmentSecurity
  extend ActiveRecord::ActsAsAccessible::ActMethods
  attr_accessor :foo, :bar, :baz, :qux
  acts_as_accessible :dude => [:bar], :bra => [:baz, :qux], :admin => :all
  attr_accessible :foo
  def attributes=(values)
    sanitize_for_mass_assignment(values).each do |k, v|
      send("#{k}=", v)
    end
  end
end

describe TestActsAsAccessible do
  it "should still allow mass assignment to accessible attributes by default" do
    subject.attributes = {:foo => 'fooo'}
    subject.foo.should == 'fooo'
  end
  it "should not allow mass assignment to non-accessible attributes by default" do
    subject.attributes = {:bar => 'baaar'}
    subject.bar.should be_nil
  end
  it "should allow mass assignment to acts_as_accessible attributes when passed appropriate accessed_by" do
    subject.accessed_by :dude
    subject.attributes = {:bar => 'baaar'}
    subject.bar.should == 'baaar'
  end
  it "should allow mass assignment to multiple acts_as_accessible attributes when passed appropriate accessed_by" do
    subject.accessed_by :bra
    subject.attributes = {:baz => 'baaaz', :qux => 'quuux'}
    subject.baz.should == 'baaaz'
    subject.qux.should == 'quuux'
  end
  it "should allow multiple accessed_by to be specified" do
    subject.accessed_by :dude, :bra
    subject.attributes = {:bar => 'baaar', :baz => 'baaaz', :qux => 'quuux'}
    subject.bar.should == 'baaar'
    subject.baz.should == 'baaaz'
    subject.qux.should == 'quuux'
  end
  it "should allow :all access" do
    subject.accessed_by :admin
    subject.attributes = {:bar => 'baaar', :baz => 'baaaz', :qux => 'quuux'}
    subject.bar.should == 'baaar'
    subject.baz.should == 'baaaz'
    subject.qux.should == 'quuux'
  end
end
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thanks for the insight –  jrhicks Mar 21 '11 at 1:51
    
Something similar is now in Rails as of 3.1RC github.com/rails/rails/blob/master/activerecord/test/cases/… so I would suggest going that route now. –  scragz May 22 '11 at 7:27
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To me this filtering problem is something that should be applied at the controller level.

You'll want to have something somewhere that defines how to decide which attributes are writeable for a given user.

# On the user model
class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  # ...

  # Return a list of symbols representing the accessible attributes
  def self.allowed_params(user)
    if user.admin?
      [:name, :email, :role]
    else
      [:name, email]
    end
  end
end

Then, in the application controller you can define a method to filter parameters.

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  # ...
  protected

  def restrict_params(param, model, user)
    params[param].reject! do |k,v|
      !model.allowed_params(user).include?(k)
    end
  end
  # ...
end

And finally in your controller action you can use this filter:

class UserController < ActionController::Base
  # ...
  def update
    restrict_params(:user, User, @current_user)
    # and continue as normal
  end
  # ...
end

The idea is that you could then define allowed_params on each of your models, and have the controllers for each of these use the same filter method. You could save some boilerplate by having a method in application controller that spits out a before filter, like this:

def self.param_restrictions(param, model)
  before_filter do
    restrict_params(param, model, @current_user) if params[param]
  end
end

# in UserController
param_restrictions :user, User

These examples are intended to be illustrative rather than definitive, I hope they help with the implementation of this.

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I'd use scoped_attr_accessible, which looks like just what you're looking for. Only you need to set the scope at the start of a request for all models.

To do that, use a before_filter in your application_controller.rb:

before_filter do |controller|
  ScopedAttrAccessible.current_sanitizer_scope = controller.current_user.role
end
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I would avoid every solution based on user access in model because it seems potentially dangerous. I would try this approach:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base

  def update_attributes_as_user(values, user)
    values.each do |attribute, value|
      # Update the attribute if the user is allowed to
      @user.send("#{attribute}=", value) if user.modifiable_attributes.include?(attribute)
    end
    save
  end

  def modifiable_attributes
    admin? ? [:name, :email, :role] : [:name, :email]
  end
end

Then in your controller change your update action from:

@user.update_attributes(params[:user])

to

@user.update_attributes_as_user(params[:user], current_user)
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Rails 3.1+ comes with a +assign_attributes+ method for this purpose - http://apidock.com/rails/ActiveRecord/AttributeAssignment/assign_attributes.

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