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I need to be able to represent the same concept with a few different units in F#. For example, I want to represent "distance" using light-years, astronomical units, kilometers and meters. I'd like to use a generic function for doing calculations with these values. This is how I've grouped ly, AU, km, and m together:

[<Measure>] type ly
[<Measure>] type AU
[<Measure>] type km
[<Measure>] type m

[<Measure>] type distance

type UnitValue<[<Measure>] 'u, [<Measure>] 't> =
    val conversionFactor : float<'t / 'u>
    val value : float<'u>
    new (v, cf) = { value = FloatWithMeasure<'u> v; conversionFactor = FloatWithMeasure<'t / 'u> cf }
    member this.toUnits = this.value * this.conversionFactor
    member this.fromUnits (x : float<'t>) = x / this.conversionFactor
    static member (+) (a : UnitValue<'u, 't>, b : UnitValue<_, 't>) =
        a.newValue (a.toUnits + b.toUnits)
    static member (-) (a : UnitValue<'u, 't>, b : UnitValue<_, 't>) =
        a.newValue (a.toUnits - b.toUnits)
    static member (*) (a : UnitValue<'u, 't>, b : float) =
        a.newValue (a.toUnits * b)
    member this.newValue (x : float<'t>) =
        new UnitValue<'u, 't>(float (this.fromUnits x), float this.conversionFactor)

//Distance units
type LightYearValue(value) =
    inherit UnitValue<ly, distance>(value, 6324.0)

type AstronomicalUnitValue(value) =
    inherit UnitValue<AU, distance>(value, 15.0)

type KilometerValue(value) =
    inherit UnitValue<km, distance>(value, 0.00001)

type MeterValue(value) =
    inherit UnitValue<m, distance>(value, 0.0000000)

This code is called from unit-unaware C#, and can be done by just specifying new LightYearValue(4.2), which will become a UnitValue<ly, distance> in F#, and can be passed to a function expecting a UnitValue<_, distance>. That way, the appropriate units go into the function, and the appropriate units go out. For example, if I passed the function a UnitValue<AU, distance>, I might get back a float<AU / s ^ 2> depending on the calculation--and it would be an appropriate number for the scale.

Feeling pretty happy with this, I start writing an Orbit type:

and Orbit(PeR : UnitValue<_, distance>, ApR : UnitValue<_, distance>, AgP : float, focus : SphericalMass) =
    let PeR = PeR
    let ApR = ApR
    let AgP = AgP
    let focus = focus
    let Maj = PeR + ApR
    let Ecc = (Maj.value - (2.0 * PeR.value)) / Maj.value
    let DistanceAt theta =
        (Maj.value / 2.0) * (1.0 - Ecc ** 2.0) / (1.0 + Ecc * Math.Cos(theta))

but when I hover my mouse over PeR, it says its type is UnitValue<1, distance>. So what gives? Why doesn't this work? I can write a function taking UnitValue<_, distance> and it works fine! Could it have to do with C# interacting with this code? (the type is extended by a C# class) Is there any way to make this work :(

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When declaring type, you need to declare generic type parameters (and also unit parameters) explicitly. The following declaration infers the types correctly:

type Orbit<[<Measure>] 'u, [<Measure>] 'v> 
    ( PeR : UnitValue<'u, distance>, ApR : UnitValue<'v, distance>,
      AgP : float, focus : SphericalMass) =
  let Maj = PeR + ApR
  let Ecc = (Maj.value - (2.0 * PeR.value)) / Maj.value
  let DistanceAt theta =
      (Maj.value / 2.0) * (1.0 - Ecc ** 2.0) / (1.0 + Ecc * Math.Cos(theta))

(BTW: You don't need to re-assign parameters to local let bindings - they will be accessible automatically, so I removed lines like let ApR = ApR)

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of course! I was kind of afraid of that though :/ I didn't want to declare the units everywhere –  Carson Myers Mar 11 '11 at 14:55

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