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Is it possible to change a versioned entity instance, and get the to-be-incremented-version without using flush ? Because from what i read, im afraid flush is not a good practice because it's bad impact for the performance or even data corruption ? Im not sure :D


Here's a simple code and also the output as the comment :

/*
    Hibernate: select receivingg0_.id as id9_14_, receivingg0_.creationDate as creation2_9_14_, ... too long
    the version before modification : 16
    the version after modification : 16
    after merge the modification, the version is : 16
    Hibernate: update ReceivingGood set creationDate=?, modificationDate=?, usercreate_id=?, usermodify_id=?,  ... too long
    after flushing the modification, the version is finally : 17
*/
public void modifyHeaderAndGetUpdatedVersion() {
    String id = "3b373f6a-9cd1-4c9c-9d46-240de37f6b0f";
    ReceivingGood receivingGood = em.find(ReceivingGood.class, id);
    System.out.println("the version before modification : " + receivingGood.getVersion());

    receivingGood.setTransactionNumber("NUM001xyz");
    System.out.println("the version after modification : " + receivingGood.getVersion());

    receivingGood = em.merge(receivingGood);
    System.out.println("after merge the modification, the version is : " + receivingGood.getVersion());

    em.flush();
    System.out.println("after flushing the modification, the version is finally : " + receivingGood.getVersion());
}

In my test, the version got incremented after the flush. The instance returned from the merge operation doesnt have the incremented version.

But in my case, i would like to return the entity to my webui in the form of DTO, and the entity should have the version-after-flush/commit before converting it to DTO and returning it to the UI to be rendered. And then the UI could have the latest version, and will pass this version for the next submission.


Is there any way where i can get the latest version without doing flush ?

Thank you !


UPDATE


In my experience, incrementing this manually can be problematic as can be seen from this example below. In this example, we have 2 flushes.

The 1st one is to synchronize the changes to the db connection, so that a stored procedure call from the same connection could see the changes made from the entityManager.

The second flush is called to get the final version. And we can see this is incremented twice. So getting version just from the manual increment without flushing wouldnt work in this condition, as we have to really count how many flushes are being made.

/*
Hibernate: select receivingg0_.id as id9_14_, receivingg0_.creationDate as creation2_9_14_, .. too long
the version before modification : 18
the version after modification : 18
after merge the modification, the version is : 18
now flushing the modification, so that the stored procedure call from the same connection can see the changes
Hibernate: update ReceivingGood set creationDate=?, modificationDate=?, usercreate_id=?, .. too long
after flushing the modification, the version is : 19
Hibernate: update ReceivingGood set creationDate=?, modificationDate=?, usercreate_id=?, .. too long
after the second flush, the version got increased again into : 20
*/
public void modifyHeaderAndGetUpdatedVersionWith2Flushes() {
    String id = "3b373f6a-9cd1-4c9c-9d46-240de37f6b0f";
    ReceivingGood receivingGood = em.find(ReceivingGood.class, id);
    System.out.println("the version before modification : " + receivingGood.getVersion());

    //auditEntity(receivingGood, getUser("3978fee3-9690-4377-84bd-9fb05928a6fc"));
    receivingGood.setTransactionNumber("NUM001xyz");
    System.out.println("the version after modification : " + receivingGood.getVersion());

    receivingGood = em.merge(receivingGood);
    System.out.println("after merge the modification, the version is : " + receivingGood.getVersion());
    System.out.println("now flushing the modification, so that the stored procedure call from the same connection can see the changes");
    em.flush();
    System.out.println("after flushing the modification, the version is : " + receivingGood.getVersion());

    receivingGood.setTransactionNumber("NUM001abc");

    em.flush();
    System.out.println("after the second flush, the version got increased again into : " + receivingGood.getVersion());
}

Does this mean i really have to depend on the flush at the end to get the latest version for the modified entity ?


UPDATE 2


Here's a simple example of a service method that will update the ReceivingGood entity and should return a DTO that has the newest version.

public ReceivingGoodDTO update(ReceivingGood entity) {
  // merge it
  entity = entityManager.merge(entity);

  // the version is not incremented yet, so do the flush to increment the version
  entityManager.flush(); // if i dont do this, the dto below will get the unincremented one

  // use a mapper, maybe like dozer, to copy the properties from the entity to the dto object, including the newest version of that entity
  ReceivingGoodDTO dto = mapper.map(entity, dto);

  return dto;
}

and here is an example that makes use of that method :

@Transactional
public ReceivingGoodDTO doSomethingInTheServiceAndReturnDTO() {
  // do xxx ..
  // do yyy ..
  dto = update(entity);
  return dto; // and the transaction commits here, but dto's version isnt increased because it's not a managed entity, just a plain POJO
}
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'll again recommend reading more about Hibernate and how it works, be it by its documentation or "Java Persistence with Hibernate".

You are seeing this in flush operation because that's where the database updates happens. If you just omit the flush and commit the transaction, you'll see the same behavior. Meaning, whenever your unit-of-work finishes, Hibernate will flush the changes to the database. It's in this step that Hibernate compares and updates the version number. If the database version is 17 and you are updating the version 16, Hibernate will thrown an exception, about updating a stale object.

That said, you can "predict" what would be the next version by incrementing 1 on the value that you currently have in your instance. But this will never be real, because this is only effectively incremented right before updating the database record. So, any concurrent changes will not be visible to your thread, unless you query the database.

Edit:

You are seeing two increments because you are doing two flushes. The "version" is a technique for "optimistic" locking, meaning, you expects that only one thread will update a record during any unit-of-work (in a broader sense, think as a "user action", where he lists the records, pick one and updates it). It's purpose is mainly to avoid Hibernate from updating a stale object, where two users pick the same record for editing, do some concurrent changes and updates it. One of the edits will have to be rejected, and the first one hitting the database wins. As you are updating the record twice (by calling flush twice), you are seeing two increments. But it's really not about flushes, it's about "updates issued in the database". If you had two transactions, you'd see the same behavior.

That said, it's worth noting that this technique should be managed by Hibernate. You should not increment it by yourself. It's often a good practice to not provide setters for this kind of fields.

In other words: you should regard the "version" as a read-only value and that you have no control over it. So, it's safe to display its value on-screen for the user, but it's not safe to manipulate it (or "determine" the next version). At most, you can make a "best-guess", predicting that it'll be current_version+1.

share|improve this answer
    
@partenon: I understand about how flushing and commit works, and how the version got incremented by them. But still i will read the book you recommended :-) Anyway, i've updated my original post for some additional concerns regarding the manual increment. Thank you as always. – bertie Mar 11 '11 at 9:29
    
I just updated the answer to address your new concerns :-) – jpkrohling Mar 11 '11 at 9:40
1  
@partenon: So, i can finally conclude that, to create a DTO inside the active transaction that reflects the entity with the latest version, i really do have to do a flush(). Thank you ! – bertie Mar 11 '11 at 9:46
1  
No :-) Once the transaction is finished or a flush happens, the object is updated by Hibernate. So, if you just commit your transaction, your DTO will be updated. – jpkrohling Mar 11 '11 at 9:48
    
@partenon: Ah, im sorry i didnt get you. So, i've updated a simple example of a service or dao method, that updates the entity, and return a DTO with the updated version. I dont really understand how the DTO gets updated in commit phase ? – bertie Mar 11 '11 at 10:23

The latest version is the current one + 1. You could increment the version yourself in the entityToDto() method.

But in your example, doing the flush won't cause such a performance problem, IMO, since Hibernate will do it anyway at commit time. There will be two flushes, but the second one won't have anything to flush anymore.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello2, i've updated my original post for some additional concerns regarding the manual increment. – bertie Mar 11 '11 at 9:30

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