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Is it possible, in any browser, using any plugin, to enable or disable breakpoints in your code programmatically?

I already know about setting conditional breakpoints, but I'm really interested in setting them via code.

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3 Answers 3

You can use debugger; in code to make breakpoint for firebug. For example:

alert('1');
debugger;
alert('2');

And firebug automatically stops on this keyword.

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1  
Works also in firebug console! –  CoolEsh Mar 11 '11 at 10:13
    
Yep, that is handy, but it's not really as programmatic as I need: eg, dynamically adding a breakpoint at the start of any arbitrary function. –  nickf Mar 11 '11 at 10:24
    
Add it throught firebug. Its really dinamically. lol –  CoolEsh Mar 11 '11 at 10:31
1  
Also works in WebKit –  Muers Nov 14 '12 at 18:53

Have a look at the FireBug functions debug(fn) & undebug(fn) names which set a breakpoint on the first line of the named function.

See point #6:

http://michaelsync.net/2007/09/30/firebug-tutorial-script-tab-javascript-debugging

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Can this be executed from the Javascript itself, or is it only from the firebug command line? Adding debug(myFunctionName); to my code throws an error for me. –  nickf Mar 11 '11 at 12:25

First you could add a call to a function like __checkDebug(); which will check for a global (or semi-global) variable and when said variable is true, call debugger.

  
function __checkDebug() {
   if (debugme) debugger;
}

all of your functions you're concerned about debugging would be like so:

  
function foo() {
   __checkDebug();

   //.... whatever foo was gonna do.
}

You can then take it a little further and dynamically decorate functions while the code is being executed like so:


Function.prototype.debug = function(){   
   var fn = this; 
   return function(){     
       if (debugme) debugger; 
       return fn.apply(this, arguments);     
   }; 
}; 

foo = foo.debug();  

now any time foo is called it will call debugger if the debugme variable is truthy.

Another option would be to build a javascript build system that injects the call after every function declaration - this requires a syntax parser but if you're only looking to modify functions a simple tokenizer for that use case is pretty easy to write - but I'll leave that up to you.

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