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In the following code:

class Abc {
    int x;
    void clear() { x=0; }
}


map<string, Abc> mymap;
Abc abc1;
abc1.x = 12;
mymap[1] = abc1;

map<string, Abc>::iterator it = mymap.begin();
it->second.clear();

map<string, Abc>::iterator it2 = mymap.begin();
cout << it2->second.x; // what will this display?

Supposing I have no errors (map is not empty, etc.), will the call to clear modify the element stored in the map, or a copy?

I know that if I stored Abc* pointers in the map, there would be no problem, it would print 0, but I can't figure if second returns a value or a reference, and if I'm clearing the value that's in the map or a copy of it.

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4 Answers 4

second is a reference - you're modifying the element stored in the map. Or, to be specific, *it is a reference to the std::pair stored in the map, second is the actual element.

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1  
I guess this is the purpose of iterators to allow this, right ? (and the reason why at some point a function might return an iterator where a non-C++ programmer would have expected to receive "the result"). Is there any case where we have read-only iterators and is there a way to tell it is so by looking at the std::* documentation (e.g. const_iterator) ? –  sylvainulg Mar 11 '11 at 10:41
    
@sylvainulg: On the second question, no. You return an iterator when you'd want to access adjoining elements; you'd return a reference to the result if you want to be able to modify the result. –  MSalters Mar 11 '11 at 10:43
    
@sylvainulg: If an iterator is categorized as an "input iterator" in docs, you cannot assign to its contents. E.g. istream_iterator which is used to extract values from a stream. This is in addition to const_iterator versions, of course. –  Erik Mar 11 '11 at 10:49
map<string, Abc> mymap;
Abc abc1;
abc1.x = 12;
mymap[1] = abc1;

Compilation error :

Because the key type is string, but you passing 1 to mymap as key.

cout << it2->second.x; // what will this display?

It will display the value of x : 0

This is equivalent to this:

Abc a;
a.x = 12;
a.clear();
cout << a.x ; //prints 0, because a.clear() made it 0!
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Also, the clear method is private. –  Björn Pollex Mar 11 '11 at 10:38
    
Yeah........... –  Nawaz Mar 11 '11 at 10:41

It will modify the element in the map, .second is not a function it's a member of a std::pair structure

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Why don't you just try? You can write a copy constructor for Abc that prints out a message when the object is copied:

class Abc {
public:
    Abc(const Abc & other) 
     : x(other.x)
    {
        std::cout << "copying" << std::endl;
    }
    void clear() { x=0; }
private:
    int x;
}

Using this, you can find out if your object is getting copied. You should do things like that to learn how things work.

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