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I have 45 dropdown lists in my asp page. There are some methods that I can apply to all of these dropdowns. Is it possible to convert them into an array of dropdowns for ease of use?

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What sort of method? To bind the data to them and then render them on the page? –  Tim B James Mar 11 '11 at 11:13
    
yes one of them is to bind data to them, one of them is to retrieve selected data from them to insert into a database etc. –  blenderous Mar 11 '11 at 11:15
    
If you have 45 dropdowns on one page? Woah... is this in some kind of grid? –  Lazarus Mar 11 '11 at 11:48
    
no its not on a grid, its on the page itself –  blenderous Mar 11 '11 at 12:34
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would use recursion to look for all dropdowns on your page. Based on this post it would be something like:

    public static List<T> FindControls<T>(System.Web.UI.ControlCollection Controls) where T : class
{
List<T> found = new List<T>();
FindControls<T>(Controls, found);
return found;
}
    private static void FindControls<T>(System.Web.UI.ControlCollection Controls, List<T> found) where T : class
    {
         if (Controls != null && Controls.Count > 0)
         {
              for (int i = 0; i < Controls.Count; i++)
              {
                   if (Controls[i] is T)
                   {
                        found.add(Controls[i] as T);
                   }
                   else
                        FindControl<T>(Controls[i].Controls, found);
              }
         }

       }

Once you have your list of dropdowns you can apply whatever methods you see fit.

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thanks, I'l try it out –  blenderous Mar 11 '11 at 11:20
1  
What happens if we have a controls collection with a control of T, followed by a grouping control which contains a control of T? We declare List<T> found, add our control of T, call back into our self, create a new local List<T>, add the subcontrol of T, return local List<T> and assign it to our initial List<T>... won't we lose the first control of T? I'm notoriously bad at running code in my head so I may be missing something obvious here and am completely open to being corrected. –  Lazarus Mar 11 '11 at 11:47
    
@Lazarus - You are quite right Lazarus. I have amended the code accordingly. –  Mark Robinson Mar 11 '11 at 12:44
    
Nice. –  Lazarus Mar 11 '11 at 13:13
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Using Linq to Objects, an Extension method and Generics we can make this very concise thus:

Method Call to Get all DropDowns

var DropDowns = FindAllControlsByType<DropDownList>(MyBaseControlArray);

Find Controls Method

public static IEnumerable<Control> FindAllControlsByType<T>(IEnumerable<Control> MyCollection) where T : class
{
    return MyCollection.Cast<Control>().Descendants(d => d.Controls.Cast<Control>()).Where(l => l.GetType().Equals(typeof(T)));
}

Descendants Extension Method

static public class LinqExtensions
{
    static public IEnumerable<T> Descendants<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, 
                                                Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> DescendBy)
    {
        foreach (T value in source)
        {
            yield return value;

            foreach (T child in DescendBy(value).Descendants<T>(DescendBy))
            {
                yield return child;
            }
        }
    }
}

EDIT

I've been looking at making this all a mite more generic so here is a completely generic solution that will traverse an object graph from a specified start point extracting all elements of the given type.

public static class Utils
{
    public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> GetCollections<T>(object obj)
    {
        if (obj == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("obj");
        var type = obj.GetType();
        var res = new List<IEnumerable<T>>();
        foreach (var prop in type.GetProperties())
        {
            // is IEnumerable<T>?
            if (typeof(IEnumerable<T>).IsAssignableFrom(prop.PropertyType))
            {
                var get = prop.GetGetMethod();
                if (!get.IsStatic && get.GetParameters().Length == 0) // skip indexed & static
                {
                    var collection = (IEnumerable<T>)get.Invoke(obj, null);
                    if (collection != null) res.Add(collection);
                }
            }
        }
        return res;
    }

    public static IEnumerable<V> FindAllControlsByType<V, T>(V MyCollection) where T : class
    {
        return Utils.GetCollections<V>(MyCollection).Descendants(d => d).Where(l => typeof(T).IsAssignableFrom(l.GetType()));
    }
}

static public class LinqExtensions
{
    static public IEnumerable<T> Descendants<T>(this IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> source,
                                                Func<IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>>, IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>>> DescendBy)
    {
        foreach (IEnumerable<T> collection in source)
        {
            foreach (T value in collection)
            {
                yield return value;

                foreach (T child in DescendBy(Utils.GetCollections<T>(value)).Descendants<T>(DescendBy))
                {
                    yield return child;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

And we can call that using:

var DropDowns = Utils.FindAllControlsByType<Control, DropDownList>(BaseControl);

Basically the two types are the base class and the specific child class that you want to extract. You'll notice that the process identifies all collections of the base class that are contained within each instance of the base class. This means we're not tied to Controls as the collection and could use this within other structures. Any additional optimisations welcomed.

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I'm sorry I do not understand linq, I guess this will be useful to many others... –  blenderous Mar 12 '11 at 7:42
    
You're probably right (on both statements), and it's okay as I didn't really write it for you but rather for myself. It was a learning exercise. –  Lazarus Mar 12 '11 at 9:26
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