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RE: .htaccess - how to force "www." in a generic way?

I asked this question before, and got this answer:

RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^$
RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^www\. [NC]
RewriteCond %{HTTPS}s ^on(s)|
RewriteRule ^ http%1://www.%{HTTP_HOST}%{REQUEST_URI} [R=301,L]

It works, but now I am seeing 301 Moved Permanently in the response headers. I want to eliminate the 301s. Is the problem the 2nd rewrite condition? Should it be something like "does not start with 'www.' followed by the host name"?

By the way, I want this solution to work for any server (meaning, I don't want to hard code my domain name).

Suggestions?

UPDATE:

I just realized that the above is not working correctly. If I have the following:

http://images.domain.com

I don't want that to change to:

http://www.images.domain.com

I don't want this affecting sub-domains. I only want it to affect missing www.

share|improve this question
    
Re making the solution work on any server, it should do that already, shouldn't it? –  Pekka 웃 Mar 11 '11 at 11:20
    
@Pekka, this one does. I just wanted to tell the experts here so that they don't provide me with an answer that involves hard coding my domain name. –  StackOverflowNewbie Mar 11 '11 at 11:30
    
@Stack well, I think what you want to do can't be done. Why is the 301 a problem? –  Pekka 웃 Mar 11 '11 at 11:41
    
How do you plan to perform the redirect without telling the browser about it? –  Dave Child Mar 11 '11 at 12:08
    
@Pekka - two of my 301 redirects cost about 260ms (images). The other one cost about 520ms (CSS). I'm trying to see what I can do to optimize the speed of the site. –  StackOverflowNewbie Mar 11 '11 at 12:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Redirecting to a different domain is by definition not possible without some header redirect. If you want the URL in the user's browser to change, you have to force a new request. There is no way around that.

You will have to take your pick - the 301, 302 and 303 status codes being the most straight forward choices.

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I've updated my question with an additional problem. Are you able to help? I'm a bit lost now. –  StackOverflowNewbie Mar 11 '11 at 13:00
    
@StackOverflow an additional RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^example.com$ would fix it but that would bind it to specific domains. As to how to exclude images.*, maybe ask Gumbo in the other question, he knows more about this stuff –  Pekka 웃 Mar 11 '11 at 13:02
    
do you know how I can make the rule say "does not begin with a www followed by a dot followed by the HTTP HOST"? That's the only time I think I want to rewrite. –  StackOverflowNewbie Mar 11 '11 at 19:54
    
@Stack mmm, if I'm not mistaken, if I have www. in front, then HTTP_HOST consists of www. plus the main domain name, doesn't it? –  Pekka 웃 Mar 11 '11 at 20:19
    
ohh! You are right! This has become a bigger headache, I think. –  StackOverflowNewbie Mar 11 '11 at 23:16

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