Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

EDIT: When I remove the index on the column that I'm searching in, the response time goes from around 2.5 to around 2.6 sec. Should the difference not be a hell of lot more?

I'm writing a small application that uses a jquery autosuggest plugin. The user starts typing the name of his home town and my code queries a table of 2.7 million rows containing city names (maxmind city database) with AJAX. I set an index on the db column being searched (city_name).

When I run the following query (using CodeIgniter Active Record) CI's benchmark class reports 2.1922 sec (for that query only, so this does not include html page load times).

SELECT * FROM cities WHERE city_name LIKE "%bang%"

When I run the same query in phpmyadmin I get: Query took 0.0068 sec


When I run

SELECT * FROM cities WHERE city_name LIKE "%bangkok%"

CI's benchmark class reports 2.1951 sec. When I run this same query in phpmyadmin I get: Query took 2.1811 sec.

So while CI's response times are almost identical for both queries, the ones run in phpmyadmin are vastly different.

Questions

  • Obviously querying 2.7 million rows will be relatively slow, but is there any way I get can decent response times for such an auto suggest functionality? 2.5 sec is way too slow. AFAIK there is no fast way to search with a "LIKE" syntax in a PHP array containing all 2.7 million rows. Would memcache be an option?

  • Why are the response time differences negligible when using CI Active Record, but so vastly different in phpmyadmin?

share|improve this question
1  
Just an aside, you might be getting vastly different results because you keep running the same query. –  JohnP Mar 11 '11 at 11:39
    
+1 for JohnP's answer. I'm inclined to agree with JohnP, when you're running the same query over and over caching can come into play. –  m4rc Mar 11 '11 at 12:59
    
I'm running all queries several times before posting the response times. –  stef Mar 11 '11 at 13:07
    
Have you tried full text indexing and searching with MATCH()? Another suggestion: try "bang%" as Sebastian Hoitz suggested a below comment. Another: try to segment the db in a separate db like cities_a, cities_b.... Just another: if you are desperate and have access to custom apps, you can try something like Sphinx, Solr, ... –  Halil Özgür Mar 11 '11 at 15:43
    
How did you solve this @stef? –  Puigcerber Apr 2 '12 at 14:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can get significant benefit (at least 100 times faster) by indexing the column you are searching for.

Take a look at 7.3.1. How MySQL Uses Indexes.

EDIT

Either phpmyadmin and your benchmark tool are running on the same machine? Phpmyadmin is supposed to run on the same machine than the database, but the benchmark tool could not. In the time measuring, the benchmark tool might probably take into account the network time overload (not the html rendering page).

share|improve this answer
    
In phpmyadmin I set an index on the db column being searched (city_name), as indicated in original post. So all the results you see are with index –  stef Mar 11 '11 at 12:02
    
Sorry, answered too fast. By the way, either phpmyadmin and your benchmark tool are running on the same machine? Phpmyadmin is supposed to run on the same machine than the database, but the benchmark tool could not. In the time measuring, might the benchmark tool probably take into account the network time overload (not the html rendering page)? –  Luca Fagioli Mar 11 '11 at 12:09
1  
But when you are using like '%bang%' it can't use the index. Only when using like 'bang%' it will use the index. Try using "explain select" to see the difference. –  Sebastian Hoitz Mar 11 '11 at 13:41
    
@Sebastian: Is the database is using a trie to index? –  Phpdna Mar 11 '11 at 14:26
    
+1 Good tip Sebastian. –  Luca Fagioli Mar 11 '11 at 19:11

Most likely what you want is a trie like database, or a kart-trie. It's a dictionary data structure and you can load all the cities in your memory. But you can also make a database from it. Then you want to reduce the complexity of the trie to a nested-set. A kart-trie differs from a radix-trie or patricia-trie that it has maximum 2 leafs per node that is then very easy to reduce to a nested-set.

share|improve this answer
3  
I really have no idea what you're talking about. –  stef Mar 11 '11 at 13:06
1  
Do you know a nested set hierarchical tree? It eliminates the need to make a full scan of the table in question. –  Phpdna Mar 11 '11 at 13:41
2  
Googling for "trie" or "kart-trie" would probably clarify what epitaph meant. Trie (from re trie val) is a data structure that allows for fast searches. Your problem lies in (most likely) bad table design because you're forcing your DB to perform full table scan by doing LIKE searches, which for autocomplete purposes isn't efficient - hence, there are data-structures that help you get around performance problems. –  Michael J.V. Apr 6 '11 at 10:47
1  
+1 for trie, too bad some were too lazy to try and google it before upvoting a useless comment :/ –  N.B. Jul 30 '13 at 15:18

Query cache is enabled by default; you need to add SQL_NO_CACHE to your query to bypass:

SELECT SQL_NO_CACHE * FROM TABLE...

More here: MySQL - force not to use cache for testing speed of query

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.