Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code on an asp.net button click

if(str == ipaddr1 || ipaddr2 || ipaddr3 || ipaddr4 || ipaddr5 || ipaddr6 || ipaddr7)
// do this
else
//cancel click event

How can I optimize this piece of code?

Update: Apologies everyone! I did not mean to compare it with the literal string ipaddr. I mean to compare it to the value ipaddr1, ipaddr2 holds and so on

share|improve this question
    
Optimize for what? Performance? Readability? Maintainability? –  Steven Mar 11 '11 at 11:38
3  
Note that your example only compares str to "ipaddr1". This is likely a mistake. –  dandan78 Mar 11 '11 at 11:38
    
is it possible to push those ipaddrX into a string list, you would have them together also instead of keeping diff values\ –  V4Vendetta Mar 11 '11 at 11:42
    
I have updated my question. I want to compare str with the value of all these strings –  Matt Kraven Mar 11 '11 at 11:43
1  
Again, you're just comparing str and ipaddr1. You have to write str == ipaddr1 || str == ipaddr2 || ... –  dandan78 Mar 11 '11 at 11:46
show 1 more comment

6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

HashSet<T> is the best container to check containing:

var ips = new HashSet<string> { "ip1", "ip2", "ip3", "ip4", "ip5" };
if (ips.Contains(input))
{
    // do stuff
}

For any type:

var ips = new HashSet<IPHostEntry> { ip1, ip2, ip3, ip4, ip5 };
if (ips.Contains(input))
{
    // do stuff
}

Was:

if(str = qry.StartsWith("23.55") || str = qry.StartsWith("xuz") || str = qry.StartsWith("i3") || str = qry.StartsWith("i444") || str = qry.StartsWith("ki5") || str = qry.StartsWith("65fr6")) // do this else // do this

Become:

var arr = new[] { "23.55", "xuz", "i3",  "i444", "ki5", "65fr6") };
if (arr.Any(str => input.StartsWith(str, StringComparison.Ordinal))
{
    // do stuff
}

StringComparison.Ordinal or StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase are very important for performance.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks you. I have another similar problem. How to optimize this code? if(str = qry.StartsWith("23.55") || str = qry.StartsWith("xuz") || str = qry.StartsWith("i3") || str = qry.StartsWith("i444") || str = qry.StartsWith("ki5") || str = qry.StartsWith("65fr6")) // do this else // do this –  Matt Kraven Mar 11 '11 at 11:50
    
@Matt: I updated my post. Also you tilde to highlight source code into comments –  abatishchev Mar 11 '11 at 11:53
    
thanks I need more clarification please. What is input and str and how will i use them? I want to compare X with a set of strings to see if X begins with the value any of these strings contain? Probaby I am not able to convey my question correctly. Thanks for being patient. –  Matt Kraven Mar 11 '11 at 12:01
    
I am thinking do I really need str here. Why not just do if(qry.StartsWith("23.55") || qry.StartsWith("xuz") || ...) –  Matt Kraven Mar 11 '11 at 12:03
    
@Matt: Any() is LINQ extension method, (str => ..) is lambda expression bit.ly/fH3RZN input is a variable, string to compare, what you call qry, what ever. –  abatishchev Mar 11 '11 at 12:09
show 2 more comments

replace with:

Regex.IsMatch(str, "^ipaddr[1-7]$")

Optimised for readability not necessarily performance.

share|improve this answer
    
I am sorry. I realized i confused everyone by posting the wrong string. question updated –  Matt Kraven Mar 11 '11 at 11:42
add comment

What about

if(str.Substring(0,6) == "ipaddr" && str[6] >= '1' && str[6] <= '7')

For your information, your original code does not even compile. This

if(str == "ipaddr1" || "ipaddr2" || "ipaddr3" || "ipaddr4" || "ipaddr5" || "ipaddr6" || "ipaddr7")

Needs to be replaced with this to compile

if(str == "ipaddr1" || str == "ipaddr2" || str == "ipaddr3" || str == "ipaddr4" || str == "ipaddr5" || str == "ipaddr6" || str == "ipaddr7")

So the original code is actually even more tedious than you thought.

UPDATE

According to your updated question, the best option is to put your string variables into a List<string> called, for example ipaddr. Then to see if the string str is included, simply do this:

if( ipaddr.Contains( str ) )
{
   //contained in the list
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

I would do something like:

str.Length == 7 && str.StartsWith("ipaddr") && str[6] > '0' && str[6] < '8'

Edit:

After your update, I would do something like:

string[] validStrings = { ipaddr1, ipaddr2, ... };
bool isStrValid = validStrings.Contains(str);

For better performance, consider using a HashSet<string> instead of an array, especially if the list of valid strings doesn't change.

share|improve this answer
    
Checking containing against an array is definitely slow - O(n) –  abatishchev Mar 11 '11 at 11:50
add comment

Both more readable, and more performant would be:

switch(str)
{
case "ipaddr1": 
case "ipaddr2":
case "ipaddr3":
case "ipaddr4":
case "ipaddr5":
case "ipaddr6":
case "ipaddr7":
    //do something
    break;
default:
    //do something else
    break;
}

(although, admittedly massively verbose...)

share|improve this answer
add comment

I would do a

List<string> variables = new List<string> { "ip1","ip2","ip3","ip4","ip5" };

if (variables.Contains(inputstring))
  ...
share|improve this answer
    
Well.. This answer may be valid then... (again?) :p –  Independent Mar 11 '11 at 11:49
    
Checking containing against array or List<T> is definitely slow - O(n) –  abatishchev Mar 11 '11 at 11:55
    
On which scenario is it slow? Comparing seven items with short strings. I will check youre hashset way to do it. Interesting. –  Independent Mar 11 '11 at 12:03
    
Regarding performance and .Contains(), it's still has limitation on 2100 items, when used against a sql query? –  Independent Mar 11 '11 at 12:06
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.