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I have 2 files:

1 is main.cpp

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

int min(int,int);
int abs(int);
int gcd(int,int);

const char *s = "Read Error!!";

int main()
{
  cout << "Enter first Value: ";
  int i;
  cin >> i;
  while(!cin)
  {
    cout << s << endl;
    cin >> i;
  }

  cout << "Enter second Value: ";
  int j;
  cin >> j;
  while(!cin)
  {
    cout << s << endl;
    cin >> j;
  }

  cout << "\nmin: " << min(i,j) << endl;
  i = abs(i);
  j = abs(j);
  cout << "gcd: " << gcd(i,j) << endl;
  return 0;
}

##2 is gcd.cpp
inline int abs(int iobj)
{
  return iobj < 0 ? -iobj : iobj;
}


inline int min(int p1,int p2)
{
  return p1 < p2 ? p1 : p2;
}


int gcd(int v1, int v2)
{
  while(v2)
  {
    int temp = v2;
    v2 = v1 % v2;
    v1 = temp;
  }
  return v1;
}

Now the problem is when 1 compile the 2 files there is no problem for obvious reasons, however i am getting an error at the time of Linking: main.cpp:(.text+0x100): undefined reference to `min(int, int)' When i comment line the statement containing the call of min() it works. Now, why in the world abs() is working, gcd() is working but min() is not??? I am using g++ in Linux.

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1  
Remove the inline qualifier from abs and min in gcd.cpp –  Paul R Mar 11 '11 at 11:46
2  
Have you heard of indentation? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 11 '11 at 11:49
    
Can you make your question title a bit more descriptive? Pretty much every question in this tag is "regarding a sample CPP project". –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 11 '11 at 11:50
    
Technically these inline functions do have external linkage. But when you use the inline keyword, the function must be defined in every translation unit that uses it. So inline function definitions should be in a header file, not a *.cpp file. –  aschepler Mar 11 '11 at 14:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

abs "works" because it is in the standard C library as a regular function. Your homebrew abs never gets exported from its module because it is inline.

The same happens with min, but that is not available in the standard library, except as a template.

My advice: import <cstdlib> and <algorithm>, and use std::abs and std::min instead.

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2  
Well in simple words, does it imply - inline functions have static linkage?? –  al-Acme Mar 11 '11 at 12:06
    
@Acme: yes. parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/inline-functions.html#faq-9.6 (The intent of the inline keyword is to make functions with no linkage, i.e. to have them expanded inline by the compiler rather than the linker.) –  larsmans Mar 11 '11 at 12:08

If you are just trying to learn and want to see your own code called for abs, min, and gcd you could rename them to something like "my_abs" "my_min" and "my_gcd" in both files and then remove the inline keyword from the declarations.

For example:

// gcd.cpp

// renamed abs to my_abs to avoid name collision with std library function.
int my_abs(int iobj)
{
    return (iobj<0?-iobj:iobj);
}

You have some other options like calling abs/min/gcd using the global scope resoultion operation like "::abs(i). But if you are new to programming and just trying to get a feel for writing code I think renaming the functions is the simplest approach to get your feet wet.

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Abs is probably working because there is an "abs" function in the std. You should add headers and prototype for your code to work : currently, your file 1 ignores everything that exists in your file 2.

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The functions are declared with full prototype in main.cpp. gcd is properly exported. –  larsmans Mar 11 '11 at 11:53

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