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I have an app that currently uses a SQLite database that is created at runtime in a directory on the user's PC. It's fine, but the nature and usage of the data doesn't really need a relational approach. On the other hand, I can use SQLite just by its DLL being visible somewhere on the path.

I'm wondering about using a NOSQL, document-style DB instead, since that would seem to be more appropriate to my needs. For various enterprise-IT type reasons, I don't want to have to (and in several cases just plain can't) install any additional software or start any additional processes. So MongoDB, for example, appears to be out, as it requires starting mongod.exe.

Are there any NoSQL databases that I can use simply by having a DLL on the path, in the way that I can with SQLite?

(I hope the title isn't completely misleading)

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In other words, you are looking for an embedded NoSQL database? Check this similar question stackoverflow.com/questions/2081080/… – Panagiotis Kanavos Mar 11 '11 at 12:24

You may want to look into Berkeley DB. It's a library, like SQLite, but it supports both an XML and a Key-Value API. The Key-Value API is available in either of the three libraries, Berkeley DB, Berkeley DB XML or Berkeley DB Java Edition. The XML API is available in the Berkeley DB XML library. All of the above run on lots of platforms, including Windows. The Berkeley DB and Berkeley DB Java Edition libraries are under 1 MB in size, while the Berkeley DB library is about 4MB.

Berkeley DB is mentioned as one of the options in the stackoverflow question mentioned above.

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