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I am asking a user to enter a number, in which I want to print the item held at that index point in the list..

This is the code i currently have:

List = ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f"]

print "The list has the following", len(List), "list:", List

new_item = raw_input("Which item would you like to add? ")
List.append(new_item)
print "The list has the following", len(List), "items:", List

Number = raw_input ("Please select a number: ")
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3  
What's your question? –  Dave Costa Mar 11 '11 at 12:45
1  
print List[Number]? –  Thomas K Mar 11 '11 at 12:47
    
By asking the user to enter a number.... i want the item in that index to be displayed.. e.g. if the user enters 2 i want "c" ti be displayed.. ive been messing about with more code but just cannot seem to get it working. –  IrishGal Mar 11 '11 at 12:49
    
Thomas K >> I've tried that but the error that appears is ''TypeError: list indices must be integers, not str'' –  IrishGal Mar 11 '11 at 12:50
    
ask the person who has written the first 6 lines of the program –  Anurag Uniyal Mar 11 '11 at 12:53
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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try converting Number to an integer first:

i = int(Number)                                                                 
print "You selected:", List[i]

Incidentally, it's good Python style to make variables lower case, and keep identifiers that begin with a capital letter for classes. So, instead of List you could use my_list and instead of Number just use number. (You shouldn't use list as a variable name since that will hide the built-in list type.)

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Thanks Mark!! :) –  IrishGal Mar 11 '11 at 12:55
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l = ["a", "b", "c"]
ii = raw_input("Please select a number: ")
print l[ii]
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Only thing to remember here is that indexing starts from 0, not 1 –  Alex Leach Mar 11 '11 at 12:50
    
The error that appears is 'TypeError: list indices must be integers, not str' when i do that Jim –  IrishGal Mar 11 '11 at 12:52
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What you are attempting to do is called "indexing" a string. It is achieved as follows

letter_at_index = my_list[index]

Note that indices start from 0, that is,

my_list = ['a', 'b', 'c']
a = my_list[0]
b = my_list[1]
c = my_list[2]

Negative indices can be specified as well, for example

c = my_list[-1]

More info under Sequence Types here

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List = ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f"]
print "The list has the following", len(List), "list:", List
try:
    Number = raw_input ("Please select a number: ")
    item = List[int(Number)]
    print "The list item at", Number, "is", item
except EOFError:
    print "Error.  Nothing entered"
except ValueError:
    print "Error.  Expecting a number instead of:", Number
except IndexError:
    print "Error.  Number out of range:", Number
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List = ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f"]

print "The list has the following length: "+str( len(List))+ "\n list:"+repr( List)

List.append(raw_input("\nWhich item would you like to add? "))

print "\nThe list has the following length: "+str( len(List))+ "\n list:"+repr( List)

print '\nThe item at the position you entered is : '+\
      repr(List[int(raw_input ("\nPlease select a number: "))])[1:-1]

Result

The list has the following length: 6
 list:['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f']

Which item would you like to add? (12,52,145)

The list has the following length: 7
 list:['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', '(12,52,145)']

Please select a number: 6

The item at the position you entered is : (12,52,145)
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try the following:

i = None
listend = len(List)-1
while i == None:
    try:
        print ''
        raw = raw_input("Which item would you like to add? ")
        i = int(raw)
        value = List[i]
    except IndexError:
        print i, 'is out of bounds. Expecting an integer from 0 to', listend 
        i = None
    except:
        print 'You entered "%s" however I was expecting an integer from 0 to %s'%(raw, listend)
    else:
        print 'Result:', List[i]

It is often useful to loop while waiting for acceptable input in this way - you will notice that i is only set to something other than None if int(raw) runs successfully, and if it is out of your list's bounds you set it back to None. The else statement is not strictly necessary as its content could go outside of the while loop, however it seem to be the situation it was designed for - running a block of code only if the try block has not thrown an exception, while not handling exceptions itself.

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