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I'd like to print durations given in milliseconds with different format specification depending on its size:

case (1)      "H:mm"  if duration < 10 hours
case (2)     "HH:mm"  if duration < 24 hours
case (3)  "#d HH:mm"  else (duration >= 24 hours)

which means only 1 hour field digit for durations lower than 10 hours,
but 2 hour field digits when having a leading day field!

Examples:

case (1)      "0:45"  means 45 minutes,
              "1:23"  means 1 hour and 23 minutes,
case (2)     "12:05"  means 12 hours and 5 minutes and
case (3)  "1d 05:09"  means 1 day, 5 hours and 9 minutes
                               (= 29 hours and 9 minutes).

I had tried with

object JodaTest {
  import org.joda.time._
  private val pdf = {
    import format._
    val pfb = new PeriodFormatterBuilder()
      .appendDays.appendSeparator("d ")
      .printZeroAlways
      .minimumPrintedDigits(2).appendHours.appendSeparator(":")
      .appendMinutes
    new PeriodFormatter(pfb.toPrinter, null)
  }
  def durstr(duration: Long): String =
    pdf.print((new Period(duration)).normalizedStandard)
}

which leads to

  2700000 => "00:45"     but should be "0:45"
  4980000 => "01:23"     but should be "1:23"
 43500000 => "12:05"
104940000 => "1d 05:09"

but I don't know how to omit leading zero of two-digit-day-representation in case (1) but simultaneously force to print it in case (3) with same PeriodFormat.

Is it possible to do that with a single org.joda.time.format.PeriodFormatter?

share|improve this question
    
Wouldn't a minimumPrintedDigits(1) at first and a minimumPrintedDigits(2) before minutes work? –  Daniel C. Sobral Mar 11 '11 at 20:58
    
@Daniel Think that minimumPrintedDigits(1) is default (and can be omitted), nevertheless I've tried out, it works fine in first two cases but in case (3) it leaves to 104940000 => "1d 5:09" while 104940000 => "1d 05:09" is desired. - P.S.: ... had some trouble with my enter key ;-) –  binuWADa Mar 11 '11 at 21:33
    
Ah, I see... Well, it almost did it. :-) –  Daniel C. Sobral Mar 11 '11 at 21:39
    
@Daniel Thanks for your comment, I found a bug in the case (3) in my answer too and adpated the test suite and fixed it by inserting .minimumPrintedDigits(2).appendMinutes as you proposed. –  binuWADa Mar 11 '11 at 21:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can implement the PeriodPrinter interface to format the period exactly as you want, then use the builder to set up the formatter.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll take a deeper look at PeriodPrinter interface and respond once again a little bit later. –  binuWADa Mar 22 '11 at 19:27
    
Okay, with implementing PeriodPrinter interface and constructing it with the builder I can obtain an arbitrary PeriodFormatter => that answered my question. –  binuWADa Mar 25 '11 at 22:22

Perhaps not a real answer but meanwhile I'm afraid that you need two PeriodFormatter to solve this task, so manage it with

object JodaTest {
  import org.joda.time._
  import format._
  private def pdf(digits: Int) = new PeriodFormatter(
    new PeriodFormatterBuilder()
      .appendDays.appendSeparator("d ")
      .printZeroAlways
      .minimumPrintedDigits(digits).appendHours.appendSeparator(":")
      .minimumPrintedDigits(2).appendMinutes
      .toPrinter, null)
  private lazy val pdf1 = pdf(1)
  private lazy val pdf2 = pdf(2)
  def durstr(duration: Long): String = {
    val period = new Period(duration).normalizedStandard
    val pdf = if (period.getDays > 0) pdf2 else pdf1
    pdf.print(period)
  }
}

which leads to desired

  2700000 => "0:45"
  4980000 => "1:23"
 43500000 => "12:05"
104940000 => "1d 05:09".
share|improve this answer

Still found a solution with only one PeriodFormatter but doing a little work outside Joda-Time.

The idea is to

  1. Produce a raw formatted string like "000d 00:00" with Joda-Time and
  2. remove unwanted leading zeros separately

with

object JodaTest {
  import org.joda.time._
  import format._
  // "000d 00:00" - 3 day digits for periods with up to 999 days long
  private val pdf = new PeriodFormatter(new PeriodFormatterBuilder()
    .printZeroAlways
    .minimumPrintedDigits(3).appendDays.appendSeparator("d ")
    .minimumPrintedDigits(2).appendHours.appendSeparator(":").appendMinutes
    .toPrinter, null)
  private def adjust(rawstr: String): String = {
    // "000d 00:00" => ("000d 0", "0:00")
    val (first, second) = rawstr splitAt 6
    // remove unwanted leading zeros in first part, keep it in second
    first.dropWhile(c => !c.isDigit || c == '0') + second
  }
  def durstr(duration: Long): String = {
    // PeriodType.dayTime => day is the most significant field (no weeks etc.)
    adjust(pdf.print(new Period(duration) normalizedStandard PeriodType.dayTime))
  }
}

which leads to

   duration =>       rawstr =>       adjust
          0 => "000d 00:00" =>       "0:00"
    2700000 => "000d 00:45" =>       "0:45"
    4980000 => "000d 01:23" =>       "1:23"
   43500000 => "000d 12:05" =>      "12:05"
  104940000 => "001d 05:09" =>   "1d 05:09"
  518760000 => "006d 00:06" =>   "6d 00:06"
  605220000 => "007d 00:07" =>   "7d 00:07"
  951060000 => "011d 00:11" =>  "11d 00:11"
43230000000 => "500d 08:20" => "500d 08:20"

Of course, it would be nice to build such formats directly with Joda-Time by specifying a pattern like an Excel number format (#,##0.00#) to say where one want zeros ever or only if required. But it seems not clear how to define it exactly because you have not only '0' and '#' but need chars for each field and put literals into format string (perhaps via escaping) would be nice too.

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