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I wrote a sql query to retrieve data as follows:

SELECT (MAX (b.filledqty) - MAX (a.filledqty)) AS filledtoday   
FROM clientordermas a, 
     clientordermas b  
WHERE a.clordid = 'w9110126'    
  AND b.clordid = 'w9110126'    
  AND (SELECT max(a.price) 
       FROM clientordermas a 
       WHERE a.clordid = 'w9110126') < 1000;

There are three records in the table for the given clordid with price values 800, 900 1200.

So, what I need is to get the difference between 1200 and 900 which is 300.

But, the above statement always returns 0. What I should get is MAX (b.filledqty) retuns 1200 and MAX (a.filledqty) retuns 900.

But it is not happening. This is not the exact problem I am facing but a simplified version of it.

Can someone please help?

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You want the Top2 answers, not Max. –  ypercube Mar 11 '11 at 14:25
    
not related but you should use HAVING MAX(a.price) < 1000 –  Jean-Christophe Fortin Mar 11 '11 at 14:26
    
Elaborate in what you want to get, not in database terms, but in business rules terms... it is easy to write a query to get this in the particular case you mentioned... but I'm pretty sure you want a general solution, not just for this particular data. –  jachguate Mar 11 '11 at 18:09
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming that 1000 is a magic value that should indeed be hardcoded:

SELECT MAX(filledqty) - MAX(CASE WHEN price < 1000 THEN filledqty ELSE NULL END)
  FROM clientordermas
  WHERE clordid='w9110126';

You might want to replace ELSE NULL with ELSE 0, depending on what result you want if there is no value less than 1000.

Edit Realized I had partially misread the question so the second part of my answer was irrelevant. Changed the above to reference price where appropriate.

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i guess that a max(null) will break the statement and result nothing ? –  Uw Concept Mar 11 '11 at 14:31
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What business rule is the clause checking for max() < 1000 doing? You are looking for the max value above 1000 minus the max value below 1000?

If that is the case then:

select a.price - b.price
from (select clorid, max(price) as price from  clientordermas a WHERE a.clordid = 'w9110126' and price > 1000) a,
join (select clorid, max(price) as price from  clientordermas a WHERE a.clordid = 'w9110126' and price < 1000) b
on a.clorid = b.clorid;

although you need to expand the business rules I think to handle the case where a clorid doesn't have a value over 1000, or it doesn't have a vlaue under 1000.

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i'm guessing that you have the same records in a and b. So the result of 1200 - 1200 equals 0.

SELECT (MAX (b.filledqty) - MAX (a.filledqty)) AS filledtoday   
FROM clientordermas a, 
     clientordermas b  
WHERE a.clordid = 'w9110126'    
  AND b.clordid = 'w9110126'    
  AND a.price < 1000;

Does this do any difference for you ?

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This is correct. But In my realcase price is not a field in that tabel. Its invoves another calculation –  nath Mar 11 '11 at 14:33
    
Am i correct that your two column results are 1200 and 1200 ? Then it can only be the "WHERE" clause that's wrong. (btw:) if you use a subselect with a new table, it won't be referenced to the one in your "FROM" clause. –  Uw Concept Mar 11 '11 at 14:37
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One way to do it (Select the difference between the Top 2 DISTINCT filledqties):

SELECT ( ( SELECT max(c.filledqty) 
             FROM clientordermas c 
             WHERE c.clordid = 'w9110126'
         )
         - MAX (a.filledqty)
       ) AS filledtoday   
  FROM clientordermas a 
  WHERE a.clordid = 'w9110126'    
    AND a.filledqty <
        ( SELECT max(b.filledqty) 
            FROM clientordermas b 
            WHERE b.filledqty= 'w9110126'
        )
;

But Dave Costa gave you a method for this that works better in Oracle.

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I think you got your SQL concepts wrong.

What actually happened is that you get a 3x3 = 9 row cross join table, with duplicated fields.

Your last where clause is a fixed result. So which means that MAX(b.filledqty) - MAX(a.filledqty) is operated on this 9-row table. Of course, both max values are the same (i.e. 1200). The result is zero.

If what you want is to find the difference between the max value and the min value, try something like this:

SELECT TOP 1 (b.filledqty - a.filledqty) AS filledtoday
FROM clientordermas a INNER JOIN clientordermas b ON (a.clordid=b.clordid)
WHERE a.clordid = '...'
ORDER BY a.filledqty, b.filledqty DESC

This query first does an inner self join which duplicates the necessary column, then sort one column ascending and the other column descending. The first resulting combination will have the max and min values.

If you want to find the difference between the max value and the second-to-max value, try this:

SELECT TOP 1 (b.filledqty - a.filledqty) AS filledtoday
FROM clientordermas a INNER JOIN clientordermas b ON (a.clordid=b.clordid)
WHERE a.filledqty <> b.filledqty    (*this filters out max-max combo*)
WHERE a.clordid = '...'
ORDER BY a.filledqty DESC, b.filledqty DESC

The top row in the result set contains the max and second-to-max value -- the second-to-max value is taken as the top value that is not the same as the max value.

If you want to find the difference between the max value and the top value that is < 1000, try this:

SELECT TOP 1 (b.filledqty - a.filledqty) AS filledtoday
FROM clientordermas a INNER JOIN clientordermas b ON (a.clordid=b.clordid)
WHERE a.filledqty <> b.filledqty AND b.filledqty < 1000
WHERE a.clordid = '...'
ORDER BY a.filledqty DESC, b.filledqty DESC
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