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I've decided to completely rewrite my old PHP project from the ground up. Before, I had one file for each page and now I'd like to use MVC pattern approach with one point of entry instead. The project itself is quite big and I'm trying to build my own framework so I can integrate everything nicely.

I've searched stackoverflow for similar questions and I've found some but they had quite different folder structures so I decided to post my own.

Folder structure so far

/applications
    /administration
        /private
            /controllers
            /models
            /views
            configuration.php
        /public
            /ajax
            /fonts
            /icons
            /images
            /stylesheets
        index.php
    /website
        /private
            /controllers
            /models
            /views
            configuration.php
        /public
            /ajax
            /fonts
            /icons
            /images
            /stylesheets
        index.php
/backups
/library
    /helpers
        datetime.php
        text.php
    controller.php
    model.php

Details

  • /applications - I've separated administration from the normal website and I'll also use different sub-domain for the administration.
  • /applications/app/private - Access to this folder is blocked by nginx.
  • /applications/app/public - As the name suggests, everything that's visible on the web.
  • /applications/app/index.php - Entry point for each website.
  • /backups - Database backups.
  • /library - Base controllers / models reside here.
  • /library/helpers - All helper classes that will be used in both websites are here so I don't need to copy/paste them into both applications.

Main questions

Is this a good way to structure my website or would you do things differently? Are there any pitfalls I might encounter with this structure? Is there anything I'm missing?

All help is very appreciated!

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Gordon Sep 15 '13 at 9:18

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
I guess it depends on how you want it. but using a view i also think it would be ok to use theme folders so you can use themes. What might help is taking a look at existing MVC frameworks and how they build their folder structure. But yours looks fine and is easy to understand that's the most important thing! –  FLY Mar 11 '11 at 15:39
1  
I'd remove backups from this folder structure if I were you, unless you have a good reason to do otherwise. I wouldn't say backups belong in somewhere accessible by the web-server 'user' anyway, for security's sake. Paranoid eh? :) –  Jeff Parker Mar 11 '11 at 15:47
    
just look at YII or the other framework.. but the question is: why reinvent the wheel? –  dynamic Mar 11 '11 at 15:54
    
@mario When was the last time you saw an MVC project without a directory structure which reinforced the concept? :P –  Jeff Parker Mar 11 '11 at 16:08
1  
@mario It's MVC with DDD, you know. Directory Driven Development ;) –  Gordon Mar 11 '11 at 17:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm using a similar structure (with homemade framework too but backup out of webroot). You could maybe add a "form" folder in the private folder.

I use this to make controller more readable. The forms are generaly a big wall of object code. Putting them in an external file included in the controller is a good idea.

Don't forget to exclude the public folder from the rewriting rules and everything should be allright :)

An other solution is to put index.php in your public folder and define this folder as your webroot in nginx. It prevent remote access to all other file (like backup file) which should used only by the framework.

/applications
    /administration
        /private
            /controllers
            /models
            /views
            configuration.php
        /public <---- Vhost WebRoot
            /ajax
            /fonts
            /icons
            /images
            /stylesheets
            index.php
    /website
        /private
            /controllers
            /models
            /views
            configuration.php
        /public <---- Vhost WebRoot
            /ajax
            /fonts
            /icons
            /images
            /stylesheets
            index.php
/backups
/library
    /helpers
        datetime.php
        text.php
    controller.php
    model.php
share|improve this answer

The MVC pattern has absolutely nothing to do with your application's folder layout.

Whether you put all your files into one single folder or use a layout like shown in your question is completely irrelevant. It's not getting more or less MVC from it, because MVC is not about folders, but about splitting user interface interaction into three distinct roles.

Unless you are following a code convention that demands a certain file naming scheme (like PEAR), the only thing important for your application is that your Autoloader can find the files at runtime somehow. So if you think the layout shown above is good for you, go with it.

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1  
I think that pretty much sums it up. The fixed directory and include naming scheme is used in lieu of an autoloader, not because the application design demands it. –  mario Mar 11 '11 at 17:43
    
I know MVC has nothing to do with folder structure. I was looking for examples of how other people who use MVC in PHP structure their projects. I doubt they just throw all files into one folder. I've changed my question title & removed the MVC tag to ease confusion. –  user554992 Mar 14 '11 at 5:37
    
@eSiks your folder layout is irrelevant. Like I said, the only important thing for your application is that the Autoloader can find the files with the classes. How files are organized at the filesystem is merely a convenience for you. There is no definite layout, so the question cannot be answered. The only other reasonable suggestion I can think of right now is that your application files should be outside the publicly accessible webroot. –  Gordon Mar 14 '11 at 8:24

Quick note: I would stay away from public/private folders as you're essentially locking yourself into two roles. An ACL implementation would be difficult/confusing in this situation.

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I guess administration and website is different modules of website.

Why dont you have a shared or core modules folder. For example, you have a database model named "User" and methods named createUser(), editUser(), listUsers(), changeRightsOfUser() and more more.. With this structure you need to write and abstract this model for all modules.

Your controllers is must be unique, this is okey. But models can be usable or extendable for every module.

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