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I have a base class with a virtual property and a derived type that overrides the virtual property. The type can be serialized to xml. What I am trying to do is NOT to persist the List of items property when the object is of the derived type. To acheive this the derived class decorates the overridden property with the [XMLIgnore] attribute. The virtual property in the base class does NOT apply XMLIgnore attribute. For some reason the List of items get serialized every even when the object is of the derived type (DynamicCart). When I apply XMLIgnore attribute to the virtual property in the base class the list does not get serialized to file.

public class ShoppingCart
{  
   public virtual List<items> Items{get; set;}

   //and other properties 

   public void SerializeToXML (string filePath)
   {
     xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(this.GetType());
     textWriter = new System.IO.StreamWriter(filePath);
     xmlSerializer.Serialize(textWriter, this);
     textWriter.Flush();
     textWriter.Close();  
   }

}

//A cart that is populated by algo based on parameters supplied by user. I have no need to
//persist the actual items across sessions.
class DynamicCart: ShoppingCart
{
   [XMLIgnore]
   public override List<items>{get;set;}
   //and other properties 
}

class Shop
{
   ShoppingCart cart= new DynamicCart();
   PopulateCart(cart);
   cart.serializeToXML(<PATH TO FILE>);
}
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It seems you answered the question yourself. –  Ondrej Tucny Mar 11 '11 at 15:38
    
I have implemented a work around but not an answer to my question, why does the XMLSerializer not honor the [XMLIgnore] attribute in the serived class and include the List<items> object when I serialize DynamicCart? –  Ken Mar 11 '11 at 22:46
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3 Answers

I think your serializer is using your base class instead of the derived.

public void SerializeToXML(string filePath, Type type)
{
    xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(type);
    textWriter = new System.IO.StreamWriter(filePath);
    xmlSerializer.Serialize(textWriter, this);
    textWriter.Flush();
    textWriter.Close();
}

class Shop
{
    ShoppingCart cart= new DynamicCart();
    PopulateCart(cart);
    cart.serializeToXML(<PATH TO FILE>, typeof(DynamicCart));
}
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Try this

  XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(DynamicCart), new Type[]{typeof(ShoppingCart)});

this will allow you to add as many types, you want serializer to inclusde.

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I guess you need to declare the derived type in the base class for XML serialization. Sounds a bit silly, but is by specification.

See this MSDN page, and look for the following example:

[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlInclude( typeof( Derived ) )]
public class Base
{
    // ...
}
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Adding this attribute to the class did not solve the problem. Serializer continued to serialize the List<Items> even though the the overridden property in the derived class had [XMLIgnore] attribute. I finally ended up; removing the overridden property from the derived class; and writing conditional serialization logic in the base class to apply the XMLIgnore attribute if the derived class is being serialized. –  Ken Mar 11 '11 at 22:34
    
Any clue as to why the serilizer does not honor the [XMLIgnore] attribute in my derived class?? –  Ken Mar 11 '11 at 22:39
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