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I am trying to make a sequence (for example, other collection types are also conceivable) comparable to other sequences.

class RichSeq[A](val seq: Seq[A]) extends Ordered[RichSeq[A]]

Of course there is a implicit conversion in the refered package object:

implicit def seq2RichSeq[A](s: Seq[A]) = new RichSeq(s)

Comparing means, first size matters than each element. Code makes it clear:

class RichSeq[A](val seq: Seq[A]) extends Ordered[RichSeq[A]] { 
  def compare(s: RichSeq[A]) = {
    seq.size compare s.seq.size match {
      case 0 => seq.view.zip(s.seq).map { case (x,y) => ord.compare(x,y) }.dropWhile(_ == 0).headOption.getOrElse(0)
      case x => x
    }
  }
}

But that doesn`t compile (of course) because one needs an ordering to compare the elements, so I tried that:

class RichSeq[A](val seq: Seq[A]) extends Ordered[RichSeq[A]] { 
  def compare(s: RichSeq[A])(implicit ord: Ordering[A]) = {
    // ...
  }
}

Now the signature of the compare method is not suitable, so I moved the implicit ord to the class signature (and adapted the implicit conversion):

implicit def seq2RichSeq[A](s: Seq[A])(implicit ord: Ordering[A]) = new RichSeq(s)
class RichSeq[A](val seq: Seq[A])(implicit ord: Ordering[A]) extends Ordered[RichSeq[A]] { 
  def compare(s: RichSeq[A]) = {
      // ...
    }
  }

But now I have a the problem, that all other methods in RichSeq that I want to use via implicit at a Seq[A] also require an implicit Ordering[A] and I can´t always deliver one. Sometimes I use my RichSeq by methods without Ordering and sometimes the compare method.

For example, sometimes I call

def distinctBy[B](f: A => B): Seq[A] = {
  seq.foldLeft { (Buffer[A](),MutMap[B,A]()) } {
    case ((b,m),x) if m contains f(x) => (b,m)
    case ((b,m),x) => 
      m += f(x) -> x
      b += x
      (b,m)
  }._1
}

meanwhile I am not able to define an Ordering[A].

I see one solution in having two different classes (with two implicit conversions):

class RichSeqOrderable[A](val seq: Seq[A])(implicit ord: Ordering[A]) extends Ordered[RichSeqOrderable[A]]

class RichSeq[A](val seq: Seq[A])

But I think that breaks the thought of having all stuff together?!?

share|improve this question
    
I'd go for two classes, but in the same file. – Anonymous Mar 11 '11 at 18:00
1  
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I went for something similar to paulp's suggestion:

class RichSeq[A](val seq: Seq[A])(implicit optionalOrd: Option[Ordering[A]] = None) extends Ordered[RichSeq[A]] {
  def compare(s: RichSeq[A]) = {
    seq.size compare s.seq.size match {
      case 0 => seq.view.zip(s.seq).map { case (x,y) => optionalOrd.map(_.compare(x,y)).getOrElse(0) }.dropWhile(_ == 0).headOption.getOrElse(0)
      case x => x
    }
  }
}

object RichSeq {
  implicit def orderingToSome[A](implicit ord: Ordering[A] = null) = Option(ord)
  implicit def seq2RichSeq[A](s: Seq[A])(implicit ord: Option[Ordering[A]]) = new RichSeq(s)
}

It's not a good thing to have too many implicits, particularly of types in the standard library. However, I think Ordering[A] => Option[Ordering[A]] is about as safe as it could be.

On chaining of implicits

Scala has a restriction on automatic conversions to add a method, which is that it won't apply more than one conversion in trying to find methods. For example:

class A(val n: Int)
class B(val m: Int, val n: Int)
class C(val m: Int, val n: Int, val o: Int) {
  def total = m + n + o
}

// This demonstrates implicit conversion chaining restrictions
object T1 { // to make it easy to test on REPL
  implicit def toA(n: Int) = new A(n)
  implicit def aToB(a: A) = new B(a.n, a.n)
  implicit def bToC(b: B) = new C(b.m, b.n, b.m + b.n)

  // won't work
  println(5.total)
  println(new A(5).total)

  // works
  println(new B(5, 5).total)
  println(new C(5, 5, 10).total)
}

However, if an implicit definition requires an implicit parameter itself, Scala will look for additional implicit values for as long as needed. Continue from the last example:

// def m[A <% B](m: A) is the same thing as
// def m[A](m: A)(implicit ev: A => B)

object T2 {
  implicit def toA(n: Int) = new A(n)
  implicit def aToB[A1 <% A](a: A1) = new B(a.n, a.n)
  implicit def bToC[B1 <% B](b: B1) = new C(b.m, b.n, b.m + b.n)

  // works
  println(5.total)
  println(new A(5).total)
  println(new B(5, 5).total)
  println(new C(5, 5, 10).total)
}

"Magic!", you might say. Not so. Here is how the compiler would translate each one:

object T1Translated {
  implicit def toA(n: Int) = new A(n)
  implicit def aToB(a: A) = new B(a.n, a.n)
  implicit def bToC(b: B) = new C(b.m, b.n, b.m + b.n)

  // Scala won't do this
  println(bToC(aToB(toA(5))).total)
  println(bToC(aToB(new A(5))).total)

  // Just this
  println(bToC(new B(5, 5)).total)

  // No implicits required
  println(new C(5, 5, 10).total)
}

object T2Translated {
  implicit def toA(n: Int) = new A(n)
  implicit def aToB[A1 <% A](a: A1) = new B(a.n, a.n)
  implicit def bToC[B1 <% B](b: B1) = new C(b.m, b.n, b.m + b.n)

  // Scala does this
  println(bToC(5)(x => aToB(x)(y => toA(y))).total)
  println(bToC(new A(5))(x => aTo(B(x)(identity _)).total)
  println(bToC(new B(5, 5))(identity _).total)

  // no implicits required
  println(new C(5, 5, 10).total)
}

So, while bToC is being used as an implicit conversion, aToB and toA are being passed as implicit parameters, instead of being chained as implicit conversions.

share|improve this answer
    
Since implicits are not chained, you would have to pass the Ordering[.] explicitly to seq2RichSeq for it to be implicitly converted to Option[Ordering[.]], wouldn't you? But how to pass something explicitly to an implicit conversion? – Raphael Mar 16 '11 at 11:42
    
What cannot be chained is implicit conversions to allow for a method. For example, if I have a conversion from A => B and B => C, I cannot, however, call a C method on A. Here, however, only one implicit conversion is taking place: seq2RichSeq. The chaining of implicit parameters, on the other hand, is allowed. So it takes an implicit Option[Ordering[A]], which is provided by orderingToSome which takes an implicit Ordering[A], which, itself, is provided implicitly, and maybe even by taking an implicit A => Ordered[A]. – Daniel C. Sobral Mar 16 '11 at 12:51
    
Huh. Does that imply that I cannot chain implicit methods, but can chain implicit functions? sratch his head Ah, no, wait: "chaining" is the wrong word to use here. You are nesting, not chaining, right? I wonder wether one could circumvent the chaining restriction by using nesting, that is build one implicit conversion by nesting several others, in a sense. – Raphael Mar 16 '11 at 13:15
    
@Raphael This was getting too confusing for comments, so I expanded my answer to discuss it. – Daniel C. Sobral Mar 16 '11 at 17:26
1  
@Raphael Indeed. I think I will do so. – Daniel C. Sobral Mar 16 '11 at 22:49

My usual preface that I wouldn't necessarily do things this way, but to use the question as an excuse to illuminate some lesser known features: here if any implicit ordering is available it will use that, but otherwise it will order them by hashcode.

package object foo {
  implicit def seq2RichSeq[A](s: Seq[A])(implicit ord: Ordering[A] = Ordering[Int].on((_: A).##)) = new RichSeq(s)
}
package foo {
  class RichSeq[A](val seq: Seq[A])(implicit ord: Ordering[A]) extends Ordered[RichSeq[A]] { 
    def compare(s: RichSeq[A]) = {
      seq.size compare s.seq.size match {
        case 0 => seq.view.zip(s.seq).map { case (x,y) => ord.compare(x,y) }.dropWhile(_ == 0).headOption.getOrElse(0)
        case x => x
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice. Another idea would be to compare string representations by default, in the hope that they somehow closely represent the objects in question. Hash codes are a cleaner solution in general, though, but with less meaning. In particular, it might put two objects with the same content far apart in the result, since hash code need not be equal for different objects with same content. – Raphael Mar 13 '11 at 10:22
    
Nice! A default ordering by hashcode! I really like to accept your answer, but Daniels answer very slightly appeals more to me. – Peter Schmitz Apr 27 '11 at 17:07

I have not coded it up completely, but why don't you do:

class RichSeq[A <: Ordered[A]](val seq: Seq[A]) extends Ordered[RichSeq[A]] {
  import Ordering.ordered 

  ...
}

The imported implicit conversion will give you Ordering[A] when necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
Then, I have the same problem: A has to be a Ordered[A] and that is not always possible. Sometimes I have neither Ordering[A] nor Ordered[A]. – Peter Schmitz Mar 11 '11 at 19:26
    
Then there is no use in creating a RichSeq of that type, at least as long as RichSeq <: Ordered[RichSeq]. – Raphael Mar 11 '11 at 22:09

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