Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to override the List object in C# in order to add a Median method like Sum or Average. I already found this function:

public static decimal GetMedian(int[] array)
{
    int[] tempArray = array;
    int count = tempArray.Length;

    Array.Sort(tempArray);

    decimal medianValue = 0;

    if (count % 2 == 0)
    {
        // count is even, need to get the middle two elements, add them together, then divide by 2
        int middleElement1 = tempArray[(count / 2) - 1];
        int middleElement2 = tempArray[(count / 2)];
        medianValue = (middleElement1 + middleElement2) / 2;
    }
    else
    {
        // count is odd, simply get the middle element.
        medianValue = tempArray[(count / 2)];
    }

    return medianValue;
}

Can you tell me how to do that?

share|improve this question
3  
Note that the GetMedian method you posted will have the side-effect of sorting the array that is passed into it. Since arrays are reference types, assigning the array to a new variable (tempArray) does not create a new array. –  Greg Mar 11 '11 at 15:58
    
In addition to what everyone else is saying here, there are also faster methods of finding the median that do not include sorting the entire list. (This will only matter if the lists are really huge though.) There is a modified form of quick-sort that will find the median without sorting the entire list. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Mar 14 '11 at 14:29
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use an extension method, and make a copy of the inputted array/list.

public static decimal GetMedian(this IEnumerable<int> source)
{
    // Create a copy of the input, and sort the copy
    int[] temp = source.ToArray();    
    Array.Sort(temp);

    int count = temp.Length;
    if (count == 0)
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException("Empty collection");
    }
    else if (count % 2 == 0)
    {
        // count is even, average two middle elements
        int a = temp[count / 2 - 1];
        int b = temp[count / 2];
        return (a + b) / 2m;
    }
    else
    {
        // count is odd, return the middle element
        return temp[count / 2];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I would check the size of the collection before trying to sort it. If the count is 0 throw the exception, if 1 return the only value temp[0], else, sort and do what you do. –  Moop Apr 10 '13 at 14:35
add comment

Do not use that function. It is deeply flawed. Check this out:

int[] tempArray = array;     
Array.Sort(tempArray); 

Arrays are reference types in C#. This sorts the array that you give it, not a copy. Obtaining the median of an array should not change its order; it might already be sorted into a different order.

Use Array.Copy to first make a copy of the array and then sort the copy.

share|improve this answer
1  
sometimes mind lingers about the CONST keyword:D –  luckyluke Mar 11 '11 at 16:03
add comment

I would definitely make those Extension Methods:

public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    public static decimal Median(this IEnumerable<int> list)
    {
        // Implementation goes here.
    }

    public static int Sum(this IEnumerable<int> list)
    {
        // While you could implement this, you could also use Enumerable.Sum()
    }
}

You could then use those methods in the following way:

List<int> values = new List<int>{ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
var median = values.Median();

Update

Oh...and as Eric mentions, you should find another implementation of Median. The one you provided not only modifies the original array in place but, if I'm reading it correctly, will also return an integer rather than the expected decimal.

share|improve this answer
    
I would make it Mediatn<T>(this List<T> list) to make it fully generic! otherwise that is recommened apporach –  luckyluke Mar 11 '11 at 16:01
    
@luckyluke - I would've done that, but there's no way to restrict T to numeric types. What happens when I call Median() on a List<string>? –  Justin Niessner Mar 11 '11 at 16:02
    
Extension methods are definitely the way to go. Preferably on the interface IList<int>. That way the method can be used for Lists and Arrays. –  Greg Mar 11 '11 at 16:02
    
@Greg - You're right...but you may as well take it one step further to use IEnumerable. –  Justin Niessner Mar 11 '11 at 16:04
    
Yea, possibly, I would do that with IComparable types or at least IEquatable –  luckyluke Mar 11 '11 at 16:14
show 2 more comments

You could create an extension method for the collection type you want to support. Then you'll be able to call it, just as if its part of that class.

MSDN - Extension Methods documentation and examples

share|improve this answer
add comment

Average and sum are Extension methods available for any IEnumerable providing the correct transformation function as a parameter MSDN

decimal Median<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> collection, Func<TSource,decimal> transform)
{
   var array = collection.Select(x=>transform(x)).ToArray();
   [...]
   return median;
}

transform will take a collection item and transform it to a decimal (averagable and comparable)

I won't dive here in the detail of the Median metho implementation, but it's not really complicated.

Edit: I Saw you added the further requirement of outputing a decimal average.

PS: parameter checking is ometted for brievety.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'll make some corrections to your method:

replace this:

     int[] tempArray = array; 

with:

     int[] tempArray = (int[])array.Clone();
share|improve this answer
add comment

You probably don't want to use sort to find median because there are more efficient way to calculate it otherwise. You can find the code for this which also adds Median as extension method for IList<T> in my following answer:

I need c# function that will calculate median

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.