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I have heard a lot of my friends talk about using wrappers in CSS to center the "main" part of a website.

Is this the best way to accomplish this? What is best practice? Are there other ways?

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There are multiple correct ways. I use a wrapper though, like your friends. –  BoltClock Mar 11 '11 at 16:14

7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Most basic example (live example here):

CSS:

#wrapper {
    width: 500px;
    margin: 0 auto;
}

HTML:

<body>
    <div id="wrapper">
        Piece of text inside a 500px width div centered on the page
    </div>
</body>

How the principle works:

Create your wrapper and assign it a certain width. Then apply an automatic horizontal margin to it by using margin: 0 auto; or margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;. The automatic margins make sure your element is centered.

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Which browser(s) requires text-align:left in this situation? –  Tom Dworzanski Mar 11 '13 at 8:22
    
@tom none do, actually. Seems to be a leftover from the demo CSS I pasted. Removing it to clarify the example. –  Aron Rotteveel Mar 11 '13 at 10:52
    
Just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something. Thanks. –  Tom Dworzanski Mar 11 '13 at 11:12
2  
Unless you're using only one <div id="wrapper"> per HTML file, you should go with @Hussein's <div class="wrapper"> to maintain valid HTML. –  Brandon Lebedev Jun 14 '13 at 16:11

You don't need a wrapper, just use the body as the wrapper.

CSS:

body {
    margin:0 auto;
    width:200px;
}

HTML:

<body>
    <p>some content</p>
<body>
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2  
why has this been marked down without comment? it absolutely works and requires less code than all other solutions offered so far? –  AlanG Mar 11 '11 at 16:25
    
Your example does not work.... –  Aron Rotteveel Mar 11 '11 at 16:28
2  
Well, you need to give it a width, otherwise it just stretches 100% across by default and you won't really see anything being centered... –  BoltClock Mar 11 '11 at 16:28
1  
yes, the body needs to be given a width, that seemed obvious: jsfiddle.net/alangilby/ER8NT –  AlanG Mar 11 '11 at 16:31
    
This is my favorite way to handle this issue. <body> is a block element just like a <div>. Nesting them is redundant. That frees up the class .wrapper for more universal adjustments within layout blocks. –  Wray Bowling May 16 '14 at 15:00
<div class="wrapper">test test test</div>

.wrapper{
    width:100px;
    height:100px;
    margin:0 auto;
}

Check working example at http://jsfiddle.net/8wpYV/

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See the basic build layout. How To Build a Basic CSS Layout

Also have a look here : Is it useful to #container, #Wrapper in every CSS layout?

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isitebuild link seems to be dead –  lkraav Mar 26 '13 at 11:10

The easiest way is to have a "wrapper" div element with a width set, and a left and right margin of auto.

Sample markup:

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
    <title></title>
    <style type="text/css">
        .wrapper { width: 960px; margin: 0 auto; background-color: #cccccc; }
        body { margin: 0; padding: 0 }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div class="wrapper">
        your content...
    </div>
</body>
</html>
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Are there other ways?

Negative margins were also used for horizontal (and vertical!) centering but there are quite a few drawbacks when you resize the window browser: no window slider; the content can't be seen anymore if the size of the window browser is too small.
No surprise as it uses absolute positioning, a beast never completely tamed!

Example: http://bluerobot.com/web/css/center2.html

So that was only FYI as you asked for it, margin: 0 auto; is a better solution.

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I think they mean use a div as the main container.

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