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enum MyEnum
{
    Invalid=0,
    Value1=1,
    Value1=2,
}

void main ()
{
    MyEnum e1 = MyEnum.Value1;
    int i1 = 2;

    // Is there any difference how to compare enumEration values with integers?
    if ( e1==(MyEnum)i1 )... // 1st

    if ( (int)e1==i1 )... // 2nd

In each of mentioned cases we have convertion of enum to int or int to enum.

Is there any difference in these conversions (performance, any other)? Or they are exactly the same?

Thanks.

P.S. In current example I compare to 'magic number' but in real application I am getting data from integer field from DB.

share|improve this question
1  
The enum type is introduced partly to avoid magic numbers. Why do you want to convert it back to integers? – Xichen Li Mar 11 '11 at 17:19
    
Cast Int To Enum may be of some help. – Brad Christie Mar 11 '11 at 17:20
4  
Go with the 2nd option. The 1st one can cause an exception if the integer is out of the defined range in your Enumeration. – Justin Mar 11 '11 at 17:21
4  
In current example I compare to 'magic number' but in real application I am getting data from integer field from DB. – Budda Mar 11 '11 at 17:22
    
That's not correct Justin. In C# an enum variable can be legally assigned any number from the base type (usually int) whether defined or not. Linqpad example program, no exception: void Main() { ((Test)500).Dump(); } enum Test { Yes, No } – Stephen Kennedy Aug 28 '14 at 9:05
up vote 7 down vote accepted

It doesn't matter which you use, they will perform identically. If there is no enum for an integer value, .net creates one at runtime. There can be no exceptions.

However, Xichen Li is correct - why would you want to compare an enum against an integer value?

share|improve this answer
4  
.NET doesn't need to "create" a value if it doesn't exist. Basically an enum value knows what type it is, but just contains the bits of the relevant integer. Why would anything need to be created? – Jon Skeet Mar 11 '11 at 17:24
    
Perhaps I didn't express myself correctly; what I was implying was that something like ((MyEnum)5).ToString() will produce what looks like a "new" member of the enum (assuming that MyEnum has no value == 5). – Melllvar Mar 11 '11 at 17:33
1  
Well, it'll return "5"... but I still wouldn't call that process "creating" a new value. It's how ToString behaves, that's all. The code involved in the conversion itself takes no account of whether the value is defined in the enum or not. – Jon Skeet Mar 11 '11 at 17:36
    
I have a use case. The HttpStatusCode enum defined in the framework. I want to check for all values above 400 to handle them in a specific way. – Gilles Apr 28 '14 at 20:44
    
@Melllvar Mono Projects, check the current OS. msdn.microsoft.com/de-de/library/3a8hyw88(v=vs.110).aspx just as example – Brettetete Jan 25 '15 at 17:55

I would go with the 2nd method. To me, it makes more logical sense. It would eliminate runtime exceptions if i2 is out of range.

share|improve this answer
3  
There wouldn't be a runtime exception. Any int (or matched intergral type if the enum base is changed) may be cast to that enum. – Matthew Whited Mar 11 '11 at 17:22
    
This answer implies that there will be an exception if i1 is 10, for example. There won't be. – Jon Skeet Mar 11 '11 at 17:23
2  
@Daniel: It will be a value of type MyEnum with an underlying value of 10. What happens next depends on what you do with it. If you call ToString, it will just return "10" for example. But there won't be an exception. – Jon Skeet Mar 11 '11 at 17:26
3  
I wish it was a runtime exception. – Daniel A. White Mar 11 '11 at 17:27
1  
@Daniel: Sure, I wish that at least there was support for a restricted set of values too, potentially as well as the existing "named number" approach that C# actually takes. – Jon Skeet Mar 11 '11 at 17:37

I would recommend casting the int to the representative enum value when you read it from the database. This will greatly improve the readability of your code.

enum MyEnum
{
    Invalid=0,
    Value1=1,
    Value1=2,
}

MyEnum dbValue = ReadEnumFromDB();
if(dbValue == MyEnum.Invalid)
{
   ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Readability of dbValue==MyEnum.Invalid is same as intDbValue==(int)MyEnum.Invalid – Budda Mar 11 '11 at 18:24
1  
If that database column is always properly represented by a MyEnum value, when debugging it will be easier to recognize just exactly what it is that int is supposed to represent. – Bananamansam Mar 14 '11 at 13:13

Enumerations in .Net are really just pretty meta-structures over the base integral type. (By default that type is int.) If you look at the Generated IL for an enumeration you will find it is really a standard type with several static fields for each of the particular enumeration elements. As such the enum can be cast between integral types transparently.

Related answer

share|improve this answer
2  
Metthes, your message seems like a "comment" to Mellvar's answer, not an answer itself. – Budda Mar 15 '11 at 16:29
    
I guess I could add the "It doesn't matter" that everyone else started off with. But that doesn't change the rest of my statement. – Matthew Whited Mar 15 '11 at 16:39
1  
and linked question has nothing much to do with this question. – nawfal Jun 11 '13 at 9:34

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