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I'm getting a incomplete type error for the 'next' and 'previous' variables. I'm not sure what I am doing wrong because I am very rusty on writing classes in C++. Any help would be appreciated! Thanks.

#include<iostream>

using namespace std;

class LinearNode
{
    public:
        //Constructor for the LinearNode class that takes no arguments 
        LinearNode();
        //Constructor for the LinearNode class that takes the element as an argument
        LinearNode(int el);
        //returns the next node in the set.
        LinearNode getNext();
        //returns the previous node in the set
        LinearNode getPrevious();
        //sets the next element in the set
        void setNext(LinearNode node);
        //sets the previous element in the set
        void setPrevious(LinearNode node);
        //sets the element of the node
        void setElement(int el);
        //gets the element of the node
        int getElement();

    private: 
        LinearNode next;
        LinearNode previous;
        int element;        
};//ends the LinearNode class

Implementation file:

#include<iostream>
#include"LinearNode.h"

using namespace std;

//Constructor for LinearNode, sets next and element to initialized states
LinearNode::LinearNode()
{
    next = NULL;
    element = 0;
}//ends LinearNode default constructor

//Constructor for LinearNode takes an element as argument.
LinearNode::LinearNode(int el)
{
    next = NULL;
    previous = NULL;
    element = 0;
}//ends LinearNode constructor

//returns the next element in the structure
LinearNode::getNext()
{
    return next;
}//ends getNext function

//returns previous element in structure
LinearNode::getPrevious()
{
    return previous;
}//ends getPrevious function

//sets the next variable for the node
LinearNode::setNext(LinearNode node)
{
    next = node
}//ends the setNext function

//sets previous for the node
LinearNode::setPrevious(LinearNode node)
{
    previous = node;
}//ends the setPrevious function

//returns element of the node
LinearNode::getElement()
{
    return element;
}//ends the getelement function

//sets the element of the node
LinearNode::setElement(int el)
{
    element = el;
}//ends the setElement function

test file:

    #include<iostream>
#include"LinearNode.h"

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    LinearNode node1, node2, move;
    node1.setElement(1);
    node2.setElement(2);

    node2.setNext(node1);
    node1.setPrevious(node2);

    move = node2;

    while(move.getNext() != NULL)
        cout << move.getElement() << endl;

}
share|improve this question
1  
Post the entire error message, please. It's very helpful. –  James Mar 11 '11 at 17:22

4 Answers 4

You need to specify the return type for all of your .cpp functions. ex:

    //returns previous element in structure
LinearNode LinearNode::getPrevious()
{
    return previous;
}//ends getPrevious function
share|improve this answer
1  
Well spotted, this is an additional problem. –  André Caron Mar 11 '11 at 17:27

Your members of type LinearNode are instances, which they aren't allowed to be in that context. Remember, in C++, if you declare "Foo f", that's not a reference to a heap object as in C#, but an instance of Foo right there on the stack or in your class layout.

Even worse, those two LinearNode instances would be instantiated when their containing instance is instantiated. And each of them has two child instances which would be likewise instantiated, and each of those has two... And so on, and so on, until you run out of memory. Naturally you're not allowed to do that, because it makes no sense.

So those have to be pointers or references. The reason is that the size of those two instances has to be known for the compiler to determine the size of the LinearNode class, but that size must be known before their size can be known.

share|improve this answer

Your type has a recursive definition, which is prohibited.

class LinearNode
{
private: 
    LinearNode next;
    LinearNode previous;
};

The data members next and previous are instances (not references or pointers) of the LinearNode class, which is not completely defined yet.

You probably want this:

class LinearNode
{
private: 
    LinearNode * next;
    LinearNode * previous;
};
share|improve this answer
    
hurray for learning –  Shredder Mar 11 '11 at 17:29

it would appear that your trying to impliment a "linked list"

The structure of a linked is that next & previous "points" (*) and is not actually another node as Andre states.

http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/pointers/ may help clarify.

class LinearNode
{
//...snip
//returns the next node in the set.
LinearNode* getNext();
//returns the previous node in the set
LinearNode* getPrevious();

//...snip
private: 
    LinearNode * next;
    LinearNode * previous;
};

So in the implementation file:

//returns the next element in the structure
LinearNode* LinearNode::getNext()
{
    return next; // now a poiner
}//ends getNext function

//returns previous element in structure
LinearNode*  LinearNode::getPrevious()
{
    return previous; // now a poiner
}//ends getPrevious function

//sets the next variable for the node
void LinearNode::setNext(LinearNode* node) //pointer in, void out
{
    next = node
}//ends the setNext function

//sets previous for the node
void LinearNode::setPrevious(LinearNode* node)//pointer in, void out
{
    previous = node;
}//ends the setPrevious function

so main looks like:

int main()
{
    LinearNode node1, node2, move;
    node1.setElement(1);
    node2.setElement(2);

    node2.setNext(&node1); // give the address of node to the next pointer (&)
    node1.setPrevious(&node2); // give the address of node to the next pointer (&)

    move = node2;

    while(move.getNext() != NULL)
        cout << move.getElement() << endl;

}

I don't know what the while loop's trying to do though! if - perhaps?

Also as Nicklamort states all your class functions need to have a return type, except in the case of void.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't mean to be rude or anything, but you just re-worded 2 other answers here. Also, your post seems to have a broken link (failed to define it, perhaps?). –  André Caron Mar 11 '11 at 19:06
    
Not rude at all, I was just trying to put all together for tpar - link fixed –  Brandrew Mar 14 '11 at 18:44

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