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I currently have 2 queries that are returning lists of MyModel like this:

var q1 = ....
         select new MyModel()
         {
             TheData1 = ...
             TheData2 = ...
             TheUniqueID = ...
         }

var q2 = ....
         select new MyModel()
         {
             TheData1 = ...
             TheData2 = ...
             TheUniqueID = ...
         }

If in q1 I have:

TheUniqueID = 2,3,6,9,11 

and in q2 I have:

TheUniqueID = 2,4,7,9,12

How do write the query so that I get a list of MyModel where

TheUniqueID = 2,3,4,6,7,9,11,12

In other words, each TheUniqueID is present only once (ie. 2 and 9 not repeated).

I started looking at Union and distinct but I'm wondering if I need 2 from statements or not.

Any suggestions are welcome.

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Is this LINQ to Objects or LINQ to SQL etc? –  Jon Skeet Mar 11 '11 at 17:30
    
it's a linq to sql query –  frenchie Mar 14 '11 at 3:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

I think frenchie wants a list of MyModel back instead of just the TheUniqueID.

You need to create a MyModelTheUniqueIDComparer class and pass a new instance of it as a second argument into Union:

class MyModelTheUniqueIDComparer : IEqualityComparer<MyModel>
{
    public bool Equals(MyModel x, MyModel y)
    {
        return x.TheUniqueID == y.TheUniqueID;
    }

    // If Equals() returns true for a pair of objects 
    // then GetHashCode() must return the same value for these objects.

    public int GetHashCode(MyModel myModel)
    {
        return myModel.TheUniqueID.GetHashCode();
    }
}

Then you can call to get the result:

var result = q1.Union(q2, new MyModelTheUniqueIDComparer());

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb358407.aspx for a more details.

Update:

Try this:

public class A
{
    public string TheData1 { get; set; }
    public string TheData2 { get; set; }
    public string UniqueID { get; set; }
}

public class AComparer : IEqualityComparer<A>
{

    #region IEqualityComparer<A> Members

    public bool Equals(A x, A y)
    {
        return x.UniqueID == y.UniqueID;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(A obj)
    {
        return obj.UniqueID.GetHashCode();
    }

    #endregion
}

And test with this:

var listOfA = new List<A>();
var q1 = from a in listOfA
                 select new A()
             {
                 TheData1 = "TestData",
                 TheData2 = "TestData",
                 UniqueID = a.UniqueID
             };

var anotherListOfA = new List<A>();
var q2 = from a in anotherListOfA
                 select new A()
                 {
                     TheData1 = "TestData",
                     TheData2 = "TestData",
                     UniqueID = a.UniqueID
                 };

q1.Union(q2, new AComparer());

Make sure you have using System.Linq;

share|improve this answer
    
ah! I kind of knew it wasn't going to be something simple! I'm taking a break and I'll be back to try this out in a bit. Thanks for your help. –  frenchie Mar 11 '11 at 17:55
    
I get an unsupported overload used for query operator Union error. I'm trying to cast but it's not working: return result as List<MyModel> or return (List<MyModel>)result doesn't work on the return statement. Any idea why? –  frenchie Mar 11 '11 at 19:13
    
try return q1.Union(q2, new MyModelTheUniqueIDComparer()).ToList(); –  Thomas Li Mar 11 '11 at 19:25
    
Still stuck with this unsupported overload error –  frenchie Mar 11 '11 at 20:49
    
+1, this is also great if you have no unique values in your object, but the combination of the objects is unique - so for example in Equals: return (x.TheData1.equals(y.TheData1)) && (x.TheData2.equals(y.TheData2)) and for GetHashCode: return (obj.TheData1 + obj.TheData2).GetHashCode(). Obviously in this case you wouldn't need that due to UniqueID, but it's useful in other situations where there is no equivalent. –  StormPooper May 10 '13 at 16:22

Union creates an Enumerable with unique values from both collections. In other words, you don't need Distinct.

edit: example of Union here

edit2: forgot that it's not the list of UniqueIDs that you're concatenating. I removed the suggested code since it was wrong. You should be able to do a simple Union if you implement an IEqualityComparer, but that might be overkill.

share|improve this answer

As was pointed out if you are combining the lists with .Union() you will have to define uniqueness by using the overload passing an IEqualityComparer for your type.

var result = q1.Union(q2, myEqualityComparer);

otherwise, and easier you could use DistinctBy( x=> x.TheUniqueId) from the MoreLinq project:

var result = q1.Concat(q2).DistinctBy(c => c.TheUniqueID);
share|improve this answer
    
MoreLinq seems to have become a dead link. Try this instead: code.google.com/p/morelinq –  Mike de Klerk Dec 7 '14 at 6:51

Inefficient single line answer with no IEqualityComparerer

Using MoreLinq source code as inspiration, this will give a unique list:

Short answer (the OrderBy isn't necessary but if not used the answer comes out as 2,3,6,9,11,4,7,12):

var concattedUniqueList = theUniqueIDList1.Concat(theUniqueIDList2)
            .GroupBy(f=>f.UniqueID, f=>f).Select(g => g.First()).OrderBy(f=>f.UniqueID);

Complete answer:

//INPUT
//theUniqueIDList1 = 2,3,6,9,11 
//theUniqueIDList2 = 2,4,7,9,12
//OUTPUT
//2,3,4,6,7,9,11,12
public class MyModel
{
    public string TheData1 { get; set; }
    public string TheData2 { get; set; }
    public int UniqueID { get; set; }
}

public static void GroupByEx1()
    {
        // Create a list of Models.
        List<MyModel> theUniqueIDList1 =
            new List<MyModel>{  new MyModel { TheData1="Barley",    UniqueID=2 },
                                    new MyModel { TheData1="Boots",     UniqueID=3 },
                                    new MyModel { TheData1="Whiskers",  UniqueID=6 },
                                    new MyModel { TheData1="Daisy",     UniqueID=9 },
                                    new MyModel { TheData1="Preti",     UniqueID=11 } };
        List<MyModel> theUniqueIDList2 =
            new List<MyModel>{  new MyModel { TheData1="Barley",    UniqueID=2 },
                                    new MyModel { TheData1="Henry",     UniqueID=4 },
                                    new MyModel { TheData1="Walsh",     UniqueID=7 },
                                    new MyModel { TheData1="Daisy",     UniqueID=9 },
                                    new MyModel { TheData1="Ugly",  UniqueID=12 } };

        var concattedUniqueList = theUniqueIDList1.Concat(theUniqueIDList2)
            .OrderBy(f=>f.UniqueID).GroupBy(f=>f.UniqueID, f=>f).Select(g => g.First());

        foreach (var item in concattedUniqueList)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("UniqueId: {0}({1})", item.UniqueID, item.TheData1);
        }
    }

void Main()
{
    GroupByEx1();               
    //2,3,4,6,7,9,11,12
}

Note: compared to using an IEqualityComparer for speed - 10000 times for each 698 ns for Concat 100 ns for IEqualityComparer

developed in LinqPad

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1  
In my opinion this is the best answer. It's way better than making your own comparer. To be fussy I would do .GroupBy(f=>f.UniqueID, f=>f).SelectMany(g => g.Take(1)); as a way of habitually not calling .First(). It works here, but in other queries calling .First() can lead to issues. But certainly still the best answer. –  Enigmativity Dec 16 '14 at 4:11

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