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I need to document a Java project. I am a C# Programmer and Systems Analyst. But I am new to Java.

I have the directories checked out of SVN.

These directories include the source directories, WEB-INF and other files required for definition of the project, classpath etc.

I understand that the files essentially belong either of the following three categories

  1. Source code files / directories that are based on the way the packages are structured (.Java)
  2. Directories / Files required for project definition, compiler settings etc
  3. Files required for deployment.

The project is (as most Java projects are) an Eclipse based project designed to be hosted on Tomcat.

Now, give the above information I have decided to document the entire project into three different documents

  1. A document explaining the source code etc.
  2. A document explaining the purpose of the files & directories that are required for compiler settings, project definitions etc
  3. A document that explains the deployment directory structure.

Or alternatively I could create a single document with three sections that explain 1-3 above.

Now, questions

  1. Is this the right approach?
  2. Are there any other methodologies that I can follow or borrow from?
  3. Are there any other suggestions etc that you can add to this approach

Any additional info will be of use.

Thanks a ton in advance

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think you're on the right track. In a project you need to address three documentation needs

  1. User Documentation This include a document stating what the application is about, and how to start it/access ut.

  2. Development Documentation This includes at least the Javadocs, a description of the source code directory structure, the build process (ie, how to compile the project), compiler time dependencies, development standards, how to set up a database for development, and how to get the source code from the repository. These are the minimum you need to get others to work in your project. Additionally as the project complexity grows I like to put together a series of "How To" for common tasks in the system (ie: "How to leave an Audit Trail for a given Operation", "How to use the Logging framework", "How to manage exceptions", etc), a description of the main Domain classes and their relationship. If you use a database, and the database schema is not exactly one-on-one with the domain classes, I'll add a schema documentation.

  3. Deployment Documentation This is basically the installation manual of the application, describing any steps needed to make it run: putting the WAR in Tomcat, running scripts against a database, configuration files that needs to be modified, etc,etc.

As you see, you already partially addressed two of them. Start small and simple, and add the rest as the need arises.

It also helps to check if your organization has any documentation standard.

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Very useful and relevant –  Nomad Mar 12 '11 at 6:14
1  
But what is the best way to do this? I'd rather that all my docs (1, 2 and 3) be in same versioning system as my code. Using javadoc for 1 and 3 kind of sucks (or I'm doing it wrong). So what do you use there? –  Mathieu JVL Apr 9 '14 at 14:48

Try Javadocs link. Written with proper planning, it will address all your points above.

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Yes, Javadocs is documentation at the micro level. I am also interested in painting a wider picture of the application... –  Nomad Mar 12 '11 at 6:16

A document explaining the source code etc.

Yes. Approach this as if your reader was someone trying to get familiar with the reasons why the project was written (why was this project created), as well as the overall architecture of the project.

The Javadocs on the source classes should explain what each class does. Your document should tie the Javadocs together, like a tutorial.

A document explaining the purpose of the files & directories that are required for compiler settings, project definitions etc.

Yes.

A document that explains the deployment directory structure.

I suppose that's what your build scripts do. Perhaps I don't understand what you expect this document to accomplish.

Are there any other suggestions etc that you can add to this approach

Unless this is the first time anyone in your development group has documented a Java project, there should be other documentation. See what they've done.

If you are the first, then I'd say this was a good start. I'd be most interested in the first document. Your new programmers would like the second document.

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Very useful and relevant –  Nomad Mar 12 '11 at 6:15

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