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I was asked recently what was the most efficient way to revers an array in Javascript. At the moment I suggested using a for loop and fiddling with the array but then realized there is a native Array.reverse() method.

For curiosity's sake, can anyone help me explore this by showing examples or pointing in the right direction so I can read into this? Any suggestions regarding how to meassure performance would be awesome too.

Thanks!

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I know this is a couple of years later, but of course it still shows up in searches. It turns out the answer you accepted was flawed (see its comments) - Array.reverse() is faster. Since this still shows up in google results, consider accepting Raynos's answer? –  starwed Mar 22 '13 at 20:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Based on this setup:

var array = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9];
var length = array.length;

Array.reverse(); is the first or second slowest!

The benchmarks are here: http://jsperf.com/js-array-reverse-vs-while-loop/5

Across browsers, swap loops are faster. There are two common types of swap algorithms (see Wikipedia), each with two variations.

The two types of swap algorithms are temporary swap and XOR swap.

The two variations handle index calculations differently. The first variation compares the current left index and the right index and then decrements the right index of the array. The second variation compares the current left index and the length divided by half and then recalculates the right index for each iteration.

You may or may not see huge differences between the two variations. For example, in Chrome 18, the first variations of the temporary swap and XOR swap are over 60% slower than the second variations, but in Opera 12, both variations of the temporary swap and XOR swap have similar performance.

Temporary swap:

First variation:

function temporarySwap(array)
{
    var left = null;
    var right = null;
    var length = array.length;
    for (left = 0, right = length - 1; left < right; left += 1, right -= 1)
    {
        var temporary = array[left];
        array[left] = array[right];
        array[right] = temporary;
    }
    return array;
}

Second variation:

function temporarySwapHalf(array)
{
    var left = null;
    var right = null;
    var length = array.length;
    for (left = 0; left < length / 2; left += 1)
    {
        right = length - 1 - left;
        var temporary = array[left];
        array[left] = array[right];
        array[right] = temporary;
    }
    return array;
}

XOR swap:

First variation:

function xorSwap(array)
{
    var i = null;
    var r = null;
    var length = array.length;
    for (i = 0, r = length - 1; i < r; i += 1, r -= 1)
    {
        var left = array[i];
        var right = array[r];
        left ^= right;
        right ^= left;
        left ^= right;
        array[i] = left;
        array[r] = right;
    }
    return array;
}

Second variation:

function xorSwapHalf(array)
{
    var i = null;
    var r = null;
    var length = array.length;
    for (i = 0; i < length / 2; i += 1)
    {
        r = length - 1 - i;
        var left = array[i];
        var right = array[r];
        left ^= right;
        right ^= left;
        left ^= right;
        array[i] = left;
        array[r] = right;
    }
    return array;
}

There is another swap method called destructuring assignment: http://wiki.ecmascript.org/doku.php?id=harmony:destructuring

Destructuring assignment:

First variation:

function destructuringSwap(array)
{
    var left = null;
    var right = null;
    var length = array.length;
    for (left = 0, right = length - 1; left < right; left += 1, right -= 1)
    {
        [array[left], array[right]] = [array[right], array[left]];
    }
    return array;
}

Second variation:

function destructuringSwapHalf(array)
{
    var left = null;
    var right = null;
    var length = array.length;
    for (left = 0; left < length / 2; left += 1)
    {
        right = length - 1 - left;
        [array[left], array[right]] = [array[right], array[left]];
    }
    return array;
}

Right now, an algorithm using destructuring assignment is the slowest of them all. It is even slower than Array.reverse();. However, the algorithms using destructuring assignments and Array.reverse(); methods are the shortest examples, and they look the cleanest. I hope their performance gets better in the future.


Another mention is that modern browsers are improving their performance of array push and splice operations.

In Firefox 10, this for loop algorithm using array push and splice rivals the temporary swap and XOR swap loop algorithms.

for (length -= 2; length > -1; length -= 1)
{
    array.push(array[length]);
    array.splice(length, 1);
}

However, you should probably stick with the swap loop algorithms until many of the other browsers match or exceed their array push and splice performance.

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3  
I think it should be noted all the functions above, except for the temporary swap, only work on integer arrays and not arrays with other types (strings, objects, etc). –  DisgruntledGoat Feb 24 '13 at 22:22
4  
Your benchmark's "for push then slice" test clobbers the global length, making all the tests after it meaningless. –  Boris Zbarsky Mar 16 '13 at 21:05
4  
Boris is right: jsperf.com/js-array-reverse-vs-while-loop/9. Furthermore, in Google Chrome array.reverse is faster than the other methods –  Ivan Castellanos Mar 21 '13 at 9:12

Native methods are always faster.

So use Array.reverse where possible. Otherwise an implementation that runs in O(1) would be best ;)

Otherwise just use something like this

var reverse = function(arr) {
   var result = [],
       ii = arr.length;
   for (var i = ii - 1;i !== 0;i--) {
       result.push(arr[i]);
   }
   return result;
}

Benchmark!

Interesting the loop is faster if you use all three stages of the for construct instead of only one.

for(var i = ii - 1; i !== 0;i--) is faster then var i = ii - 1;for(;i-- !== 0;)

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jsperf.com/js-array-reverse-vs-while-loop –  user1385191 Mar 11 '11 at 19:20
1  
@Matt McDonald Interesting, we just did a project in college proving otherwise lol. Although we tested all sorts of functionality like bubble-sort, heap-sort, quick-sort. The timing on stuff like this has a lot to do with how the array is already layed out. (Is it already sorted, is it already random?) Different types of sorts / reverse sorts often depend on the initial state of the array. It is hard to PROVE which is fastest as their are many many different scenarios. –  clamchoda Mar 16 '11 at 21:46
    
Improve your algorithm, and try again. Now, Array.reverse(); is the first or second slowest! –  XP1 Feb 2 '12 at 13:29
2  
In Javascript, native methods are almost always slower because the design of the language is fundamentally broken. See bind vs. closure; for loop versus map; for versus .forEach. This is because the builtins cannot make the assumptions about the array that you can, and so must perform significantly more tests. If you are concerned about performance, consider doing your own loops or lodash; use native methods for readability. –  Brian M. Hunt Feb 23 at 21:07
1  
@Raynos Your example is broken; it doesn't iterate the entire array. It should read var i = ii - 1;i >= 0;i--. –  mcNux May 16 at 12:41

I opened a Firefox bug about slow reverse performance in Firefox. Someone from Mozilla looked at the benchmark used in the accepted post, and says that it is pretty misleading -- in their analysis the native method is better in general for reversing arrays. (As it should be!)

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2  
People need to read through the whole bug case if they're interested in this topic. There seems to be more to it since you posted your answer, but I think for sure I'd stick with native Array.reverse(). –  CWSpear Jul 20 '13 at 5:59

Here's a java example http://www.leepoint.net/notes-java/data/arrays/arrays-ex-reverse.html showing how to reverse an array. Very easy to convert to javascript.

I would suggest using something that simply captures the time before the function is called, and after the function is called. Which ever takes the least time / clock cycles will be the fastest.

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Swap functions are the fastest. Here's a reverse function I wrote that is only slightly similar to the swap functions mentioned above but performs faster.

function reverse(array) {
  var first = null;
  var last = null;
  var tmp = null;
  var length = array.length;

  for (first = 0, last = length - 1; first < length / 2; first++, last--) {
    tmp = array[first];
    array[first] = array[last];
    array[last] = tmp;
  }
}

You can find the benchmarking here http://jsperf.com/js-array-reverse-vs-while-loop/19

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