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My first (and really horrible post) is below.

I try to do a complete example what I want to get. I hope this will be left explained a bit better.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<Boy> boys = new List<Boy>();
            boys.Add(new Boy("Jhon", 7));
            boys.Add(new Boy("Oscar", 6));
            boys.Add(new Boy("Oscar", 7));
            boys.Add(new Boy("Peter", 5));
            ClassRoom myClass = new ClassRoom(boys);

            Console.WriteLine(myClass.ByName("Oscar").Count);  // Prints 2
            Console.WriteLine(myClass.ByYearsOld(7).Count);  // Prints 2

            // This has errors...................
            // But this is as I would like to call my BySomeConditions method....
            Console.WriteLine(  // It should print 1
                                myClass.BySomeConditions([myClass.ByName("Oscar"),
                                                          myClass.ByYearsOld(7)]
                                                        )
                             );
            Console.ReadKey();
        }





        class ClassRoom
        {
            private List<Boy> students;

            public ClassRoom(List<Boy> students)
            {
                this.students = students;
            }

            public List<Boy> ByName(string name)
            {
                return students.FindAll(x => x.Name == name);
            }
            public List<Boy> ByYearsOld(int yearsOld)
            {
                return students.FindAll(x => x.YearsOld == yearsOld);
            }

            // This has ERRORS.......................
            public List<Boy> BySomeConditions(params Func<X, List<Boy>>[] conditions)
            {
                IEnumerable<Boy> result = students;                
                foreach (var condition in conditions) {
                    // I want it ONLY be called with existent functions (ByName and/or ByYearsOld)
                    result = result.Intersect(condition(this));  
                }
            }
        }


        class Boy
        {
            public string Name { get; set; }
            public int YearsOld { get; set; }
            public Boy(string name, int yearsOld)
            {
                Name = name;
                YearsOld = yearsOld;
            }
        }
    }
}

============== first post ===================== Hello,

I have a class with methods:

public class X
{
    private readonly List<string> myList;

    public X(List<string> paramList) // string is really an object
    {
         myList = paramList;
    }

    // Now I want this...
    public List<string> CheckConditions(params Func<T, List<string>>[] conditions)
    {
         var result = myList;
         foreach (Func<T, List<string>> condition in conditions)
         {
               result = result.Intersect(condition(T));
         }
    }

    public List<string> check1(string S)
    {
         return myList.FindAll(x => x.FieldS == S);
    }
    public List<string> check1(int I)
    {
         return myList.FindAll(x => x.FieldI == I);
    }
}

Sorry if there is some error, I have written from scrach to avoid complex real case.

What I want is call my methods like this:

   X.check1("Jhon");

or

   X.check2(12);

or (this is the goal of my question):

   X.CheckConditions(X.check1("Jhon"), X.chek2(12));

Thanks and sorry by my poor example...

share|improve this question
    
Maybe its just me, but I can't make a lot of sense out of your question. X.check1("John") is of type List<string>, not Func<T, List<string>>. What exactly are you trying to achieve? –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 11 '11 at 20:45

5 Answers 5

You need to change the method signature of CheckConditions, it's accepting a variable number of List<string>, not functions.

public List<string> CheckConditions(params List<string>[] lists)

The return type of check1 is List<string>, so that needs to be the type of the parameter that CheckConditions accepts.

share|improve this answer

It is unclear where your T comes from.

Does this meet your requirements?

public class X<T>
{
  private List<T> myList;

  public List<T> CheckConditions(params Func<T, bool>[] conditions)
  {
    IEnumerable<T> query = myList;
    foreach (Func<T, bool> condition in conditions)
    {
      query = query.Where(condition);
    }
    return query.ToList();
  }
}

Then later:

List<T> result = X.CheckConditions(
  z => z.FieldS == "Jhon",
  z => z.FieldI == 12
);
share|improve this answer

There's no reason to make it generic, you know that you want to operate on the current instance of X (so pass in this, instead of the T type parameter). You need to cleanup a few things to to get it to compile (return result and make the type of result and the Intersect call compatible). You can define it like this:

public List<string> CheckConditions(params Func<X, List<string>>[] conditions)
{
     IEnumerable<string> result = myList;
     foreach (var condition in conditions)
     {
           result = result.Intersect(condition(this));
     }

     return result.ToList();
}

Ant then call it like this:

xInstance.CheckConditions(x => x.check1("JHon"), x => x.check1(12));

All that said, I'm not sure why you wouldn't just pass around the results of these functions, instead of passing the actual functions around:

public List<string> CheckConditions(params List<string>[] conditions)
{
     IEnumerable<string> result = myList;
     foreach (var condition in conditions)
     {
           result = result.Intersect(condition);
     }

     return result.ToList();
}

Then call it as in your example, rather than passing in lambda expressions.

share|improve this answer
    
I Will try to clarify editing my question.... –  ferpega Mar 12 '11 at 0:08

you could rewrite you function to look like this:

// Now I want this...
    public List<string> CheckConditions(params Func<T, List<string>>[] conditions)
    {
         var result = myList;
         foreach (Func<T, List<string>> condition in conditions)
         {
               result = result.Intersect(condition(T));
         }
    }

your call would then be X.CheckConditions(()=>X.check1("Jhon"), ()=>X.chek2(12));

and you need to provide an instance for x (since the methods are instance methods and not static methods)

In your example you pass T as an argument to the functor but T is a type argument som it can't be passed as an argument to the method. Did you mean to pass a value?

This begs for a clarification of why you would want to do this. Maybe if you provided details on what you are trying to accomplish (as opposed to how) then you could get a better solution to your problem.

share|improve this answer

What you pass to your

X.CheckConditions

is not a reference to the functions, but the returned value of their invocation.

Now, if you pass function reference - it does not come with parameters, unless you construct and pass a data-structure that will contain the function reference and the arguments it should work on.

In this case - generics is not the solution. You should consider another pattern to follow, like command pattern or strategy pattern, where you pass to your CheckConstruction instances of checker-objects, each is instantiated with the parameters it should work on, and either implements or is provided by the validation function.

share|improve this answer
1  
you don't need to construct a structure it can be achieved with a Lambda expression as well –  Rune FS Mar 11 '11 at 20:48
    
Yea (I vote you up:) ), then in that case - you need to pass function references each from a different closure. It's just a matter of implementation for the same idea ;) –  Radagast the Brown Mar 11 '11 at 21:21

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