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Is there a way to create a 128 bit object in java, that can be bit manipulated the same way as a long or int? I want to do 32 bit shifts and i want to be able to do a bit OR operation on the whole 128 bit structure.

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7 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here, I present to you... an old idea. Now it's awfully downgraded (no code enhancer, no nothing) to simple 128 bit thingie that should be super fast, though. What I truly want is a ByteBuffer based array of C alike Struct but fully usable in java.

The main idea is allocating more than a single object at a time and using a pointer to the array. Thus, it greatly conserves memory and the memory is allocated in continuous area, so less cache misses (always good).

I did some moderate testing (but the code is still untested). It does allow basic operations like add, xor, or, set/get with 128 bit numbers. The standard rule: less documentation than expected applied unfortunately. Adding extra code for extra operations should be straight forward.

Here is the code, look at main method for some usage. Cheers!

package bestsss.util;

import java.util.Random;

public class Bitz {
    final int[] array;
    private Bitz(int n){
        array=new int[n<<2];
    }

    public int size(){
        return size(this.array);
    }

    private static int size(int[] array){
        return array.length>>2;
    }
    /**
     * allocates N 128bit elements. newIdx to create a pointer
     * @param n
     * @return
     */
    public static Bitz allocate(int n){
        return new Bitz(n);
    }
    /**
     * Main utility class - points to an index in the array
     * @param idx
     * @return
     */
    public Idx newIdx(int idx){     
        return new Idx(array).set(idx);
    }

    public static class Idx{
        private static final  long mask = 0xFFFFFFFFL;
        //dont make the field finals

        int idx;
        int[] array;//keep ref. here, reduce the indirection

        Idx(int[] array){
            this.array=array;
        }

        public Idx set(int idx) {
            if (Bitz.size(array)<=idx || idx<0)
                throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException(String.valueOf(idx));

            this.idx = idx<<2;
            return this;
        }

        public int index(){
            return idx>>2;
        }

        public Idx shl32(){
            final int[] array=this.array;
            int idx = this.idx;

            array[idx]=array[++idx];
            array[idx]=array[++idx];
            array[idx]=array[++idx];                 
            array[idx]=0;

            return this;
        }

        public Idx shr32(){
            final int[] array=this.array;
            int idx = this.idx+3;

            array[idx]=array[--idx];
            array[idx]=array[--idx];
            array[idx]=array[--idx];                 
            array[idx]=0;
            return this;
        }
        public Idx or(Idx src){         
            final int[] array=this.array;
            int idx = this.idx;

            int idx2 = src.idx;
            final int[] array2=src.array;

            array[idx++]|=array2[idx2++];
            array[idx++]|=array2[idx2++];
            array[idx++]|=array2[idx2++];
            array[idx++]|=array2[idx2++];

            return this;            
        }

        public Idx xor(Idx src){            
            final int[] array=this.array;
            int idx = this.idx;

            int idx2 = src.idx;
            final int[] array2=src.array;

            array[idx++]^=array2[idx2++];
            array[idx++]^=array2[idx2++];
            array[idx++]^=array2[idx2++];
            array[idx++]^=array2[idx2++];

            return this;            
        }

        public Idx add(Idx src){            
            final int[] array=this.array;
            int idx = this.idx+3;

            final int[] array2=src.array;
            int idx2 = src.idx+3;


            long l =0;

            l += array[idx]&mask;
            l += array2[idx2--]&mask;           
            array[idx--]=(int)(l&mask);
            l>>>=32;


            l += array[idx]&mask;
            l += array2[idx2--]&mask;           
            array[idx--]=(int)(l&mask);
            l>>>=32;

            l += array[idx]&mask;
            l += array2[idx2--]&mask;           
            array[idx--]=(int)(l&mask);
            l>>>=32;

            l += array[idx]&mask;
            l += array2[idx2--];            
            array[idx]=(int)(l&mask);
//          l>>>=32;

            return this;            
        }

        public Idx set(long high, long low){
            final int[] array=this.array;
            int idx = this.idx;
            array[idx+0]=(int) ((high>>>32)&mask);
            array[idx+1]=(int) ((high>>>0)&mask);


            array[idx+2]=(int) ((low>>>32)&mask);
            array[idx+3]=(int) ((low>>>0)&mask);
            return this;
        }


        public long high(){
            final int[] array=this.array;
            int idx = this.idx;
            long res = (array[idx]&mask)<<32 | (array[idx+1]&mask); 
            return res;
        }

        public long low(){
            final int[] array=this.array;
            int idx = this.idx;
            long res = (array[idx+2]&mask)<<32 | (array[idx+3]&mask); 
            return res;
        }

        //ineffective but well
        public String toString(){                   
            return String.format("%016x-%016x", high(), low());
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Bitz bitz = Bitz.allocate(256);
        Bitz.Idx idx = bitz.newIdx(0);
        Bitz.Idx idx2 = bitz.newIdx(2);

        System.out.println(idx.set(0, 0xf));
        System.out.println(idx2.set(0, Long.MIN_VALUE).xor(idx));       

        System.out.println(idx.set(0, Long.MAX_VALUE).add(idx2.set(0, 1)));
        System.out.println("==");
        System.out.println(idx.add(idx));//can add itself

        System.out.println(idx.shl32());//left
        System.out.println(idx.shr32());//and right
        System.out.println(idx.shl32());//back left

        //w/ alloc
        System.out.println(idx.add(bitz.newIdx(4).set(0, Long.MAX_VALUE)));

        //self xor
        System.out.println(idx.xor(idx));
        //random xor

        System.out.println("===init random===");
        Random r = new Random(1112); 
        for (int i=0, s=bitz.size(); i<s; i++){
            idx.set(i).set(r.nextLong(), r.nextLong());
            System.out.println(idx);
        }
        Idx theXor = bitz.newIdx(0);
        for (int i=1, s=bitz.size(); i<s; i++){         
            theXor.xor(idx.set(i));
        }

        System.out.println("===XOR===");
        System.out.println(theXor);
    }
}
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Three possibilities have been identified:

  • The BitSet class provides some of the operations that you need, but no "shift" method. To implement this missing method, you'd need to do something like this:

    BitSet bits = new BitSet(128);
    ...
    // shift left by 32bits
    for (int i = 0; i < 96; i++) {
        bits.set(i, bits.get(i + 32));
    }
    bits.set(96, 127, false);
    
  • The BigInteger class provides all of the methods (more or less), but since BigInteger is immutable, it could result in an excessive object creation rate ... depending on how you use the bitsets. (There is also the issue that shiftLeft(32) won't chop off the leftmost bits ... but you can deal with this by using and to mask out the bits at index 128 and higher.)

  • If performance is your key concern, implementing a custom class with 4 int or 2 long fields will probably give best performance. (Which is actually the faster option of the two will depend on the hardware platform, the JVM, etc. I'd probably choose the long version because it will be simpler to code ... and only try to optimize further if profiling indicated that it was a potentially worthwhile activity.)

    Furthermore, you can design the APIs to behave exactly as you require (modulo the constraints of Java language). The downside is that you have to implement and test everything, and you will be hard-wiring the magic number 128 into your code-base.

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longs always better even on 32bit (mmx reg can be used to perform single load) –  bestsss Mar 12 '11 at 0:17
    
@bestsss you are assuming an x86 / x86-64 architecture. –  Stephen C Mar 12 '11 at 7:13
    
@Stephan, x86, x64 has its native 64 registers, but even 'small' processors XScale, ARMv7 have 64bit registers to handle the load in a single instruction. Certainly, "always" is too freely used since not all CPUs would have usable 64bit load instructions. –  bestsss Mar 12 '11 at 9:44
    
@bestsss - I'm aware of that, but choosing int versus long here based on suppositions about which is faster is (really) premature optimization. –  Stephen C Mar 13 '11 at 2:53
    
it's about bits, can't get more granular than that. I don't consider it premature optimization mostly b/c it's what my instinct tells me. An impl, w/ longs is also simpler and shorter {i know i've showed int[] based, just want to do it w/ ints}. If I care about performance I'd just GDB into the code to make sure the results are what's to be expected. Besides, depending on the impl. and align 4 ints (non-array) can possibly take more memory than 2 longs. –  bestsss Mar 13 '11 at 20:58
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There is no longer data type than long (I have logged this as an RFE along with a 128 bit floating point ;)

You can create an object with four 32-bit int values and support these operations fairly easily.

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No.

Sorry there isn't a better answer.

One approach may be to create a wrapper object for two long values and implement the required functionality while taking signedness of the relevant operators into account. There is also BigInteger [updated from rlibby's answer], but it doesn't provide the required support.

Happy coding.

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this was the approach i was considering as well –  richs Mar 11 '11 at 22:44
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You can't define any new types to which you could apply Java's built-in bitwise operators.

However, could you just use java.math.BigInteger? BigInteger defines all of the bit-wise operations that are defined for integral types (as methods). This includes, for example, BigInteger.or(BigInteger).

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Perhaps BitSet would be useful to you.

It has the logical operations, and I imagine shifting wouldn't be all that hard to implement given their utility methods.

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Actually, implementing shift efficiently using the BitSet API would be tricky. –  Stephen C Mar 11 '11 at 23:32
    
@Stephen That's true. –  corsiKa Mar 11 '11 at 23:48
    
@Stephen - oddly enough, right shift is already implemented, see BitSet.get(int,int). for some reason, though, they neglected left shift. –  jtahlborn Mar 12 '11 at 1:11
    
@jtahlborn, the method is quite expensive, though, it allocates a new BitSet and it's not very efficient. –  bestsss Mar 12 '11 at 1:54
    
@bestsss - agreed. it's functional, but not ideal. i don't know why they didn't implement BitSet more completely. –  jtahlborn Mar 12 '11 at 3:36
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Afaik, the JVM will just convert whatever you code into 32 bit chunks whatever you do. JVM is 32 bit. I think even 64 bit version of JVM largely processes in 32 bit chunks. It certainly should to conserve memory... You're just going to slow down your code as the JIT tries to optimise the mess you create. In C/C++ etc. there's no point doing this either as you will still have impedance from the fact that it's 32 or 64 bit registers in the hardware you're most likely using. Even the Intel Xenon Phi (has 512bit vector registers) is just bunches of 32 and 64 bit elements.

If you want to implement something like that, you could try to do it in GLSL or OpenCL if you have GPU hardware available. In 2015 Java Sumatra will be released as part of Java 9, at least that's the plan. Then you will have the ability to integrate java with GPU code out of the box. That IS a big deal, hence the illustrious name!

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