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I hardly know how to state this question, let alone search for answers. But here's my best shot. Assume I have a table

Col1   Col2
-----+-----
 A   | 1
 A   | 2
 A   | 3
 A   | 4
 B   | 1
 B   | 2
 B   | 3
 C   | 1
 C   | 2
 C   | 3
 D   | 1

I want to find the subset of associations (rows) where:

  1. There are no duplicates in Col1
  2. There are no duplicates in Col2
  3. Every value in Col1 is associated with a value in Col2

So the above example could yield this result

Col1   Col2
-----+-----
 A   | 4
 B   | 2
 C   | 3
 D   | 1

Notice that A-4 must be in the result because there are 4 unique letters and unique 4 numbers, so if you don't associate A to 4, there's no subset remaining that doesn't map every value in Col1 while retaining the uniqueness of Col2.

Also, notice that it would be equally valid to replace B-2 and C-3 with B-3 and C-2. I don't care which subset is selected, but I want one that fulfills all the requirements.

Not every set of data will have a sub-set that fulfills all the requirements, but I want to get as close as possible.

I'm trying to do this with a SQL query. I had a query that seemed to accomplish this for one set of data, but then I had to rewrite it for a slightly different set (where Col2 is actually a pair of columns) and could not reproduce my earlier success. My first solution used Min() and Group By and a couple Joins on aggregated results to mark duplicates for elimination in a loop until there was nothing left to safely eliminate. My more recent solution replaces the Group By queries with ROW_NUMBER() expressions that use PARTITION_BY. But I can't figure out how to handle the cases where there are multiple valid result sets from multiply-cross-linked pairs like B and C in the above example. My earlier query might have handled it, but I can't quite comprehend what I did (must have had a good day when I wrote that one). Perhaps I need to do a JOIN on the ROW_NUMBER expressions in my sub-queries? My brain gave out for today. I hope someone can help me find an ingeniously simple solution.

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In my opinion, the biggest challenge would be to teach the DB engine how to pick only one correct combination out of many possible. –  Andriy M Mar 12 '11 at 7:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems to me that you're aiming for something that SQL is not strong enough for. This is a non-standard algorithmic task, and I think you need a real programming language to achieve it. Your task reminds me of chess riddles.

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Perhaps I got lucky with the data I was working with earlier then. I had an SQL query that got very close if not perfect results. I would really like an SQL query that gets close because this query will be executed manually and adjusted as necessary if it's not perfect. If there's a solution that works in most cases to yield mostly correct results, that might be good enough. –  BlueMonkMN Mar 12 '11 at 0:25
    
I think the data may have been (and may still be) sorted for the most part. In other words, once you associate A with 1, you can assume that nothing less than or equal to A nor nothing less than or equal to 1 will need to be considered any more. Not sure if that makes sense. –  BlueMonkMN Mar 12 '11 at 0:28

The problem is equivalent to finding a maximum matching in a bipartite graph. Each column element represents a vertex, each row represents an edge. The linked Wikipedia article provides some pointers to algorithms for solving this problem. There is an implementation of the Hungarian algorithm in Google's or-tools library.

Here's the given example formulated as a graph, with the red edges representing the given solution:

graph

It would be surprising to me if you could find a solution purely in SQL.

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Are you aware of any shortcomings in the solution I found below? Basically, eliminate all the pairs where the number of duplicates in Col1 so exceed the number of duplicates in Col2 for each value in columns 1 and 2, then eliminate all the pairs where the number of duplicates in Col2 exceed that of Col1. Then number each duplicate in Col1 and Col2 and keep only those where the indices match. –  BlueMonkMN Mar 12 '11 at 14:23
    
Also, thanks for at least helping my to put a name to this type of problem. –  BlueMonkMN Mar 12 '11 at 14:47
    
@BlueMonkMN: I am unable to understand your method. –  mhum Mar 13 '11 at 0:43

Try this query, its not great for huge dataset but does what you want, if there is a value in col1 for which it cannot find a unique col2 it would put 0 which is hardcoded, change it to any value to indicate absense of a unique value. I used table named testing (col1, col2) replace your table name in the place of testing.

This is a greedy algorithm which would try to maximize the chance of associating a value in Col1 to all values of Col2. Steps are as follows.

  1. Retrieve Col1 based on the number of Col2 values it is associated in ascending order.
  2. Start with the Col1 which has minimal number of Col2 and associate the value (Start with D as only one value is associated).
  3. Go to next unassociated value (B or C since they have 3 values, associate any of the value which is not in the list of already associated value, 1 is associated with D so 2 or 3 ).
  4. Repeat step 3 for all values in the list selected in step 1.

List item

Following code implements this algo, and its not optimal implementation.

DECLARE @COUNTER    INT = 1
DECLARE @MAX        INT = 0  
DECLARE @COL2       CHAR(1) = NULL

DECLARE @TEMPTABLE TABLE
(
    ROWNUM  INT     IDENTITY(1,1)
    ,COL1   CHAR(1)
    ,COL2   INT
)

INSERT INTO @TEMPTABLE
SELECT COL1, 0
FROM    testing
GROUP BY COL1
ORDER BY COUNT(COL2)

SELECT @MAX = MAX(ROWNUM) FROM @TEMPTABLE

WHILE (  @COUNTER <= @MAX )
BEGIN
        UPDATE @TEMPTABLE 
        SET COL2 = T.COL2
        FROM TESTING T
        INNER JOIN @TEMPTABLE TT
        ON  T.COL1 = TT.COL1
        WHERE T.COL2 NOT IN (SELECT DISTINCT COL2 FROM @TEMPTABLE)
        AND TT.ROWNUM = @COUNTER
        SET @COUNTER = @COUNTER + 1
END

SELECT COL1, COL2 FROM @TEMPTABLE
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Do you know how this compares to the idea in my answer, regarding performance and/or reliability? These algorithms are straining my brain -- I haven't exercised it enough lately! –  BlueMonkMN Mar 12 '11 at 14:36
    
I'm not sure, you'd have to implement your idea and then compare and analyze each solution in whatever ity is important for you. –  Sanjeevakumar Hiremath Mar 12 '11 at 16:27
    
In that case, it may be a few weeks or months before I can accept an answer. But meanwhile you have a point for helpfulness in providing a functional alternative. –  BlueMonkMN Mar 13 '11 at 12:53
    
I'd like you to solve your problem well and then decide on accepting any answer. Accepting an answer is just an acknowledgement, nothing more. Probably if you provide comments/edits/your answers after analyzing it would help the entire community. –  Sanjeevakumar Hiremath Mar 13 '11 at 13:13

This seems to do the trick (I will review the other answers and compare after posting):

CREATE TABLE Trial(Col1 nvarchar(5) not null, Col2 int not null, Eliminated bit not null)

INSERT INTO Trial(Col1, Col2, Eliminated) VALUES('A', 1, 0)
INSERT INTO Trial(Col1, Col2, Eliminated) VALUES('A', 2, 0)
INSERT INTO Trial(Col1, Col2, Eliminated) VALUES('A', 3, 0)
INSERT INTO Trial(Col1, Col2, Eliminated) VALUES('A', 4, 0)
INSERT INTO Trial(Col1, Col2, Eliminated) VALUES('B', 1, 0)
INSERT INTO Trial(Col1, Col2, Eliminated) VALUES('B', 2, 0)
INSERT INTO Trial(Col1, Col2, Eliminated) VALUES('B', 3, 0)
INSERT INTO Trial(Col1, Col2, Eliminated) VALUES('C', 1, 0)
INSERT INTO Trial(Col1, Col2, Eliminated) VALUES('C', 2, 0)
INSERT INTO Trial(Col1, Col2, Eliminated) VALUES('C', 3, 0)
INSERT INTO Trial(Col1, Col2, Eliminated) VALUES('D', 1, 0)

UPDATE T0 SET Eliminated = 1
FROM Trial T0
JOIN (
   SELECT Col1, COUNT(*) Dups
   FROM Trial
   WHERE Eliminated = 0
   GROUP BY Col1) T1
   ON T0.Col1 = T1.Col1
JOIN (
   SELECT Col2, COUNT(*) Dups
   FROM Trial
   WHERE Eliminated = 0
   GROUP BY Col2) T2
   ON T2.Col2 = T0.Col2
WHERE T2.Dups > T1.Dups AND T1.Dups > 1

UPDATE T0 SET Eliminated = 1
FROM Trial T0
JOIN (
   SELECT Col1, COUNT(*) Dups
   FROM Trial
   WHERE Eliminated = 0
   GROUP BY Col1) T1
   ON T0.Col1 = T1.Col1
JOIN (
   SELECT Col2, COUNT(*) Dups
   FROM Trial
   WHERE Eliminated = 0
   GROUP BY Col2) T2
   ON T2.Col2 = T0.Col2
WHERE T1.Dups > T2.Dups AND T2.Dups > 1

UPDATE T0 SET Eliminated = 1
FROM Trial T0
JOIN (
   SELECT Col1, Col2, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Col1 ORDER BY Col2) Dup
   FROM Trial
   WHERE Eliminated = 0) T1 ON T1.Col1 = T0.Col1 AND T1.Col2 = T0.Col2
JOIN (
   SELECT Col1, Col2, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Col2 ORDER BY Col1) Dup
   FROM Trial
   WHERE Eliminated = 0) T2 ON T2.Col1 = T0.Col1 AND T2.Col2 = T0.Col2
WHERE T1.Dup <> T2.Dup

It may not be perfect, but seems to work on my data.

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Actually, as it turns out, my data is set up such that the first two queries do nothing, and everything is handled by the last one. –  BlueMonkMN Mar 12 '11 at 14:37

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