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I am attempting to use the XSL translate() function to create something like a search and replace function as follows:

<xsl:template name="create-id">
    <xsl:param name="id" />
    <xsl:call-template name="search-and-replace">
        <xsl:with-param name="str" select="$id" />
        <xsl:with-param name="search">0123456789</xsl:with-param>
        <xsl:with-param name="replace">abcdefghij</xsl:with-param>
    </xsl:call-template>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template name="search-and-replace">
    <xsl:param name="str" />
    <xsl:param name="search" />
    <xsl:param name="replace" />
    <xsl:variable name="newstr" select="translate($str, $search,
    $replace)" />
    <xsl:choose>
        <xsl:when test="contains($newstr, $search)">
            <xsl:call-template name="search-and-replace">
                <xsl:with-param name="str" select="$newstr" />
                <xsl:with-param name="search" select="$search" />
                <xsl:with-param name="replace" select="$replace" />
            </xsl:call-template>
        </xsl:when>
        <xsl:otherwise>
            <xsl:value-of select="$newstr" />
        </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>

However, something about my logic is wrong here as it appears to be stripping off the last character in the returned string. My guess is that translate() is only replacing the first instance of each character in the string and is not truly recursive.

Any thoughts or input would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
Post some examples of input and output you are seeing, along with what you expect to see. Translate() may not do what you think it does, but without an example we can't tell what that is. – Jim Garrison Mar 12 '11 at 3:27
2  
translate() doesn't do what you think. It's not a good idea to make guesses about what a function does by looking at its name: read the spec first. – Michael Kay Mar 12 '11 at 9:32
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for a complete XSLT 1.0 solution to the multiple-replace problem. Extensive explanation is provided, too. – Dimitre Novatchev Mar 12 '11 at 16:31
up vote 6 down vote accepted

The translate() function can only replace a single character with another single character (or with the empty character (delete)). Thus it cannot solve the problem of string replacement.

Here is a complete XSLT 1.0 solution to the multiple-replace problem:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:my="my:my">
    <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes"/>
    <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

    <my:params xml:space="preserve">
        <pattern>
            <old>&#xA;</old>
            <new><br/></new>
        </pattern>
        <pattern>
            <old>quick</old>
            <new>slow</new>
        </pattern>
        <pattern>
            <old>fox</old>
            <new>elephant</new>
        </pattern>
        <pattern>
            <old>brown</old>
            <new>white</new>
        </pattern>
    </my:params>

    <xsl:variable name="vPats"
         select="document('')/*/my:params/*"/>

    <xsl:template match="text()" name="multiReplace">
        <xsl:param name="pText" select="."/>
        <xsl:param name="pPatterns" select="$vPats"/>

        <xsl:if test="string-length($pText) >0">
            <xsl:variable name="vPat" select=
            "$vPats[starts-with($pText, old)][1]"/>

            <xsl:choose>
                <xsl:when test="not($vPat)">
                    <xsl:copy-of select="substring($pText,1,1)"/>
                </xsl:when>
                <xsl:otherwise>
                    <xsl:copy-of select="$vPat/new/node()"/>
                </xsl:otherwise>
            </xsl:choose>

            <xsl:call-template name="multiReplace">
                <xsl:with-param name="pText" select=
                "substring($pText, 1 + not($vPat) + string-length($vPat/old/node()))"/>
            </xsl:call-template>
        </xsl:if>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when this transformation is applied on the following XML document:

<t>The quick
brown fox</t>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

The slow<br />white elephant

Explanation:

  1. A named template that calls itself recursively is used.

  2. All multiple replacement pattern --> replacement pairs are provided in a single external parameter, which for convenience here is specified inline as the global-level element <my:params> .

  3. The recursion takes every single character in the source string (from left to right) and finds the first pattern that starts with this character at this position in the string.

  4. The replacement can be not only a string but also any node. In this specific case we are replacing every NL character with a <br/> element.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the input and explanation. I will see if this solution will work in my case. – John Mar 14 '11 at 16:39
    
@John: You are welcome. – Dimitre Novatchev Mar 14 '11 at 17:41
    
@dimitre-novatchev, it looks like this is going to work for me. However, I need to have at least two sets of parameters define for the given stylesheet. As my experience working with XSL namespaces is somewhat limited, how would one modify your code to pass define and pass in two different sets of parameters to the multiReplace call? – John Mar 14 '11 at 19:41
    
@John: The <my:params> tree should be passed as a parameter, or it could be in a separate XML file and the name of the file should be passed as a parameter to the transformation. Now, passing external parameters to the transformation depends on the particular XSLT processor being used -- one needs to read its documentation. I thing that your best route is to accept this answer and then ask an additional question, specifying the XSLT processor you are using and asking how external parameters should be passed for this XSLT processor. I or many others can give good answers. – Dimitre Novatchev Mar 14 '11 at 19:57

The definition of the translate($arg, $mapString, $transString) function is:

Returns the value of $arg modified so that every character in the value of $arg that occurs at some position N in the value of $mapString has been replaced by the character that occurs at position N in the value of $transString.

That is, it does not replace a substring with another string, but rather maps characters to other characters. For substring replacement, use something like

<xsl:template name="search-and-replace">
  <xsl:param name="str"/>
  <xsl:param name="search"/>
  <xsl:param name="replace"/>
  <xsl:choose>
    <xsl:when test="contains($str, $search)">
      <xsl:value-of select="substring-before($str, $search)"/>
      <xsl:value-of select="$replace"/>
      <xsl:call-template name="search-and-replace">
        <xsl:with-param name="str" select="substring-after($str, $search)"/>
        <xsl:with-param name="search" select="$search"/>
        <xsl:with-param name="replace" select="$replace"/>
      </xsl:call-template>
    </xsl:when>
    <xsl:otherwise>
      <xsl:value-of select="$str"/>
    </xsl:otherwise>
  </xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>
share|improve this answer
    
I am actually looking for more of a multiple instance character mapping in a string, than a search and replace. I'm sorry if my original post was unclear. – John Mar 14 '11 at 16:43

Seems like your will never be true as you have already replaced every characters in $search to $replace in

<xsl:variable name="newstr" select="translate($str, $search,
    $replace)" />

beforehand.

share|improve this answer

str:replace from exslt. It does exactly what you want, and is already written and testing by some xslt gurus. The xslt source is also available there.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I am not sure our system will support exslt, but I will look into it. – John Mar 14 '11 at 16:42
    
The provided xsd should still work, since it does not use anything special. – earlNameless Mar 14 '11 at 21:36

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