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I apologize in advance for my long-winded question and if the formatting isn't up to par (newbie), here goes.

I have a table MY_TABLE with the following schema -

 MY_ID | TYPE | REC_COUNT
 1     | A    | 1
 1     | B    | 3
 2     | A    | 0
 2     | B    | 0
 ....

The first column corresponds to an ID, the second is some type and 3rd some count. NOTE that the MY_ID column is not the primary key, there could be many records having the same MY_ID.

I want to write a stored procedure which will take an array of IDs and return the subset of them that match the following criteria - the ID should match the MY_ID field of at least 1 record in the table and at least 1 matching record should not have TYPE = A OR REC_COUNT = 0.

This is the procedure I came up with -

PROCEDURE get_id_subset(
    iIds IN ID_ARRAY,
    oMatchingIds OUT NOCOPY ID_ARRAY
)
IS
BEGIN
SELECT t.column_value
BULK COLLECT INTO oMatchingIds
FROM TABLE(CAST(iIds AS ID_ARRAY)) t
WHERE EXISTS (
    SELECT /*+ NL_SJ */ 1
    FROM MY_TABLE m
    WHERE (m.my_id = t.column_value)
    AND (m.type != 'A' OR m.rec_count != 0)
);
END get_id_subset;

But I really care about performance and some IDs could match 1000s of records in the table. There is an index on the MY_ID and TYPE column but no index on the REC_COUNT column. So I was thinking if there are more than 1000 rows that have a matching MY_ID field then I'll just return the ID without applying the TYPE and REC_COUNT predicates. Here's this version -

PROCEDURE get_id_subset(
        iIds IN ID_ARRAY,
        oMatchingIds OUT NOCOPY ID_ARRAY
)
IS
BEGIN
SELECT t.column_value
BULK COLLECT INTO oMatchingIds
FROM TABLE(CAST(iIds AS ID_ARRAY)) t, MY_TABLE m
WHERE (m.my_id = t.column_value)
AND ( ((SELECT COUNT(m.my_id) FROM m WHERE 1) >= 1000)
    OR EXISTS (m.type != 'F' OR m.rec_count != 0)
);
END get_id_subset;

But this doesn't compile, I get the following error on the inner select -

PL/SQL: ORA-00936: missing expression

Is there another way of writing this? The inner select needs to work on the joined table.

And to clarify, I'm OK with the result set being different for this query. My assumption is that since there is an index on the my_id column, doing count(*) would be much cheaper than actually applying the rec_count predicate to 10000s of rows since there is no index on that column. Am I wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Your second EXISTS renders the one checking the type & rec_count useless, because the first EXISTS is a subset of the second. – OMG Ponies Mar 12 '11 at 1:49
    
Post the execution plan for both versions of the query – Dave Costa Mar 12 '11 at 20:00
    
Updated the question with a new version of the query. – user654703 Mar 18 '11 at 1:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't see your second query as being much if any improvement over the first. At best, the first subquery has to hit 1000 matching records in order to determine if the count is less than 1000, so I don't think it will save lots of work. Also it changes the actual result, and it's not clear from your description if you're saying that's OK as long as it's more efficient. (And if it is OK, then the business logic is very unclear -- why do the other conditions matter at all, if they don't matter when there's lots of records?)

You ask, "will the group by be applied before or after the predicate". I'm not clear what part of the query you're talking about, but logically speaking the order is always

  1. Where predicates
  2. Group By
  3. Having predicates

The optimizer can change the order in which things are actually evaluated, but the result must always be logically equivalent to the above order of evaluation (barring optimizer bugs).

1000s of records is really not that much. Have you actually encountered a case where performance of the first query is unacceptable?

For either query, it may be better to rewrite the correlated EXISTS subquery as a non-correlated IN subquery. You need to test this.

You need to show actual execution plans to get more useful feedback.

Edit

For the kind of short-circuiting you're talking about, I think you need to rewrite your subquery (from the initial version of the query) like this (sorry, my first attempt at this wouldn't work because I tried to access a column from the top-level table in a sub-sub-query):

WHERE EXISTS (
    SELECT /*+ NL_SJ */ 1
      FROM MY_TABLE m
      WHERE (m.my_id = t.column_value)
        AND rownum <= 1000
      HAVING MAX( CASE WHEN m.type != 'A' OR m.rec_count != 0 THEN 1 ELSE NULL END ) I S NOT NULL
          OR MAX(rownum) >= 1000
)

That should force it to hit no more than 1,000 records per id, then return a row if either at least one row matches the conditions on type and rec_count, or the 1,000-record limit was reached. If you view the execution plan, you should expect to see a COUNT STOPKEY operation, which shows that Oracle is going to stop running a query block after a certain number of rows are returned.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. You're right the second query was not really an improvement, but for my purposes I'm looking for something that will not apply the count predicate if there are more than 1000 records. This does change the actual result and I'm ok with that. My assumption is that since there is an index that includes the my_id column that selecting the count wouldn't be that expensive compared to applying the predicate on 1000s of rows. Am I wrong? – user654703 Mar 18 '11 at 0:47
    
You say the second query was not an improvement, but as far as I can tell the second query that you've posted above is invalid. It's possible that approach could produce a good result, but I don't like it much. I've added a new suggestion for rewriting the subquery to my answer, I think this is a better approach. – Dave Costa Mar 18 '11 at 12:58
    
Thanks a lot for the suggestions. The query suggested would work but I can't get it to compile, t.column_value is not accessible in the inner select. Any ideas on how this could be rewritten? – user654703 Mar 18 '11 at 19:48
    
Sorry, forgot about that issue with nested subqueries. I rewrote it in a way that I think will work. – Dave Costa Mar 18 '11 at 20:30
    
This works with a small tweak, thanks a ton!! The only thing I changed was to use MAX(rownum) = 1000 in the HAVING clause instead of >=. There won't be any rows with rownum > 1000 because of our rownum <= 1000 predicate right? I'm fine with this. It's like saying that if there are 1000 rows that don't match my criteria then that means there were either 1000 or more than 1000 and so just return it anyways. The corner case is an ID with EXACTLY 1000 rows which don't match the predicates which we will return anyways, which is not a big deal. Again, thanks a lot!! – user654703 Mar 18 '11 at 21:22

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