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#include <iostream>
#include <stack>
#include <string>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
 string name;
 double gpa;
 double high = 0;
 stack<string>names;
 for (int i=0;i<7;i++)
{
 cout << " Enter student's name and gpa " <<endl;
 cin >> gpa ;
 cin >> name ;
 if (gpa > high)
{
 names.destroyStack();
 high = gpa;
 names.push(name);
 }
 else
   if (gpa==high)
  {
   names.push(name);
  }
 }
 cout << "Highest gpa is " << high << "Names with the highest gpa are"<< endl;
 while (!names.empty)
 {
   cout <<  names.top() << endl;
   names.pop();
 }
 return 0;
 }

In order to display only the names with the highest gpa, I have to put a code to remove the stack before with the lower gpa scores.So for this I thought I could use the "destroystack()" operation but when I use that and try and execute it, the compiler says that the destroyStack wasn't declared in the scope.

This AND the bottom one where I want to display the stack.It even says that empty wasnt declared. I'm confused with these errors and I don't know what it means by declaring the operations? Im using codeblocks (Not Visual studio) so does that affect anything?

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1  
Aside from the other errors that have already been pointed out, why would you use a stack for this? –  Steven Sudit Mar 12 '11 at 3:41
    
Agreed. I don't see any reason to use a stack here. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 12 '11 at 16:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This code should work to empty your stack:

replace:

  names.destroyStack();

with:

  while (!names.empty())  
  {
    names.pop();  
  } 

As you can see, empty is a function; it returns a value. In this case, it returns a boolean (true/false), so you'll need to have parenthesis after it, in order to call it.

That's why you're getting the message about empty not being declared; it means that the compiler is looking for a variable called empty, but it doesn't exist. By adding the parens, you're telling it that you want to call a function, not access a variable.

The "while loop" iterates through all of the items in the stack until the stack is empty. This effectively means that, for every item that the stack has in it, the item is "pop'd" off (pop is also a function, but it returns the item that was on the stack). Eventually, the stack has nothing left in it, and the while loop exits, because empty() returns true.

For a good reference on what functions and properties the stack template has on it, check out: http://www.cppreference.com/wiki/container/stack/start

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im sorry but when I posted the question yesterday I didn't get any response so I fiddled around with the code and I figured out that this was the issue.But thanks anyway. –  Surya Mar 13 '11 at 4:06

Because, quite simply, there is no such function destroyStack in std::stack. I have no idea where you got the idea that there is.

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You should implement that destroyStack yourself. A function such as:

void destroyStack(stack<string>& _stack)
{
  // Do whatever
}

And call it with:

destroyStack(names);

empty should be empty() instead.

Your editor, codeblocks or Visual Studio, doesn't affect anything.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought about suggesting implementing the function, too. I kept my fix simple for clarity, but it's important to note that this would work just as well, and demonstrates how to pass arguments into functions, while retaining the changes to the object passed in. (since it is passed by reference -- hence the "&") –  Lynn Crumbling Mar 12 '11 at 4:19

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