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Which one is better:

x == 'abc' || x == 'def' || x == 'ghi'
%w(abc def ghi).include? x
x =~ /abc|def|ghi/

?

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Yes, it's one of those three. Maybe not the one you listed, though. –  Jared Farrish Mar 12 '11 at 5:45
3  
Better how? Readability? Maintainability? Performance? –  James Mar 12 '11 at 5:45
    
Everything of the above –  Vincent Mar 12 '11 at 9:08
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Which one is better? The question can't be easily answered, because they don't all do the same things.

x == 'abc' || x == 'def' || x == 'ghi'
%w(abc def ghi).include? x

compare x against fixed strings for equality. x has to be one of those values. Between those two I tend to go with the second because it's easier to maintain. Imagine what it would look like if you had to compare against twenty, fifty or one hundred strings.

The third test:

x ~= /abc|def|ghi/

matches substrings:

x = 'xyzghi'
(x =~ /abc|def|ghi/) # => 3

so it isn't the same as the first two.

EDIT: There are some things in the benchmarks done by nash that I'd do differently. Using Ruby 1.9.2-p180 on a MacBook Pro, this tests 1,000,000 loops and compares the results of anchoring the regex, using grouping, along with not splitting the %w() array each time through the loop:

require 'benchmark'
str = "test"

n = 1_000_000
Benchmark.bm do |x|
  x.report { n.times { str == 'abc' || str == 'def' || str == 'ghi' } }
  x.report { n.times { %w(abc def ghi).include? str } }
  x.report { ary = %w(abc def ghi); n.times { ary.include? str } }
  x.report { n.times { str =~ /abc|def|ghi/ } }
  x.report { n.times { str =~ /^abc|def|ghi$/ } }
  x.report { n.times { str =~ /^(abc|def|ghi)$/ } }
  x.report { n.times { str =~ /^(?:abc|def|ghi)$/ } }
  x.report { n.times { str =~ /\b(?:abc|def|ghi)\b/ } }
end
# >>       user     system      total        real
# >>   1.160000   0.000000   1.160000 (  1.165331)
# >>   1.920000   0.000000   1.920000 (  1.920120)
# >>   0.990000   0.000000   0.990000 (  0.983921)
# >>   1.070000   0.000000   1.070000 (  1.068140)
# >>   1.050000   0.010000   1.060000 (  1.054852)
# >>   1.060000   0.000000   1.060000 (  1.063909)
# >>   1.060000   0.000000   1.060000 (  1.050813)
# >>   1.050000   0.000000   1.050000 (  1.056147)
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Technically it ought to be /^(abc|def|ghi)$/, but that makes it a little uglier. –  Andrew Grimm Mar 12 '11 at 6:02
    
I know that. It should use (?:...) to avoid capturing, and could also use word-boundaries /\b(?:abc|def|ghi)\b/. The OP needs to understand the difference otherwise there will be some bugs to track down at some point. –  the Tin Man Mar 12 '11 at 6:04
    
@the Tin Man: If you're merely after truthiness, why would you need to avoid capturing? –  Andrew Grimm Mar 12 '11 at 7:35
    
Because I believe it's a good practice to write what we mean when dealing with regex or anything that has potential side-effects. –  the Tin Man Mar 12 '11 at 7:56
1  
/respond_to?/, because it uses an unescaped '?' really means it could match on "respond_to", or "respond_t". '?' in regex-talk means "match zero or one of the preceding character". In this particular example it most likely wouldn't have serious side-effects because we don't have a "respond_t" method for confusion, but with other strings being matched it could open up the string match to serious leaks in your code logic. The appropriate pattern would have been to use respond_to\? which forces the question mark to lose its "specialness" and become a literal. –  the Tin Man Mar 12 '11 at 19:19
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some benchmarks:

require 'benchmark'
str = "test"
Benchmark.bm do |x|
  x.report {100000.times {if str == 'abc' || str == 'def' || str == 'ghi'; end}}
  x.report {100000.times {if %w(abc def ghi).include? str; end}}
  x.report {100000.times {if str =~ /abc|def|ghi/; end}}
end

    user     system      total        real
0.250000   0.000000   0.250000 (  0.251014)
0.374000   0.000000   0.374000 (  0.402023)
0.265000   0.000000   0.265000 (  0.259014)

So as you can see the first way works faster then other. And the longer str, the slower the last way works:

str = "testasdasdasdasdasddkmfskjndfbdkjngdjgndksnfg"
    user     system      total        real
0.234000   0.000000   0.234000 (  0.248014)
0.405000   0.000000   0.405000 (  0.403023)
1.046000   0.000000   1.046000 (  1.038059)
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The first might be a tad quicker, since there are no method calls and your doing straight string comparisons, but its also probably the least readable and least maintainable.

The second is definitely the grooviest, and the ruby way of going about it. It's the most maintainable, and probably the best to read.

The last way uses old school perl regex syntax. Fairly fast, not as annoying as the first to maintain, fairly readable.

I guess it depends what you mean by "better".

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1  
Its another fix by The Grimm Repairer :) @Andrew Grimm –  Zabba Mar 12 '11 at 6:07
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