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I am not sure whether I am missing something basic. But I am unable to understand why the compiler is generating the error for this code:

class A
{
};

class B
{
public:
    B();
    A* get() const;

private:
    A* m_p;
};

B::B()
{
    m_p = new A;
}

A* B::get() const
{
    //This is compiling fine
    return m_p;
}

class C
{
public:
    A* get() const;
private:
    A m_a;
};

A* C::get() const
{
   //Compiler generates an error for this. Why? 
    return &m_a;
}

EDIT: The compiler error is : error C2440: 'return' : cannot convert from 'const class A *' to 'class A *' Conversion loses qualifiers

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Could you provide the compiler error too? –  Ola Bini Feb 9 '09 at 13:28

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

const in the function signature tells the compiler that the object's members may not be modified. Yet you return a non-const pointer to a member, thus allowing a violation of that promise.

In your class B, you make/break no promise since you don't return a pointer to a member, you return a copy of it (and the member happens to be a pointer).

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Yes..got it now. Looks so simple now. –  Naveen Feb 9 '09 at 13:35

It's because you're returning a non-const pointer to a member from a const function.

The first part works because you're returning a copy of a member pointer, so this doesn't violate the const-ness of the get function:

class B
{
public:
    B();
    A* get() const;

private:
    A* m_p;
};

A* B::get() const
{
    //This is compiling fine
    return m_p;
}

But the next bit generates the compile error (on gcc 4)

testfile.cpp:37: error: invalid conversion from ‘const A*’ to ‘A*’

Because your const get function is providing non-const acess to m_a by returning a non-const pointer to it.

class C
{
public:
    A* get() const;
private:
    A m_a;
};

A* C::get() const
{
   //Compiler generates an error for this. Why?
    return &m_a;
}
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Because the returned pointer is not const. Change it to this:

class C
{
public:
    const A* get() const;
private:
    A m_a;
};

const A* C::get() const
{
    //Compiler generates an error for this. Why? 
    return &m_a;
}

Notice that C::get() now returns a const pointer to A.

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Member functions marked const cannot return a non-const reference or pointer to a private variable. If the compiler allowed this, anyone outside your class would be able to modify the said private variable and the const qualifier on the function would lose meaning.

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This problem can be illustrated with a simpler example:

class MyClass {
public:
    int *get() const;
private:
    int value;
};

int *MyClass::get() const {
    return &value;
}

In MyClass::get() const, value has the type const int. When you dereference it, you get const int *. That type cannot be safely (implicitly) casted to int *. To correct your problem, have get() return const int *.

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A* C::get() const
{
   //Compiler generates an error for this. Why? 
    return &m_a;
}

Because get() is a const function, the compiler treats all member variables it refers to as const. When you take the address of such a member, you get a pointer to const. But your function is returning a non-const pointer. You need to change your code to

const A* C::get() const
{
    return &m_a;
}
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Basically just add a const in front,

const A* C::get() const
{
   //Compiler generates an error for this. Why? 
    return &m_a;
}

Then if you want to access it, basically do:

C something;

const A* a = something.get();

However, your program makes very little sense, to me.

IMO, it would make most sense to do:

class A{
};

class C : public A
{
};

That way you don't have to make a "get" that returns the instance of A.

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