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I'm trying to make an iterator that performs breadth-first traversal of all the files and folders inside a particular folder. I've already done this with depth-first traversal, which returns, for example:

\A
\A\1
\A\1\x
\A\1\y
\A\2
\B
\B\1

etc.

Now I'm trying to make a program that would instead return the results breadth-first: (or level-by-level)

\A
\B
\A\1
\A\2
\B\1
\A\1\x
\A\1\y

for the same hierarchy. However, I've come across a stumbling block: Assuming I want these to happen in the correct order (and specifically, not the reverse order), I cannot find any way to perform this action without ultimately needing O(n) memory, where n is the number of files/folders on the drive, because it seems to me that I would ultimately need to keep the entire drive hierarchy in memory at some point, whereas for DFS, I can entirely ignore all entries that I enumerate previously at the same level in the hierarchy.

So my question is: Is there a better-than-linear way to use memory in order to traverse the folder?

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Do you mind slightly odd things happening when the filesystem changes under you during the traversal? If not, you can record your current position in the the hierarchy as O(depth-of-filesystem) integers representing a bunch of indexes, and then inefficiently increment that. With a run-length-encoding you can get O(depth-of-filesystem) down to O(log n), since the only way depth-of-filesystem can be worse than Theta(log n) is if there are a lot of directories containing only one object (another directory). Plus I guess path length limits mean you could probably just say depth is O(1). –  Steve Jessop Mar 12 '11 at 9:19
    
@Steve: Well, I can't really lock the file system, so yeah, I can tolerate changes while I'm iterating. (Or at least, I won't worry about it right now.) But I'm not sure what you mean by the indices -- what would each index represent inside the system? –  Mehrdad Mar 12 '11 at 9:24
    
d'oh! Or use O(depth-of-filesystem) strings to record position, of course, which makes things somewhat less weird when the filesystem changes under you, but still a bit weirder than a regular FIFO breadth-first traversal. –  Steve Jessop Mar 12 '11 at 9:25
    
@Steve: I still don't understand how using strings would work for breadth-first traversal -- don't I need to keep the entire path for each level in memory? That's O(n) memory, because the path contains the parent file names too. And even if I used the IDs instead of paths, that still wouldn't work because -- on an ideally balanced directory tree -- it's only an improvement by a factor of 2 (since the number of leaves is half the number of nodes, assuming a binary tree). –  Mehrdad Mar 12 '11 at 9:26
    
@Mehrdad: For instance, suppose you are currently printing \B\1. Then the current index list is {1, 0} (for B and then for 1). To increment this, we observe that there are no more files in B, then observe that there are no more files in the root, and so we move on to {0, 0, 0}, which is A\1\x. –  Steve Jessop Mar 12 '11 at 9:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If your platform supports the notion of inode number, you may be able to store a single number for each directory, to indicate the largest inode number you have visited for that specific directory. If you access the inodes in numerical order, keeping track of a single entry will be good enough to know where the 'next' entry is.

It's a small gain, as you'll still need to maintain an inode number for every single directory on the system, but you won't need to care about the contents of the directories.

Of course, keeping in mind that any traversal mechanism is subject to horrible race conditions, you'd have to have some level of assurance that the filesystem is quiescent or your code is resilient to directories / files being deleted, created, moved, etc., while your code is underway.

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Interesting, I hadn't thought of inode numbers before. However, that's still an O(n) memory requirement, right? That's the thing I'd like to avoid here. –  Mehrdad Mar 12 '11 at 9:21
    
@Mehrdad, yes, it is still O(N), but in the number of directories, not all files. (Trying to keep track of place in lists through other mechanisms might be O(N) in the number of files.) –  sarnold Mar 12 '11 at 9:26
    
I guess inode number isn't strictly required; you could also sort the list of files and directories by name, and store the location into the list that way, as well. –  sarnold Mar 12 '11 at 9:27
    
Given that it's a tree, having storage that is O(TreeDepth) is OK. That's typically O(log N) relative to the number of leaves (and nicely so for filesystems, which tend to have high branching factors). –  Donal Fellows Mar 12 '11 at 9:32
    
@Donal Fellows, since @Mehrdad wants to traverse in BFS, my mechanism can't just be O(TreeDepth), as I suggest storing an integer for every directory being visited. (Perhaps some can be reaped once that particular path has been exhausted, but I can't imagine that would drastically save memory.) –  sarnold Mar 12 '11 at 9:35

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