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I am a R-novice. I want to do some outlier cleaning and over-all-scaling from 0 to 1 before putting the sample into a random forest.

g<-c(1000,60,50,60,50,40,50,60,70,60,40,70,50,60,50,70,10)

If i do a simple scaling from 0 - 1 the result would be:

> round((g - min(g))/abs(max(g) - min(g)),1)

 [1] 1.0 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.0

So my idea is to replace the values of each column that are greater than the 0.95-quantile with the next value smaller than the 0.95-quantile - and the same for the 0.05-quantile.

So the pre-scaled result would be:

g<-c(**70**,60,50,60,50,40,50,60,70,60,40,70,50,60,50,70,**40**)

and scaled:

> round((g - min(g))/abs(max(g) - min(g)),1)

 [1] 1.0 0.7 0.3 0.7 0.3 0.0 0.3 0.7 1.0 0.7 0.0 1.0 0.3 0.7 0.3 1.0 0.0

I need this formula for a whole dataframe, so the functional implementation within R should be something like:

> apply(c, 2, function(x) x[x`<quantile(x, 0.95)]`<-max(x[x, ... max without the quantile(x, 0.95))

Can anyone help?

Spoken beside: if there exists a function that does this job directly, please let me know. I already checked out cut and cut2. cut fails because of not-unique breaks; cut2 would work, but only gives back string values or the mean value, and I need a numeric vector from 0 - 1.

for trial:

a<-c(100,6,5,6,5,4,5,6,7,6,4,7,5,6,5,7,1)

b<-c(1000,60,50,60,50,40,50,60,70,60,40,70,50,60,50,70,10)

c<-cbind(a,b)

c<-as.data.frame(c)

Regards and thanks for help,

Rainer

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There are several packages on CRAN that may suite your needs: outliers, mvoutliers, heavy, extremevalues... just head over to contributed packages and find an appropriate one. –  aL3xa Mar 12 '11 at 12:48
    
Thanks for this advice, I will have a look at these packages! regards, Rainer –  Rainer Mar 13 '11 at 10:46

2 Answers 2

Please don't do this. This is not a good strategy for dealing with outliers - particularly since it's unlikely that 10% of your data are outliers!

share|improve this answer
    
hello Hadley, the example dataframe was just an example. Nevertheless: why do you think this strategy is not good and which better strategy would you prefer? –  Rainer Mar 13 '11 at 10:45
    
Well.. you can always use boxplot rule to screen outliers. Note the "screen", not remove. You should expect outliers in your data, according to John Tukey, but you should (almost) never remove them. Take a look at this post: goo.gl/Ywbo8 –  aL3xa Mar 13 '11 at 13:16
    
@Rainer outliers are model dependent - throwing away extreme data points now is just perverse - what if having fitted a model most of those "outliers" were just at the extremes of the conditional distribution of y given the covariates in the model? Alternatively, use a method that is robust to outliers. Finally, if throwing this into RF, I doubt it will make any or much difference to the decision rules selected if you have reasonable signal in your data. In short, leave them in the data and the rescaling is irrelevant in RF because it only uses the rank orderings... –  Gavin Simpson Mar 14 '11 at 12:52

I can't think of a function in R that does this, but you can define a small one yourself:

foo <- function(x)
{
    quant <- quantile(x,c(0.05,0.95))
    x[x < quant[1]] <- min(x[x >= quant[1]])
    x[x > quant[2]] <- max(x[x <= quant[2]])
    return(round((x - min(x))/abs(max(x) - min(x)),1))
}

Then sapply this to each variable in your dataframe:

sapply(c,foo)
       a   b
 [1,] 1.0 1.0
 [2,] 0.7 0.7
 [3,] 0.3 0.3
 [4,] 0.7 0.7
 [5,] 0.3 0.3
 [6,] 0.0 0.0
 [7,] 0.3 0.3
 [8,] 0.7 0.7
 [9,] 1.0 1.0
[10,] 0.7 0.7
[11,] 0.0 0.0
[12,] 1.0 1.0
[13,] 0.3 0.3
[14,] 0.7 0.7
[15,] 0.3 0.3
[16,] 1.0 1.0
[17,] 0.0 0.0

Edit: This answer was meant to solve the programming problem. In regard to actually using it I fully agree with Hadley

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Thank you very much for help, Sacha! –  Rainer Mar 12 '11 at 10:44

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